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Interior Security Door Hardware

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by gunnails, Oct 29, 2013.

  1. gunnails

    gunnails Hillsboro Active Member

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    So we have been doing some home improvements, such as new interior door hardware and paint.

    We have talked for a while about upgrading our master bed room door to solid core and making it somewhat high security. The idea being during a home invasion if we or one of us could make it to the master bedroom and bolt the door, we would then have access to a old cell phone for 911 and a night stand gun, and then we might be able to make our stand. Or just buy some time to think things through, maybe escape through the back master bath door, what ever.

    My original thought was a standard interior door knob and some sort of heavy slide bolt, with lots of long screws every where.

    Here is what I am thinking ive-40b26d-6.jpg

    This looks a bit wimpy, particularly the strike plate, any suggestions or thoughts?

    Thanks in advance.

    Nails

    ive-40b26d-6.jpg
     
  2. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    Go whole hog, it's your house.. I'd put a full bar like a 2x4 across the door inside the room and a deadbolt for while you're away/out of the house.
    And a solid core door is.. a solid choice.
     
  3. gunnails

    gunnails Hillsboro Active Member

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    =================================================================

    Thought about that, in particular the deadbolt, a 2x4 aint happening, it needs to be something you can engage quickly and look good, I am considering a one sided dead bolt but have no idea how secure they are. It needs to look nice and not paranoidish.
     
  4. simon99

    simon99 Central Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I would go to a reputable locksmith in the area and see what they have to offer. Most locks that you buy at Home Depot or Lowes are easily defeated if you know what your doing and have the right tools. Check out security rated hardware from companies like ASSA or the like. They're more expensive but extremely secure.
     
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  5. Dunerunner

    Dunerunner You'll Never Know Well-Known Member

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    Unless the door jam is reinforced with steel, it can be kicked in. The mount on the door will pop right out also, so maybe think about a steel fire door and perhaps hung in a steel frame. I would also think about the back master bath door which will then be your weakest point.

    FEMA320DOORPLANS
     
  6. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    $15.00 will get you a heavy duty door prop rod.
    Once you kick it tight up against the door knob, it will reinforce any door.
     
  7. jrprich

    jrprich PNW Well-Known Member

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    Dunerunner is right.
    It is not so much the lock as it is the door and more importantly the door frame. I looked at all the premade stuff for reinforcing door frames, just take a look on youtube and you will see. My thoughts were that these "kits" are way over priced but the idea is very sound.
    So I just made my own by purchasing a 3/16"x2"x4' piece of flat steel for each door at your trusty Home Depot......about $9 each.
    If you want details, shoot me a email.
     
  8. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    Have you considered a killing dog? Instead of a GSD (they shed like a cotton gin factory) consider a Giant Schnauzer.. same size, same temperament (the Germans use them a lot for the same kind of work) and they don't shed.
     
  9. hikepat

    hikepat washington Member

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    Work in hardware industry here is my advice

    Solid core wood door. Get from good door store not cheap box store junk.

    Heavy duty commercail grade hinges such as Stanley 179 hinges 4x4 your choice of color. If door swings out use
    Non Removable Hinges so pins can not be popped out
    Use steel 2 inch or greater screws from Deltana

    B60 deadbolt or something like that such as those made by Baldwin. Latches are saw proof and locks hard to drill out cylinder. Make sure the strike reinforcing system for the strike is installed and use the face plate mortise latchbolt not the drive in latch bolt.

    When door and frame are out take house studs right to jamb so screws for all can get into the 2x4 stacked material its best to have at least 6 stacked together but two 2x4 min.

    Ives 054mb dutch door bolt for second lock or the same type of unit from Deltana/ Long screws for strikes for this slide bolt, Note this slide bolt is strong enough for exterior dutch door so its nice and thick.

    Use any privacy door knob or lever you want even reuse the one thats is on door now.

    This will make door very strong but remember the walls are still weak so if you really want more of a panic type room this would also need to be addressed but the door will protect you most of the time.

    Had same type of set up on front door with man tried to get into house after my wife. Did not even have to fix door because it was to strong to kick in for him Had 3 inch screws on hinge side.

    Recomend this set up many times each week for front doors.
    It should be plenty for interior door without spending a lot.
     
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  10. simon99

    simon99 Central Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Not to sound weird, but what about your drywall walls adjacent to the door? Are you going to reinforce your walls? You can kick right through a drywall wall in seconds......
     
  11. billdeserthills

    billdeserthills Cave Creek, Arizony Well-Known Member

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    Jamb Enforcer has pre-drilled holes

    Absolute Security Products - Maker of the Jamb Enforcer - How it works
     
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  12. FarmerTed1971

    FarmerTed1971 Portland, Oregon, United States Well-Known Member

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    Call Steve Crowthers at Precision Locksmith. Those guys can hook you up.
     
  13. Harrytop

    Harrytop Tangent Active Member

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    I'm with hikepat. I'm a general contractor and I use two 3" screws in each hinge on every exterior door I install. I also use 3" screws one the stricken plates and dead bolt plates. One more thing, make sure to angle them just enough so they get some meat of the studs.

    Yes the drywall would be your next weak link, but unless your "safe" room has a large common wall you should be ok. It takes some time and luck to bust thru a drywall wall with out hitting a stud or wiring. Not all but most wall studs are 16" on center or 14.5" apart so that doesn't leave much room to get thru quickly.

    Spare cell phone, pepper spray, bat and a shot gun! Let's see them crawl thru the drywall now;)

    Good luck with the project and have fun doing it.
     
  14. jrprich

    jrprich PNW Well-Known Member

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    Yes, but I doubt I could one for a decent price as the closest dealer to me is in Colorado.....shipping costs would be high. Plus these usually mount on the face of your door frame which would look bad IMHO.
    But to each their own.
     
  15. gunnails

    gunnails Hillsboro Active Member

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    Lots of good advice in this thread and I thank you all for your input. I will stop in at Davis Lock and safe and talk with them as I have done business with them in the past.

    Hike pat, do you have any experience with one sided dead bolts? I have pictured in my minds eye a typical dead bolt from the inside of the room that does not drill all the way through the door so as you can't tell it's there from the out side? Seems as though not having the lock set anchored to the door from both sides could cause some weakness.. I like the dutch door bolts, just seems the strike would not sit far enough back to be able to hit the studs with long screws..

    Where I am at, I have a door ordered, a solid core masonite door (will match my existing doors) with 3 count 4"x4" hinges, bored for a single lock set with mortised strike, Pre hung, in paint grade. I am a General Contractor with a heavy back ground in carpentry and have installed at least a thousand doors, interior, exterior, high end, low end, blah blah, I got the skills and the tools. Just no one has ever asked for exactly what I want to do here.

    I think I am going to buy a 4' to 6' x 4" piece of steel and mount it to the strike side of the door jamb between the jamb and the studs, Probably glue and screw the steel to the door cause glue is cheap and it works. Then I can drill the steel for long screws from the inside of the jamb into the studs, and I should also be able to tap the steel so that my Dutch Door Bolt screw directly into that, and maybe also install a one sided dead bolt.

    What I want is an install that looks clean and ordinary, and that would defeat the average perp for 2 minutes. There is not a door out there that can not be breached by a determined force.
    I'm not looking for bullet proof, in fact I would like my bullets to pass right through. Do not want the panic room (at this time), just a barricade strong enough to buy us a couple of minutes for us to gather our thoughts and properly react. If they come in with sledges and fire axes,,, I'm screwed.

    As far as going through the drywall, the door sits at the end of a hall so I'm good there.
     
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  16. Harrytop

    Harrytop Tangent Active Member

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    Gunnails, it sounds like you have a great plan.
     
  17. billdeserthills

    billdeserthills Cave Creek, Arizony Well-Known Member

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    A One-sided deadbolt is as strong as any other deadbolt, as it uses the same latch. I like that they leave nothing to directly attack from the outside of the door, which can become a liability in a bad situation. They will provide as good protection as front door deadbolts do & will need a strike strengthener for any kind of kick in resistance. The 3" screws mentioned are good for tying the
    wood behind the strike (hole for latch) together & a heavy duty strike plate should come with the 3" screws above. Don't use drywall screws, they will let you down.

    Schlage makes a nice one-way deadbolt and it includes a hardended steel heavy strike with 3" screws, model # BC 180(standard bolt)and BC 580 (heavier bolt)

    Kwikset used to make their own heavy duty strike but the cheap bastards have downgraded to a weaker model recently

    All this work will only give you extra time if the door opens out
    Very scary how easy a solid core inside door will just peel away in the area of the bolt when they are inwards opening.
     
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  18. lola85

    lola85 Portland Member

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  19. billdeserthills

    billdeserthills Cave Creek, Arizony Well-Known Member

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  20. jrprich

    jrprich PNW Well-Known Member

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    Most of the kits install directly over your existing wood frame. So if yours is painted white, no prob, but if you have finished wood doors and frames these kits are likely to look kind of crude. For less $$ and a bit of time you can install thicker metal behind the wood jam as well as improve the shimming between the jam and your house studs. When done your wood jams will look pretty much stock.