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Jeebus, mary and joseph does no one install and borsesight scopes anymore....

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by DEADTIME, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. DEADTIME

    DEADTIME Coeur D alene Active Member

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    I will end up buying my own boresight tools I can see it now. I have been to 4 shops and they all look at me like I have a 3rd on in my forehead when I ask about mounting and boresighting a scope. Anyone else have more luck? Ill just give in and buy one myself but there is a real art to mounting a scope, you need about 200 ft lbs on the scope rings to do it right and I need new tools anyway...my wife is going to kill me.
     
  2. westcoastal

    westcoastal north coast of oregon Active Member

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    you can get a good set for under 50 bucks, good to have on the shelf anyway.
     
  3. sheepdip

    sheepdip Redland Well-Known Member

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    I have been mounting my own scopes for years, no big trick to it. get it mounted up, set a target at 25 yds and let fly. I had a scope mounted and bore sighted one time, took the rifle out to shoot and couldnt hit a half sheet of plywood at a hundred yards. kinda soured me on the whole boresight thing.
     
  4. kevlar

    kevlar Mt.Angel Active Member

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    200 ft pounds? Uh no. Even attempting 200 inch pounds will most likely destroy your scope and rings.
    Get yourself a nice kit with an inch lb torque wrench and a scope level. It's quite easy to mount scopes. And you can bore sight close enough by looking down the bore and setting the scope to match what you see through the bore.
     
  5. BANE

    BANE Battle Ground WA. Well-Known Member

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    200 ft. Lbs on the scope rings!? Unless you have 3/4" grade 8 bolts holding your rings on.
    More like 25 in. Lbs...
     
  6. SquackDaddy

    SquackDaddy Marion County Member

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    your local Bi-Mart would be more than happy to boresight your rifles for you for free. (at least my local Bi-Mart does) Give them a call and ask them!
     
    soberups and (deleted member) like this.
  7. Skang

    Skang WA Well-Known Member

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  8. DEADTIME

    DEADTIME Coeur D alene Active Member

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    Went in to an old geezer who use to do the mounting and bore siting routine and he told me that the rings when mounted to the rifle should use 185 to 200 ft lbs of torque to make sure the scope is dead stable, not the scope itself just the rings where mounted to the actual rifle.
     
  9. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Are you talking about the ring bases? (Foot pounds for your car lug nuts are around 110 ft/lbs.) Base screws are generally set with blue loctite also.

    General ring and base screw specs from Leupold: base screws 14 in/lbs, ring screws, 15-17 in/lbs, and 45 in/lbs on the windage screw.
     
  10. sheepdip

    sheepdip Redland Well-Known Member

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    there is only one thing on a gun that would even come close to taking 185-200 ft. lbs. of torque, that is where the barrel screws into the action. jbett98 numbers look good.
     
  11. Morpheus

    Morpheus Columbia Gorge Anyway, back on the farm.

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    This reminds me of an old manual I had for attaching two pieces of equipment together. It said 1000. ft/lbs. When it was supposed to say 10.00 ft/lbs. Funny all of the phone calls I got about people spinning screws through the equipment.
     
  12. mcathcart

    mcathcart Beaverton, Oregon Active Member

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    Nah, 200ft lbs sounds about right. Post us a pick when you are all done.
     
    mjbskwim, Ironbar, Redcap and 15 others like this.
  13. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    My Torque wrench used to do auto work only goes to 150ft lbs. it is almost 2ft long and it takes everything I have with that much leverage to get a head bolt to 150ftlbs. Those are 1/2" diameter Grade 8 studs.

    The tiny 6-40 6-48 sized screws used to hold a scope base to a receiever would snap in two at around 10ftlbs. About the same torque would crush the tube on any scope I have seen over the last 40 years.

    Your OLD Geezer is full of Bull exit.
     
  14. PromptCritical

    PromptCritical Oregon City, OR Member

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    I don't think you have a real good feel for what 200 foot-lbs actually is.

    That's a force of 200 lbs with a lever arm of 1 ft.

    So, put your rifle high up on a sturdy shelf, put a wrench with about a 1 ft handle on the bolt, with the handle parallel to the floor, then hang from the handle. That will be about 200 ft lbs.
     
  15. mrbook

    mrbook Battle Ground, Washington Member

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    I would not let that "Old Geezer" anywhere near my rifle. 200ft lbs is crazy.
     
  16. FarmerTed1971

    FarmerTed1971 Portland, Oregon, United States Well-Known Member

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    This thread is full of win!
     
  17. tomcat mv

    tomcat mv Maple Valley WA Member

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    If you want to learn a ton of stuff on scope mounting, go to the Sniper's Hide forum. Personally, I mount all my own scopes. I only use Warne rings and have a Warne torque driver. Depending on the ring manufacturers instructions (most good rings come with them or they have info on their web-site) the base screws are usually torqued to anywhere from 25 to 40 inch/pds. and the ring screws usually around 20. I am running a few Vortex scopes and they have a very good tutorial (web-site) on how to mount your optic. My preferred technique is to mount the bases and then lay the scope in the rings and tighten just enough to hold the scope but still allow it to move, then take outside where i have a plumb string line hanging from a tree about 30 yds. away. Set weapon on a table and either having the rifle on a bipod or a gun vise, level the rifle port to starboard by setting a small level on the action then place the level on the top scope turret and do the same. then sight through the scope and get the x-axis of the reticle aligned with the plumb line. Check everything again and torque your ring screws, alternating from fore and aft and side to side. you can also use a set of feeler guages to check the spacing of the ring tops and bottoms unlesss they are top split rings like I prefer. the most important thing is to get the x-axis of the reticle plumb with the action! Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2012
  18. DEADTIME

    DEADTIME Coeur D alene Active Member

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    Considering I'm six foot five 290 pounds it might be more with me hanging on it....
     
  19. DEADTIME

    DEADTIME Coeur D alene Active Member

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    The only torque wrenches I have are automotive in nature but I do have one that gos to 350
     
  20. MarkAd

    MarkAd Port Orchard Well-Known Member

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    I mount and bore sight with and without a bore sighter. I have also, because I didn't have time or want to took a couple of rifle to my LGS. 10 bucks and both only needed slight adjustments to work for me.
    Bore sighting is a skill everyone should have. I am continually amazed at how many people, of all all ages do not know anything about sighting a scope.