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Living off the land

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by roguebowhunter, Aug 7, 2009.

  1. roguebowhunter

    roguebowhunter medford Member

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    maybe i missed it but i haven't seen a thread that has to do w/ living off the land .. not gardening. things like edible plants and roots ect.. we all know about morels but can we find them ??? if theres another thread that follows this line of thought point me in that direction please ...Don :thumbup:
     
  2. torpedoman

    torpedoman land of corrupt politicians Member

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    in the real world living off the land will require a nomadic live. You need to be were the food is available when it is available.That will require a nomadic tribal lifestyle because the strongest tribe will occupy the area when the food is available there, much like the american indian any area is quickly cleaned of the food crops and moving to a new area is required.
     
  3. CEF1959

    CEF1959 Willamette Valley, Oregon New Member

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    Very tough to do. Many have tried, mostly young, idealistic and naive. I don't know of a single US success story. Lots of burst bubbles and hungry bellies followed by a desperate quest for gainful employment or some other means of sustenance.
     
  4. eldbillbo

    eldbillbo clackamas New world samurai and a redneck none the less Bronze Supporter

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    Black Berries and opossums ummm yummy survival food and plenty in the burbs of portland
     
  5. Cougfan2

    Cougfan2 Hillsboro, OR Well-Known Member

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    There's always the Donner party diet. :devil:
     
  6. roguebowhunter

    roguebowhunter medford Member

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    i understand the difficulty and maybe i didn't express myself quite right... or i used the wrong topic in the beggining .... if shtf i agree probably would be the man w/ the biggest clan wins .. more to my point is to ADD to my daily diet if i so chose to.. i wanted more of a .. how to .. and some advice on how to find edible plants in the NW... Don
     
  7. CEF1959

    CEF1959 Willamette Valley, Oregon New Member

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    Safeway has some edible plants. I have a local food co-op that has some that taste pretty good.

    But seriously, there are lots and lots of books out there on edible wild plants. Typically the mushrooming books are separate, but they too are out there.

    Which reminds me... Blackberries are ripening this month, and huckleberries next. Then come the chanterelles. Holy schmoly, where's my basket?
     
  8. tionico

    tionico Thurston County Well-Known Member

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    Had some ripe blackberries out of a volunteer patch in my yard this afternoon (is there any other type of blackberry?) Mostly sweet and flavourful, but still somewhat tart. Very edible. I prefer the blueberries from my next door neighbour's farm, though.... and THEY are coming on strong right now.

    Coons are looking fat and happy, the deer also seem to be doing well. Considering inviting one of the group that feeds on my ground apples to come by for supper one month...... no game birds, the coyotes have et up all the pheasant and quail that used to populate this place... at least two covey of quail and no less than four families of pheasant. Nothing for two years or more, now..... sad. I used to enjoy the pheasants )no, not under glass... or plastic)
     
  9. mxitman

    mxitman N. Seattle Member

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    I agree, it's tough to do. I spent a week last summer just hiking through the cascades trying to live off the land. My wife was gone for a week so I decided to get away myself. I took just the basics as if I was bailing out. I brought a small fishing kit, my .22 rifle plus my .45 for any critters of the 2 or 4 legged type. I also had just a small tent and the very basics in clothes, emergency food and water... etc.

    I did ok, I didn't outright starve but was always hungry and tired. My plan was to move everyday as if I had to get away from someone or something. This made less time for searching for food because I had to make camp everyday and traveled about 5-10 miles each morning.

    It was a great and rewarding trip but nonetheless. Fishing was good enough; I caught 4 trout the first 2 days and only 1 trout in the last 4 days. I had no luck in finding any squirrels to shoot, but did manage to get a shot off on a grouse but I missed it. The only other living thing I caught was 2 small tree frogs that weren't worth trying to eat. I didn't try hunting for anything larger as it was a summer trip.

    I managed to find lots of berries, greens etc. I only brought coffee and some trail mix to eat and that was gone in the first 3 days. I pretty much ended up not eating much the last few days and was ravenous when I got back to town..lol

    If this had been reality I would have tried setting up a more permanent camp next to the first few lakes I visited due to the better fishing there. I also would have setup snares and traps to catch more food.

    I've included a few pics from my trip for you to enjoy.
     
  10. NK777

    NK777 West of Portland Member

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    That's a kool trip! FWIW I say it can be done but remember to can stuff and squirell it away for winter. There is more then food to survival year round though. You'll need to build a decent shelter and store wood if you want to make it through winter. Also consider gardening. Potatoes are pretty easy to grow and good food.
     
  11. mxitman

    mxitman N. Seattle Member

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    my response and trip was for someone who didn't have much, and was strictly taking off to the woods and try to survive off the land with little or minimum preps.
     
  12. torpedoman

    torpedoman land of corrupt politicians Member

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    the dandilions that everyone poisons to grow useless grass is fully edible, thisle is fine not unlike celery once pealed. rose hips are a great sourse of vitiman C. yarrow is edible, berries, pine nuts. gather rose hips and yarrow to make tea with in the winter and you will not get a cold.
     
  13. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

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    there are a bunch of books on wild foods. Stalking the Wild Asparagus, Peterson's guide to edible wild plants, The Forager's Harvest. I also grabbed a couple books on wild herbs and their medicinal uses as knowing whats out there is good. There is also this if you want to get more serious about wild foods around here.

    From personal experience there is a ton of wild foods in the woods and fallow lands around here. Some are obvious like the berries and apples and such. Some are not so much like nettles, thistles, and cattail (I can tell you from experience that nettle leaves make a great soup stock base or tea). It is kinda fun to grab a good book read it, then go take it into the woods. I would recommend a good class though. Just ease into it slowly and have fun. I really like eating things strait out of the nature. Its good like that.
     
  14. Contract_Pilot

    Contract_Pilot Vancouver, Washington Active Member

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    A few years back I took a real world class on out door survival... taught me a lot but a lot is N/A here as it was for the icecap in Greenland & on the Ocean.

    I got to club a seal with chunks of ice then eat it? Learned what not to eat on that ice cap plant and animal species... I forgot which one but know by sight you can kill the beast and still starve to death if male take the fur and use as seal/fish bait but if female the milk will be more than enough to gain mass weight and tastes better than cows milk. Also what plants that will lower your body core temp.

    Ice can be razor sharp and it kill a deer and seal! You can use ice to make fire... Seal skin will keep you really warm and comes off easy. You can use muskox hair for fishing line...

    If your ever in NUUK Greenland for a few days it costs a few hundred dollars but fun real world adventure with a real Inughuit... You go in to the arctic with nothing but the clothes on your back and live off the Ice.

    I also would like to find a guide service like that here in the Pacific NW. I think I know a lot but probably enough to kill myself.
     
  15. ragr

    ragr Snoho New Member

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    This is a good book I carry with me in my pack: http://www.amazon.com/Wild-Harvest-Edible-Pacific-Northwest/dp/088839022X

    I like to experiment with at least one of the recipes each time we head out into the woods regardless of what other food we've packed in. It's got good drawings, descriptions of what they plants are used for (sustenance, medicine, etc), preparation instructions and is divided by season.

    -r
     
  16. nwwoodsman

    nwwoodsman Vernonia Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    First, go to the book store. Libraries probably won't be the best place to hang out when the food runs out. Two books that I keep under my coffee table are Edible Wild Plants, A North American Field Guide. The other is Field Dressing and Butchering Big Game, by Monte Burch. Don't think that when the fit hits the shan that you'll be able to just ask your neighbor. They might be unable or unwilling to help you out. There are also countless survival manuals that you can print off of the internet.
    Second, the whole idea that a person can just bee bop out into the woods and eat like a king is bull$#!+. Yes there is food to be found but most of it is seasonal. Blackberries in August, chanterelles in the fall. What about apple, pear, plum, and cherry trees? Where are those found and will everyone else be picking from the same tree in the park? I've made mental notes of several fruit tree stands in areas that very few if any people know about. What part of the year are are cattails edible? Did you know they are edible? Learn when the salmon or trout run. Learn which of those muddy ponds full of cow crap have bass & blue gill in them. LEARN TO CAN!!! People are always tossing out canning books at garage sales. Get a huge canning pot and stock up on lids, rings, and jars. That's all you need. Most people are extremely intimidated by the thought of canning their own food, but it's as easy as tying your own shoes. The fruit that shows up in august and September and it will be spoiled in a few weeks to a month if not preserved. If you can it, it will last for at least a year.
    And of course, given the nature of this forum, buy the proper firearms for survival. You aren't going to be rabbit hunting with a .38 special and a .22 won't take down an elk (don't give me the b.s. about shot placement). Buy a good .22 and bricks of .22 ammo. You can buy a 20 gauge single shot from Wal-Mart for about a hundred bucks and shotgun ammo is CHEAP. When it comes crashing down, those are truely the only two firearms that a person will NEED. Yeah, an AR15 is great if you're going to play Rambo against NATO or the Chinese army but I think your odds are better if you're playing Davy Crockett against a rabbit.
     
  17. roguebowhunter

    roguebowhunter medford Member

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    thank you for your input .. i already do my own canning i will make a trip down to the local book store to look up those books ... Don
     
  18. bersaguy

    bersaguy Oregon Member

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    A great source for free info on home canning is the local office of the state ag. extension service.
     
  19. Mutoman

    Mutoman North Bend Active Member

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    I have thought about pulling some of the dandelions in my yard, cleaning and drying the roots, grinding them and making some dandelion coffee. I heard is tastes pretty good. Out of curiosity, I bought some dandelion tea at a health-food store. It pretty much tastes like coffee which encourages me to try even more.
     
  20. powersbj

    powersbj Seattle Area Active Member

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    I dont know about the bait fishing.... I think you would be much more successful net fishing. Or a little m-80... mabey something bigger.