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Is there a electrical-mechanical devise to remover 223 primers...

Helocat

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The only tumbling process that will truly clean primer pockets is a wet tumbler with ss pins.
Fixed it.
Stainless Chips guys, not the pins. Scrubs primer pockets and never get stuck. However, I still run a universal decapping die in station 1 with all calibers I load as a safety check for any obstructions in the flash hole.

$17 from AmmoBrass.com. $$ well spent.
Screen Shot 2020-03-27 at 2.48.26 PM.png
 

Helocat

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Yes, you can automate. Dillon 1050 with an AmmoBot auto-drive converting military LC 5.56 into 300BK with the Dillon RT1500 case trimmer.

I run my brass separately so this brass was wet cleaned w/o chips, dried, then fed through the 1050 to universal de-prime, swage the primer pocket crimp then resize the neck, then wet tumbled w/chips to clean the primer pockets and dried. I resize the neck on all as some will be loaded into 5.56.


View attachment IMG_2827.TRIM.mov
 
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gmerkt

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Cleaning primer pockets is one of those actions that serve to differentiate handloading from reloading.
Sounds very high minded. The denigrating tone isn't necessary. Not everyone who shoots needs to be a handloader. It's true that there is a degree of quality in reloading that varies. Cleaning primer pockets is one step that might yield a low order of variance in ammunition performance. I understand that bench rest shooters strive for the highest degree of consistency possible in all steps of the process. Which makes me wonder, is there a torque indicator used in seating primers into clean pockets? Brass flow in a primer pocket of a fired case varies from one case to another. So even if you could measure the amount of pressure exerted when seating a primer, it wouldn't necessarily be consistent. Just using this as an example of how far you might try to go to achieve consistency "as a handloader."

Cleaning primer pockets would certainly be in order to prevent high primers. And if this were the matter at hand, I'd recommend the practice. I inspect primer pockets and flash holes. Every once in a while, I find one that needs scaling out, in my opinion.

I've seen the results of chrono tests with two lots of ammo, one with cleaned primers, the other with uncleaned. The ES was exactly the same. The velocities didn't vary enough to be significant. In my own shooting, I've never noticed any difference so I don't routinely do it. In my own case the human element in shooting is a far greater variable than the sanitation of primer pockets . So I guess that makes me a reloader not a handloader.

Some say it doesn’t matter but to each there own.
This exactly.
 
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Sounds very high minded. The denigrating tone isn't necessary. Not everyone who shoots needs to be a handloader. It's true that there is a degree of quality in reloading that varies. Cleaning primer pockets is one step that might yield a low order of variance in ammunition performance. I understand that bench rest shooters strive for the highest degree of consistency possible in all steps of the process. Which makes me wonder, is there a torque indicator used in seating primers into clean pockets? Brass flow in a primer pocket of a fired case varies from one case to another. So even if you could measure the amount of pressure exerted when seating a primer, it wouldn't necessarily be consistent. Just using this as an example of how far you might try to go to achieve consistency "as a handloader."

Cleaning primer pockets would certainly be in order to prevent high primers. And if this were the matter at hand, I'd recommend the practice. I inspect primer pockets and flash holes. Every once in a while, I find one that needs scaling out, in my opinion.

I've seen the results of chrono tests with two lots of ammo, one with cleaned primers, the other with uncleaned. The ES was exactly the same. The velocities didn't vary enough to be significant. In my own shooting, I've never noticed any difference so I don't routinely do it. In my own case the human element in shooting is a far greater variable than the sanitation of primer pockets . So I guess that makes me a reloader not a handloader.

This exactly.
Well said Sir!!!;)
 

Lesliet

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That's interesting about chips vs pins. May have to try that when I lose enough pins to make it necessary to replenish. I've never had a pin get stuck in a case, yet, but I'm loading straight wall pistol cartridges rather than necked down rifle cartridges. I like to use a Harvey hand decapper and watch a show while I shuck primers out, one movie generally nets me a huge pile of deprimed cases. Then it goes in a wet tumbler with pins, and after separating most of the media out, I just tumble it for 15 more minutes with water and magnets to collect the strays. I've read that it's possible to have your brass " too clean", such that it sticks in the dies, but it hasn't been a problem yet, and I like shiny.
 

gmerkt

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Here's one thing that I've wondered over the years. Okay, say you decap the brass, then place it in a dry tumbler with corn cob or walnut media. Invariably, this results in some cases having a grit of media stuck in the flash hole upon retrieval. My practice has been to poke these out with a machinist's scribe or similar. Is this really necessary? Wouldn't the power of the detonated primer blow the grit into the case upon ignition? Would this defect ever be likely to cause a misfire? Would it be likely to cause any detraction to ballistic result? We can't have a little camera in there to see what happens.

With steel media of any kind so stuck, there is no wonder in my mind.
 
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Regardless of the results 'on paper' changing to wet tumbling from dry was one of the best things I have ever done - reloading wise.

Shorter tumble time, no dust and reusable media are only part of the advantages. The bright, clean primer pockets as well as the rest of the brass are another and cleanup and finish are much faster than with dry tumbling and I have never had a pin stuck in a piece of brass.
 
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Lee does have a new AP press that does automate brass prep. I haven't tried one But I have seen others deprime, swage, and size bullets on theirs. It seems pretty fast.
I know others don't want to hear this but clean brass moves so much smoother through my press. It makes cleaning worth it. I also prime off the press. It gives me one more chance to catch split brass, or other defects. And knocking the primers out before cleaning means I don't get spent primers or the grit and carbon from them in my press! DR
 

Spitpatch

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My analogy along those lines might be closer to a comparison of spaghetti sauce crafted from scratch using fresh ingredients and simmered all day versus opening a can of Spaghetti-O's. You won't starve to death eating either one. But...
 

Spitpatch

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Balderdash.
I prefer Oregano.

All matching cases? Something a handloader would concern himself with. A Reloader might not (and might not ever know the difference or care).
All cases trimmed to identical length? A handloader would spend the time. A Reloader would get by just fine making sure they are all under maximum length.
Weigh each charge? Handloaders frequently take this care. Reloaders measure more often. (Benchrest guys mostly measure too, with great attention and skill doing it.)

And so it goes: I do both, depending on the cartridge and the application. Neither is "better", applied to its intended purpose.

I take the time to clean primer pockets also so that if a round doesn't go "bang", or a primer seats with difficulty, I can eliminate primer residue as a cause.

I will also admit to a bit of "magic feather syndrome", in that it makes me believe I've done something extra that just might matter.
 

Certaindeaf

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I prefer Oregano.

All matching cases? Something a handloader would concern himself with. A Reloader might not (and might not ever know the difference or care).
All cases trimmed to identical length? A handloader would spend the time. A Reloader would get by just fine making sure they are all under maximum length.
Weigh each charge? Handloaders frequently take this care. Reloaders measure more often. (Benchrest guys mostly measure too, with great attention and skill doing it.)

And so it goes: I do both, depending on the cartridge and the application. Neither is "better", applied to its intended purpose.

I take the time to clean primer pockets also so that if a round doesn't go "bang", or a primer seats with difficulty, I can eliminate primer residue as a cause.

I will also admit to a bit of "magic feather syndrome", in that it makes me believe I've done something extra that just might matter.
Depends on the job. For whatever, screw that primer pocket cleaning business.
 
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I remember way back in the day I did a 400 rd batch of .308 for my target rifle, Remington 700 P LTR. I sorted cases, I made sure everything was clean and shiny, I did primer pockets, they were all trimmed, I threw most of the power charge and then trickled in the rest. I spent a lot of time on this ammo and it shoots sub MOA.

Then I got a target AR, Bushmaster Varminter with 24" heavy target barrel. I reload on a progressive press, with mixed head stamped brass which is mostly LC surplus, thrown powder, the powder is pulled down surplus, I top them off with 55gr Nosler ballistic tips. Of course I tumble my brass, trim to length and swage primers if needed. This ammo also shoots sub MOA.

I am not a reloaded or hand loader, I am a shooter. It it was cost effective for me to buy this same ammo loaded I would and never touch a loader.
 

Spitpatch

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I remember way back in the day I did a 400 rd batch of .308 for my target rifle, Remington 700 P LTR. I sorted cases, I made sure everything was clean and shiny, I did primer pockets, they were all trimmed, I threw most of the power charge and then trickled in the rest. I spent a lot of time on this ammo and it shoots sub MOA.

Then I got a target AR, Bushmaster Varminter with 24" heavy target barrel. I reload on a progressive press, with mixed head stamped brass which is mostly LC surplus, thrown powder, the powder is pulled down surplus, I top them off with 55gr Nosler ballistic tips. Of course I tumble my brass, trim to length and swage primers if needed. This ammo also shoots sub MOA.

I am not a reloaded or hand loader, I am a shooter. It it was cost effective for me to buy this same ammo loaded I would and never touch a loader.
It's the Ballistic Tips.:cool:
 

Helocat

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That's interesting about chips vs pins. May have to try that when I lose enough pins to make it necessary to replenish. I've never had a pin get stuck in a case, yet, but I'm loading straight wall pistol cartridges rather than necked down rifle cartridges. I like to use a Harvey hand decapper and watch a show while I shuck primers out, one movie generally nets me a huge pile of deprimed cases. Then it goes in a wet tumbler with pins, and after separating most of the media out, I just tumble it for 15 more minutes with water and magnets to collect the strays. I've read that it's possible to have your brass " too clean", such that it sticks in the dies, but it hasn't been a problem yet, and I like shiny.
All of my tumbled clean brass get a few shots of my homemade (lanolin and 99% Alch) lube and tossed in a dedicated plastic box before going into the press. Solves all pistol belling in the powder station sticking issues. Then of course rifle brass actually needing the lube.
 

Camelfilter

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All of my tumbled clean brass get a few shots of my homemade (lanolin and 99% Alch) lube and tossed in a dedicated plastic box before going into the press. Solves all pistol belling in the powder station sticking issues. Then of course rifle brass actually needing the lube.
Yah, great process!

Can pick up pure lanolin off of Amazon. Use a small mist/spray bottle for the mix. Or reuse a Hornady (or other) lube spray bottle.
 

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