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imho,things you DO NOT NEED for reloading.

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Throckmorton, Apr 16, 2012.

  1. Throckmorton

    Throckmorton Florence,Ore ah gone Well-Known Member

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    kind of a different thread,eh? imho,ymmv,etc.

    dillon roller handle.the ball handle works fine,spend the dough on bullets. ! bought one,would neve buy another one.

    dillon Strong Mounts.If ur bench is the right height and sturdy,you can easily get along with out this,I have for nearly 20 years !

    quick change die 'stuff'.You change dies so seldom and it's only a minute to swap them out,so quick change is is just a gimmick,nothing else.
    >to clarify, by 'quck change I meant the bushing setups on some single stage loaders.just don't take that long to swap 1 die.sorrry for the murkiness of that idea.<<


    digital scales and digital calipers. manual is just fine and never need batteries !! oh,and buy a good scale,meaning spend at least 50 bucks on one.

    any book other than Lyman's,(tongue in cheek here) it's my best friend. !
    ..but do have others for cross checking.

    brand new dies and press.Save bucks by shopping for used,spend the money on powder,etc

    as I say,IMHO,YMMV,. feel free to add to the list
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2012
  2. Nwcid

    Nwcid Yakima and N of Spokane Well-Known Member

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    I have not used Dillon so I dont know if theirs are different but I love my quick change die plates for my RCBS. I have a dozen or so main calibers I load for. I keep the dies all set in the plate so I dont have to reset them each time. Say I go from .9mm to .223 I have the same settings I used on the last batch and the batch before that, ect.
     
  3. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I been reloading for 43 years and have never needed anything but a single stage press. I work in batches. I might do 500 cases one step at a time. And I weigh every powder charge and seat the bullet right away. Almost impossible to double charge or miss a charge.

    Currently doing 1300-1400 30M1 takes a while but the results are excellent.
     
    coop44, darkminstrel, Varmit and 3 others like this.
  4. wichaka

    wichaka Wa State Well-Known Member

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    For the most part I agree, but the quick-change stuff makes it nice for those who have just one load they use for different calibers.

    I have one load I use for 45, the same for 38 Super etc., with everything set up for those loads it makes sense to have the quick change set up.
     
  5. Jacurso

    Jacurso Douglas Co. Active Member

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    I like it both ways. Quick change is good. I often load for others and the calibers can be varied.

    Single stage is also good for certain things...
     
  6. Throckmorton

    Throckmorton Florence,Ore ah gone Well-Known Member

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    to clarify, by 'quck change I meant the bushing setups on some single stage loaders.just don't take that long to swap 1 die.sorrry for the murkiness of that idea.
     
  7. wichaka

    wichaka Wa State Well-Known Member

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    That makes better sense...I agree with that.

    I pretty much use Lymans pistol book exclusively as well.
     
  8. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Isn't this a great Country?

    We're all free to do things pretty much the way we like to.

    I agree that the things you listed are not NEEDED. But then again, one doesn't even need a press

    p-657.jpg

    For just under $40 and a cheap rubber mallet from Harbor Freight and you're loading. Go even cheaper and just buy one at a Swap Meet/Garage sale.

    For those that want to laugh, there are a lot of competitors that use one of these for load development at the range.

    p-657.jpg
     
  9. Varmit

    Varmit Beaverton, OR Member

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    I have used Lee Loader in several calibers and shotgun. Slower, noisy, no full length resizing, but add a case trimmer & powder scale, and if loading for a bolt action, you can make better than most factory ammo. Shotgun use didn't impress me!

    Oh!.......and some parts will wear out after about 2000 rounds
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2012
  10. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    For the life of me I can't understand how anyone gets by without a Wilson Ammo automated ammunition loading machine. :)

    xam.jpg
     
    Grunwald, mjbskwim, PBinWA and 5 others like this.
  11. Key-Hay

    Key-Hay North Carolina Active Member

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    Throck...What are you up to now...

    I have gotten use to the ball. But after seeing Poke's 650 setup, I'm thinking it's time to 650.

    Going back and forth from 45 to 38 would be a pain without the quick change doohickies. I like my strong mount cause my loading bench top is 3/4" Melamine (Not dog food).

    I gave up on the abacus for weighing my powders. Digital is the way to go especially since decent units are available cheap.
     
  12. coop44

    coop44 Tacoma ,WA Well-Known Member

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    Batching the cases also works for me. Usually a hundred or two at a time, though I will clean and decap in larger numbers.
     
  13. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Maybe they have a Camdex 2100

    2100SeriesLarge.jpg

    2100SeriesLarge.jpg
     
  14. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    I have both, and I prefer the Wilson. :)

    /Joking. :)
     
  15. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    Wilson? That's Howell CNC/Ammoload worldwide.

    I used to have 5 camdex JS6300's I'm so glad I don't anymore.
     
  16. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Describes my experience almost to a "T".

    Quick-change stuff only makes sense if you have saddled yourself to one load for one gun (for life??). The moment you change a bullet, or change a gun, you need to reset everything anyway. Heck: even if I did relegate myself to one load for one gun, I still could not resist my habit of double checking all my settings anyway to make sure everything is correct: takes just as much time as starting from scratch.

    One thing I don't use anymore: Primer arm on my RCBS A2: Hand prime everything now.

    One thing I thought I'd never use again, but resurrected it: Plain old-fashioned RCBS Case Lube and Case Lube Pad. Recent forming chores find this old standby goo the best for this hard work on brass.

    Sorry, Throck: I dearly love my digital scale partnered with the powder dispenser for automatic charge weighing: But I DID NOT get rid of my fine Ohaus 304 Dial scale, and still use it when I want to feel "really scientific" about everything (and have plenty of time to kill waiting for the needle to settle down some).
     
  17. Silver Hand

    Silver Hand Southern Oregon Coast Well-Known Member

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    Hey move over - I think we are stuck under the same rock.
    I think single stage has it's advantages, especially when accuracy is involved. As with many things, I probably trim by brass more often than most, that should be enough said but I wont shoot a dirty primer pocket either. Batching takes a bit more time, But old habits are hard to brake. Especially good old habits.
    I did finally did Quit weighing my jacked bullets, except the ones I need for accuracy ;);
     
  18. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I wonder if other "Handloading Luddites" are as amused as myself when very basic problems are described by those who learned on (and never explored away from) progressive machines: Problems that single-stage pupils found solutions for very early on.

    This is not to say one approach is better than the other. I believe each approach has proper application to desired results. Rather, it is a statement toward hard evidence that a Handloader that begins and learns on single-stage equipment can insulate and educate himself toward many pitfalls that may erupt should he later choose to become a Reloader with progressive equipment.
     
  19. Horses are delicious

    Horses are delicious Willamette Valley Active Member

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    I once answered a friends questions, "What kind of press do you use? How much do you reload?" with the answers "A Lee. and A lot." He literally winced and said "Ewwww."
    I asked the same question of him and he proudly replied "A Dillon such-and such XYZ5000, and not hardly much at all."

    The truth is that I bought what I could afford until I know for sure that reloading was something I was truly passionate about. I should offer him $100 for the Dillon just to get it out of his attic!

    I think that the only things you really NEED to reload are items that you are actually going to use!
     
  20. PBinWA

    PBinWA Clark County Well-Known Member

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    I don't care what anyone says, I "need" my Chargemaster 1500.