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I've got a off roading trip coming up. I enjoy eating well on the trail, and love cooking outside. I tell people what I'm cooking on the trip and ask if they want in or not.

I'm not leaving it up to someone else to take care of my food unless I really trust them.
...but you WOULD hunt with them???
"This is this."

Oh man. The main reason I keep the party small. Only on a couple of rare occasions have I risked letting someone bring another to our hunting camp that I haven't personally vetted. One worked out fine, the other, not so much. The buddy that invited him along apologized profusely and hasn't brought any outsiders since. The funny thing is, he drove my buddy nuts, much worse than he bothered me. :s0140:
NEVER have I allowed a friend to bring a "friend" to hunt. If that is something to be done, then that guy has to have become my friend through another avenue of acquaintance first.

My hunting grounds are the very most valuable thing in my life. I share them only with people I have come to trust implicitly. If you can't trust your buddy to bring pots and pans, why are you hunting with him?
Our camp I do the shopping and the cooking. We eat prime rib, ribs , shrimp, steaks and whole chickens. No one is going hungry with us
We also eat with no holds barred, keep one foot on the floor. Probably much better than we eat at home, on average. We also have a hot shower, Flat Screen TV in the wall tent (for movie night after supper).

Freeze dried food is for the Brooks Range, 100 miles above the Arctic Circle chasing sheep. In a camp built out of what is hauled in a truck, I gotta have my Baby Backs and Corny Hens. :cool:
 
NEVER have I allowed a friend to bring a "friend" to hunt. If that is something to be done, then that guy has to have become my friend through another avenue of acquaintance first.
In both cases, these were not people I had never met - just not hunted with. I really like both of them, but only one of them did I enjoy hunting with. Also, the friend that invited the guy that didn't fit in, technically he was sharing "his spot" with me. He knew it was a hard lesson learned and didn't make the same mistake again.

My hunting grounds are the very most valuable thing in my life. I share them only with people I have come to trust implicitly. If you can't trust your buddy to bring pots and pans, why are you hunting with him?
I'm not sure how this pertains to my comments. Maybe related to my buddy not remembering to turn his Rino GPS on? Unfortunately, forgetfulness can catch up with us all as we age. I'm no Spring chicken either, so I won't abandon an old friend just because he doesn't always remember. He's also the one that shared most of "my" hunting spots when they were "his". Like you, I don't share them casually.
 
"Them" being my friends who I'd rather not eat their cooking? Of course. Most dudes I know can't cook worth a damn 😂
Hunting camp is the very best training ground for poor bustards whose Mamas didn't love 'em enough to teach them to cook. The critics are boundless, and the consequences of a mistake are immediately observable. :cool:
 
In both cases, these were not people I had never met - just not hunted with. I really like both of them, but only one of them did I enjoy hunting with. Also, the friend that invited the guy that didn't fit in, technically he was sharing "his spot" with me. He knew it was a hard lesson learned and didn't make the same mistake again.


I'm not sure how this pertains to my comments. Maybe related to my buddy not remembering to turn his Rino GPS on? Unfortunately, forgetfulness can catch up with us all as we age. I'm no Spring chicken either, so I won't abandon an old friend just because he doesn't always remember. He's also the one that shared most of "my" hunting spots when they were "his". Like you, I don't share them casually.
Sorry if it came off that way. NO implication toward your way of doing things or your GPS partner (he's an ASSET to a hunt). just stating mine.
 
I took a friend to elk camp once, he whined all day about "lets go in the camper and play cards" strike one. Then I woke in the middle of the night to the sounds of him puking in the sink in the camper, strike two. Then a few days later I got a spike on the ground and my friend was close enough to come help with gutting the kill. I got started and asked my friend to grab a leg to which he replied "I ain't touching that thing" steerike three!! We are still friends but don't hunt together.
 
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I took a friend to elk camp once, he whined all day about "lets go in the camper and play cards" strike one. Then I woke in the middle of the night to the sounds of him puking in the sink in the camper, strike two. Then a few days later I got a spike on the ground and my friend was close enough to come help with gutting the kill. I got started and asked my friend to grab a leg to which he replied "I ain't touching that thing" steerike three!! We are still friends but don't hunt together.
Must be a "townie" or "city boy"
 
I took a friend to elk camp once, he whined all day about "lets go in the camper and play cards" strike one. Then I woke in the middle of the night to the sounds of him puking in the sink in the camper, strike two. Then a few days later I got a spike on the ground and my friend was close enough to come help with gutting the kill. I got started and asked my friend to grab a leg to which he replied "I ain't touching that thing" steerike three!! We are still friends but don't hunt together.
Proof positive that five words can cost you shared winter's meat. :cool:
 
No hunting, but went backpacking A LOT 30 some years ago. Spent what little extra cash i had on decent gear to bring those packs to a decent weight with everything needed, Learned early on to plan every meal and pack enough to last the trip with a lil extra.

We always dumped gear before heading out to ensure all critical items were there and no duplicates of unesseary stuff. Everyone carried some of the common items as well as their own personal stuff. That rule came early on after we did a massive hike in that was more brutal then it shoulda been. I noticed a buddies wife had a easy trip for such a huge pack she carried, It was all clothing, not a single food item, tent, sleeping bag, etc,

He got an earful. Never happened again.
Still carry on the tradition for any trip more than an hour away from home.
 
the kippers guy was not a hunter. a long time friend who wanted to try bow hunting. i gave him advice on equipment and such, he ignored my advice of course. bought the setup the archery shop suggested. good choice but cost a lot of $$$. went hunting 1 time and never bow hunted again. he eventually passed his bow to his son who became a good hunter.
 
Invited a first time hunter to join us. He came later, so I wasn't around when he packed. This was remote moose hunting using 4 wheelers. Provide him a detailed list of food and supplies. He showed up with a trash bag of food. His dad was a salesman for Tom's snacks. Yup, a week supply of peanut butter crackers and such. Fortunately I had more than enough MRE on hand. Otherwise, he was properly outfitted. I did get a sixty inch bull moose. He got lots of teasing.
 
I'm glad I have a great family too hunt with. In elk camp every body takes a dinner night. And we group shop for lunch stuff, snacks and breakfast food. If people want special food for their day pack they are more than welcome to do that and keep it in their footlocker.
 
I hope you pick your spouse better than hunting partners.
Good partners can make a hunt, bad ones ruin it. I've been fortunate to have two good hunting partners over the years, but I mostly hunt solo.
Solo, I'm trekking in on foot and making camp. I pack light, eat very light meals and hunt hungry.
I tend to lose 10-15 lbs during hunting season.
Years ago I hunted with one good friend, but we weren't very serious and only on one occasion did we camp out.
Other than that, it was with Dad and my wife. We worked out a plan where breakfast was on our own, lunch my wife and I supplied, dinner on Dad.
None of my friends are hunters and I'm picky about who I do things with. I've solo hunted a lot, too.
I guess I'm selfish. I prefer to be responsible for myself, and these days, if it's not my wife as my companion, I'd just as soon go alone.

If we had not moved to this side of the state, I'm sure my feelings would be different. Dad hunted with a bunch of people we knew when we lived in John Day, but I never got the opportunity to go. (Mom and Dad thought school was much more important than hunting...)
 
We have radios for specific uses, like if someone is tracking a wounded animal and you have no idea where you might wind up or if you might have to overnight it out of camp, but trying for general use it was a ClusterF and the general consensus was to scrap them. Radio's going off when people were in the middle of a hunt, batteries not fairing well in the cold temps and people prematurely ending their hunt unnecessarily. Interrupting a guys hunt like that, even by accident, really P's people off. :D
We used radios with specific check in times to eliminate the possibility of disruption. However, my wife is always antsy and Dad didn't seem to care if his radio was on, so they would communicate before the check in time. Not only did it piss me off, but one time, the first time my wife was following her compass, Dad gave her a bad heading because he forgot to figure in declination! At least he headed her to the road she was supposed find in an "earlier" location than I'd planned. (Dad was driving the "pick up vehicle") I had him back up the road a 1/4 mile and they connected. I met them back at camp as planned and had a stern conversation about not getting off of the air until ALL parties have connected. We never had that problem again.
If he had her heading off in the other direction, I would have stopped my hunt and would have gone for her. Fortunately, that area isn't heavily wooded...
EVERYONE has to be on the same page when hunting in groups. Doesn't matter if it's something like above or picking food and camp duties.
Dad's gone now and my wife and I hunt our property for deer. It's a place my wife is comfortable and knows her way around which lessens my concerns to a great degree. If we go back to eastern Oregon to hunt elk, like we're thinking of, I'm planning on a set of Rhinos, just so I can keep track of the Wife!
 

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