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Thank you, @JedB , I appreciate that. I'd seriously considered just that thing.

In fact, I might do a modified version of that with a little trickery/tomfoolery added to the mix.
 

Spitpatch

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I'm really not happy with how the stock is turning out. It's become more and more obvious that there are places where the original finish that wasn't sanded completely away. He needed new cowboy boots so I decided to buy myself some time and bought him boots for his birthday.
I guess I'll go back after it and spend more time sanding the damn thing all over again...

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Keepin' track of those "billable hours"?
 
No! I'm not keepin track.

I do know it will all be worth it when he shoots "his" gun. Then none of this hassle will matter.

I think I'll take a break from the stock work for a day and work on the brand I'm making to use on the base of the grip.
 

joesan99

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I've done a few stocks over the years and have never considered any "cost' whether $ or time. For me it was always a pleasant endeavor, more so now that I'm an "old geezer", and my memory now goes back to the times I was a kid with a paper route to earn $ and spend it on hunting fishing and trapping stuff. I enjoyed watching faces light up when I returned an old gun with a new life given to the wood.
You are correct, this will be a cherished memory for you orygun.
 

Spitpatch

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No! I'm not keepin track.

I do know it will all be worth it when he shoots "his" gun. Then none of this hassle will matter.

I think I'll take a break from the stock work for a day and work on the brand I'm making to use on the base of the grip.

I advised you early of the folly of a diligent man believing he could advance himself by devoting his time to gun work.
 
Decided to get back to this project and gave it the first shot of bluing. Unlike the stock, I'm pretty happy with the way this part is turning out. I'll card it down and give it a couple more treatments.
20210326_113808.jpg
 
Thank you.

Post #48 happened when my keyboard died this morning and is the reason it looked like I had nothing to say.
I found time this past weekend to spend a few hours with this project.
The original finish is almost like a filler and is hard to remove. This became very apparent after I resanded the stock and applied oil.
Sanded again and you can see traces of the finish embedded in the wood.
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Kept sanding and another coat of oil.
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It started looking a lot better, but was still dark in places. Sanded it one more time and am now going to lay on several coats of oil.

Gave the barrel and action another couple rounds of bluing. I'm happy with the finish. The pics look crappy cuz of the oil smudges.
20211128_131319.jpg 20211128_131350.jpg 20211128_131510.jpg


Getting close to having it all back together. While I was working on it the other day I realized I've not shot it yet. :eek: Think I'll save that first shot for the kid.
 

K-22

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I use old terry towels rather than wet paper towels, you get more steam and better control, I think. My experience has been that the dent's don't lift back completely every time. I suspect some of the finish is still present, and is preventing the steam from penetrating. The steam causes the wood fibers to expand, you can apply the steam many times as needed to raise the dent. Some you will just have to live with. o_O
Gabby
Bill.
If you prick the dents several times with a needle, that will help the steam penetrate the wood. This greatly improves/expedites the process. You will never see the needle pricks after the fact.
Best,
Gary
 
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Bill.
If you prick the dents several times with a needle, that will help the steam penetrate the wood. This greatly improves/expedites the process. You will never see the needle pricks after the fact.
Best,
Gary
Thanks I never would have thought of that!
Gabby
 
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If you mentioned your grandson's age, I missed it. Younger than 12 or so, it could be better that you're doing the work. Older than that, he might enjoy being involved in the process.

At age 12, I was up to my elbows in restoring my first firearm, a bolt action single shot 20 ga. Dad & I worked together through those months of work, meaning he taught me a step, then doing it was up to me. For better or worse, it was my baby & I stuck to it through multiple repeats of sanding, raising the grain, sanding, raising, etc etc etc. And the metal, I swear that I must've plied sandpaper and steel wool long enough to take a pound off the gun. Looking back now, I know that if I'd been much younger, I wouldn't have had the patience to carry it through.

In addition, I would've been too young for hands-on involvement in the heat annealing/tempering/oil quenching of small parts (including our own umbrella rib checkering tools). Without going into embarrassing detail, I'll admit that maybe age 12 was too young for that stuff.
 
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He'll be twelve in January and doesn't quite have the patience yet. Obviously I didn't either, as this thing sat for months between sessions of work.
 
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This is kinda like a new television season for a favorite show from months ago, where you look forward to the fresh episodes.
Exactly. I enjoy the day-to-day threads as they flare up and fade away, but project threads (like this one, the DIY Blunderbuss and the Golden Gamo) give me a feeling of anticipation as I click my NWFA bookmark.
 
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Congrats on not letting this die!
I have done a few older Marlins. They are made from Beech wood or Birch. Both do not stain well. Minwax makes a Pre Stain Conditioner/Sealer that helps, and that is followed up with Gel Stain in your favorite color. The sealer helps even out the absorption rates so you don't get light and dark areas, and the Gel stain works more like a paint staying on top of the wood, so that it doesn't soak in un evenly. And then your favorite hard finish over the top to protect it.
When Marlin made these they mixed the stain in the top finish [ that is why it was so hard to remove!]

I still have a 25 from my teen years. It shoots as well today as it ever did. The only real changes I have made is replacing the trigger return spring. It went from a 9 lb trigger to a 3.5 lb. The spring I use is from under the flint of a Bic lighter. just have to trim to length. But you might want to wait a year or so before doing that to a kids gun.
My guns stock is showing 45 years of wear But I keep putting off refinishing it . Afraid it will not shoot as well. But my old friend needs a new suit! And your post has given me the start I need to get going!
Thanks DR
 
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I use old terry towels rather than wet paper towels, you get more steam and better control, I think. My experience has been that the dent's don't lift back completely every time. I suspect some of the finish is still present, and is preventing the steam from penetrating. The steam causes the wood fibers to expand, you can apply the steam many times as needed to raise the dent. Some you will just have to live with. o_O
Gabby
I do some luthier work and have had pretty good luck with putting a drop or two of boiling water directly over the ding using a hypodermic needle and letting it stand for awhile. Can be repeated if need be.
 
Thanks for the words of encouragement.
Sometimes I think this is more like Groundhog Day than anything else. Didn't like how it was looking.
Sanded again, and again and again.
@dangerranger60 , that's a good idea for the trigger spring. This one is pretty stiff. Once I get past the refinish of the stock I'll look into that.
 
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Stripped, no chemicals. Refinished. Total time 3 hours. If you don't know what you are doing, maybe leave it alone. 20210821_081738.jpg
Wby mkv deluxe 61 years old, stripped, refinished with tru oil, dings were filled with same leveled off and disappeared! Surface was polisned with very fine paper and automotive compound. Skill and knowledge are the difference between a restored finish and a goobered up mess. More involved time wise of coures, about 12 hours total labor.
 
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