"Lead Contaminates the Soil And Poisons the Earth"

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Tango1niner, Nov 17, 2012.

  1. Tango1niner

    Tango1niner
    Tacoma
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    A while back, I was on Ft Lewis, and happened to stop by the Firestone Store. Two guys behind the counter...I asked wheel weights. It went something like this...I said, "Do ya'll happen to have any used wheel weights that I could scrounge, to cast some bullets and sinkers"? The one with all the authority (obviously proud of himself), says..."Yes, we have lots of them, but you can't have them." Me: "Why"? (already knowing his professional answer)...Him: "'Cause lead contaminates the soil and pollutes the ground". Me: "Do you know where lead comes from"? Him: "Yes"...Me: "Where does it come from"? Him: "The ground". Me, making solid eye contact with him: "Now...Think about what you just said and try to make some sense out of it". His expression told me that it all went over his head.

    I was wrong for doing that, but his attitude just pissed me off.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2012
  2. Swedish K

    Swedish K
    SW Washington
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    some times the dimmer switch doesn't go up.
     
  3. Greenbug

    Greenbug
    Bend
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    Don't drink the water, fish crap in it.
     
  4. deadshot2

    deadshot2
    NW Quadrant WA State
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    Tire Store Managers have never been known for being geniuses.

    If he was really smart he would have told you that there's no lead in wheel weights anymore thanks to legislation pushed by the "greenies".

    What's hilarious about that is that those who pushed for the No Lead laws then go out and buy hybrid vehicles which use batteries made from even more toxic materials using processes that generate even more pollution and hazardous waste. Go figure.
     
    sheepdip and (deleted member) like this.
  5. slingshot1943

    slingshot1943
    salem or
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    The USPS replaced all the lead weights on their vehicles a few years ago. Naturally they pulled the rigs in just to change the weights instead of just doing it as tires were serviced. Money is not a problem, even when they are going bankrupt.
     
  6. RVTECH

    RVTECH
    LaPine
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    But try to explain that to your average libtard greenie. Does anyone know if there is a plan in place for when the batteries from these things start to fail and they need to be disposed of? A while back I spoke to a Toyota Tech who told me the batteries were considered hazardous material but he did not know about disposal/recycle.
     
  7. keystir

    keystir
    Hillsboro, OR
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    Not sure what the point of this thread is. Lead is an extremely dangerous and toxic heavy metal, exposure to which can be especially harmful to pregnant women and children. The argument that since lead "comes from the ground" therefore it cannot be either a contaminate or pollutant is nonsensical. I think the expression given from the sales manager may have been slightly misinterpreted.
     
  8. gunnails

    gunnails
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    In response to RV Tech.

    I am not an expert on the subject, but as I understand things, lithium does not wear out and is a fairly precious commodity, so the lithium batteries will wear out and then the lithium would be recycled to make new batteries.
    This battery tech is quite interesting and the secret to the viability of electric cars. Cell phones, tablets, electric tools, are also fueling the development of battery tech.
     
  9. PhysicsGuy

    PhysicsGuy
    Corvallis, OR
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    I don't entirely understand the logic of the OP. Uranium "comes from the ground", as do many other toxic and hazardous materials. The difference from its natural state and human modified state is that it is found naturally in a non-enriched/low concentration state, typically in an ore that does not promote leaching into groundwater. Just because its "natural" doesn't make it any way less damaging to humans or the environment.

    I do get that you're saying that it is being "recycled" back into the ground when it gets there, but it is in much higher concentrations than found naturally.
     
  10. Tango1niner

    Tango1niner
    Tacoma
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    Oh
     
  11. PiratePast40

    PiratePast40
    Willamette Valley
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    Lead can absolutely be toxic depending on the concentration, form, and ingestion pathway. Would be a stretch to say that handling lead wheel weights in that form would be an issue. However, smelting and the subsequent volitization of the metal can indeed produce a toxic breathing hazard. If you breath in the vapors, you're introducing it to your body in an easily absorbed form.

    I doubt that the tire store manager has a clue why and when it's a hazard though.

    As to the issue of uranium, the naturally occuring form is more a heavy metal hazard than one of radioactivity. Now, once you get into enriched forms and more exotic isotopes, it's even nastier stuff.
     

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