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Just saw this .223/5.56 on DSA's sight

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Silver Fox, Apr 28, 2010.

  1. Silver Fox

    Silver Fox Puyallup, WA Well-Known Member

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  2. matt_w

    matt_w Hillsboro, OR Active Member

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    Can you reload nato-spec ammo? I thought it was more difficult to do.
     
  3. Cougfan2

    Cougfan2 Hillsboro, OR Well-Known Member

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    I am sure you can, but you need to watch pressures. That is why they say you can shoot .223 ammo in a rifle chambered for 5.56 Nato, but you don't want to shoot 5.56 Nato in a rifle chambered for .223. If memory serves me the case walls on the Nato brass are slightly thicker than that of .223 brass so the same load in a .223 casing will yield higher pressures in a 5.56 Nato casing.
     
  4. Grizzly_A

    Grizzly_A Portland Metro Area Member

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    MFG by a saudi company and distributed to the americans....hmmmm.

    Did anyone check to see if it was ticking, clicking (radiometer), or had white powder inside it?

    I'm sure it's fine. :)
     
  5. coctailer

    coctailer Portland, OR/Hastings, MI/Vancouver,WA I run with scissors.

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    Google "Eldest Son Vietnam"
     
  6. Bhowe

    Bhowe Seattle Member

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    I was under the same belief.
     
  7. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    An issue with reloading milspec brass is that the primers are usually crimped in place. After you punch out the primer, you have to swage each primer pocket before you can put in a new primer. That's no big deal. You can get an RCBS die set for $30 that does it, or there are machines for $100 that do it faster.

    I can tell from the pics in the link that those are crimped. (casing swage-crimped over primer to hold them tight.)

    Jack at Dan-Dee sales in Sweet Home just ordered me 2,000 xm193 5.56 Nato milspec rounds for $700 - same price as that link but American. I'd have to go with that. Dan-Dee Sales is in our vendor section. Jack is absolutely the greatest.
    He often has a really good supply of primers and powder in stock at good prices.

    As for reloading 5.56 Nato, the rounds are hotter and you do need a 5.56 chambered and stamped gun rather than a .223. You can, however load used 5.56 casings to .223 specs (lower pressure and slower bullet speed) and shoot them just fine in a .223. You use the same dies for loading either so they will physically fit just fine.

    I always preach owning a chronograph. Load up a few, test the bullet speed against factory specs for either .223 or 5.56 (or any other round) and when you hit the sweet spot for powder charge, start loading. .223 will want a bit less powder that 5.56.

    You can shoot .223 all day long in a 5.56 gun, but not the other way around. The .223 just isn't as hot.
     
  8. matt_w

    matt_w Hillsboro, OR Active Member

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    Thanks Gunner...I couldn't quite remember the reason why, but I knew it was at the very least a little more time consuming. :)
     
  9. achenbackd31

    achenbackd31 WI New Member

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    I was told by my gun guy that when loading military brass for 223 its usually 10% less powder then in civi brass
     
  10. 3 AE

    3 AE Oregon Member

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    Just checked with www.northwestshootersupply.com He has Federal American Eagle brand .223 55 grain FMJ at $372/1000. But he gives you a 10% discount for that qty. It comes out to $335/1000 rnds. Here's a Northwest local dealer selling quality American made ammo at a very good price. Have done business with him before and have never been unsatisfied with his service. :thumbup:
     
  11. ArmedAmish

    ArmedAmish Sherwood, OR Member

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    I bought a thousand rounds of this (or something VERY similar) and have had to check every round to make sure the bullets were seated right. Every so often I'd get a round where the brass had folded down when the bullet was seated. Really hard to get out of the chamber when that happens!

    Bryce