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In my lifetime I have known many machinists, professional & hobby, all have been gun owners yet none have ever made guns - well except for one but he was making custom muzzleloaders.

Making a gun (in the traditional sense) would require a better than average knowledge of machining and metal working and would be a time consuming process - along with a minimum of equipment the average person does not have.

I read a lot of posts where some talk about making guns like it's some sort of kitchen table process anyone can do but that is not the case. Also I see the 3D 'printing' process' brought up many times and while I admit I only have basic knowledge of it I suspect if one had the equipment and ability to 'print' parts, say plastic frames/receivers there are still a lot of parts that will need to be machined - and that won't take place on a 3D printer.
It probably is well under 1% of the populace. I have a generous view of what qualifies as a privately made firearm. Pretty much any firearm made with a post 1968 unserialized receiver would be considered a privately made firearm in my book. Even with that generous view, I still bet it's under 1% of the State's residents that have made one.
 
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In my lifetime I have known many machinists, professional & hobby, all have been gun owners yet none have ever made guns - well except for one but he was making custom muzzleloaders.

Making a gun (in the traditional sense) would require a better than average knowledge of machining and metal working and would be a time consuming process - along with a minimum of equipment the average person does not have.

I read a lot of posts where some talk about making guns like it's some sort of kitchen table process anyone can do but that is not the case. Also I see the 3D 'printing' process' brought up many times and while I admit I only have basic knowledge of it I suspect if one had the equipment and ability to 'print' parts, say plastic frames/receivers there are still a lot of parts that will need to be machined - and that won't take place on a 3D printer.

I do a lot of hobby & part time welding & metal fabrication and some light machine work - and probably have more equipment than most average 'tinkerers' - but I am still a LONG way from having the ability to effectively 'make' a gun.
There are and will continue to be purists that produce things from their base forms, but you're right that most choose to take advantage of modern technologies, processes and free market components. Like in almost any area it still requires a level of knowledge, expertise and eperience to deliver a formed and functionl end product. I don't disparage those that employ those technologies available to them.

I mean... it's just a easy to say to the person that claims they make clothing.... "Oh really? Where's your loom?"

I build cars. "Oh really? Where's your foundry?"

I'm a computer programmer. "Oh really? 01001101 01100001 01100100 01100101 00100000 01111001 01101111 01110101 00100000 01101100 01101111 01101111 01101011 00100001"
 
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There are and will continue to be purists that produce things from their base forms, but you're right that most choose to take advantage of modern technologies, processes and free market components. Like in almost any area it still requires a level of knowledge, expertise and eperience to deliver a formed and functionl end product. I don't disparage those that employ those technologies available to them.

I mean... it's just a easy to say to the person that claims they make clothing.... "Oh really? Where's your loom?"

I build cars. "Oh really? Where's your foundry?"

I'm a computer programmer. "Oh really? 01001101 01100001 01100100 01100101 00100000 01111001 01101111 01110101 00100000 01101100 01101111 01101111 01101011 00100001"
01111001 01101111 01110101 00100000 01100100 01101001 01100100 01101110 00100111 01110100 00100000 01101101 01100001 01101011 01100101 00100000 01101101 01100101 :s0109:
 
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Or less.

In my lifetime I have known many machinists, professional & hobby, all have been gun owners yet none have ever made guns - well except for one but he was making custom muzzleloaders.

Making a gun (in the traditional sense) would require a better than average knowledge of machining and metal working and would be a time consuming process - along with a minimum of equipment the average person does not have.

I read a lot of posts where some talk about making guns like it's some sort of kitchen table process anyone can do but that is not the case. Also I see the 3D 'printing' process' brought up many times and while I admit I only have basic knowledge of it I suspect if one had the equipment and ability to 'print' parts, say plastic frames/receivers there are still a lot of parts that will need to be machined - and that won't take place on a 3D printer.

I do a lot of hobby & part time welding & metal fabrication and some light machine work - and probably have more equipment than most average 'tinkerers' - but I am still a LONG way from having the ability to effectively 'make' a gun.
"Making" firearms covers such a broad range of activities. Today all of the parts except the receiver are not regulated. It is possible to make ONLY the receiver and then buy the rest and you have a PMF. The amount of machining involved in a lower AR15 for example isn't too advanced. OTOH, if you're making your own barrel and chamber is a WHOLE different game.
 
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"Making" firearms covers such a broad range of activities. Today all of the parts except the receiver are not regulated. It is possible to make ONLY the receiver and then buy the rest and you have a PMF. The amount of machining involved in a lower AR15 for example isn't too advanced. OTOH, if you're making your own barrel and chamber is a WHOLE different game.
SORTA different game.

Joe
 
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"There are over 550 million firearms
in worldwide circulation; that's one
firearm for every twelve people.
The only question is;
how do I arm the other eleven?"






Source:

 
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Quite a few States already have restrictions on privately made firearms.

So I'm curious, when they say "serial numbers for component parts" what is covered? Subassemblies? Barrels? Every single part? Are roll pins included?


How can they restrict something they can't prove exists? ;)
Yep. To avoid a takings judgement, they are grandfathering what you possess. As long as the firearm model in question existed in the revision you posses was available before 2019/2020... or whatever year... how do they prove when you got it? Visit a Nampa gun shop and buy lower components kits and uppers all day long, walking for cash.
 
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So I'm curious, when they say "serial numbers for component parts" what is covered? Subassemblies? Barrels? Every single part? Are roll pins included?



Yep. To avoid a takings judgement, they are grandfathering what you possess. As long as the firearm model in question existed in the revision you posses was available before 2019/2020... or whatever year... how do they prove when you got it? Visit a Nampa gun shop and buy lower components kits and uppers all day long, walking for cash.
I did not see any grandfathering clause in House Bill 2005, except allowance for 1968 and earlier firearms? Here is link to text of bill.

 
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Ya know, at 72 I try to avoid politics- it just raises my blood pressure. but I read something the other day that explains a lot very simply.
I did not write this. Across the world, wake up!
When I was a HS sophomore – decades ago! – my World History teacher was Mrs. Holloway, but we all called her Granny Holloway. She was a slight woman, scarcely 5 feet tall, seemingly fragile, but full of vim and vinegar….you know the type. She could speak for hours about the Fall of the Roman Empire, the Inquisition, the Industrial Revolution, and the World Wars. She never sat while she lectured, never stood at a lectern, but moved around the room making eye contact with all of her students. She was demanding too, and I can't remember how many papers were sent back to me because she would note "you can do better than this, Miss Schaal."
One day during class, an office aid interrupted her lecture to hand her a note. She read it silently, apologized, and said she needed to leave the room. We knew it had to be important because Granny Holloway stopped lectures for no one.
We sat in the room talking to one another when the door opened, and in walked Mrs. Abels, another teacher in our HS. She explained to us that Granny had been faced with an emergency, a serious one, and it was questionable if she would even be returning to finish out the semester. We were stunned. Would we get a chance to tell her goodbye? Would we get updates, so we would know she was ok? Mrs. Abels assured us that we need not worry, that Granny was safe but needed time away, and that the best thing we could do for her, and the best way we could show our devotion to her, was to be cooperative with her replacement. Mrs. Abels confirmed that she had been asked and had agreed to step in as Granny's replacement.
Cheer up, she told us, this could be a good thing. Other teachers still believed in endless homework and projects with deadlines and hard work. She would not bring that into our class. She believed in clean slates. If there were grades that we did not like, she could give us a chance to bring them up. She asked us what suggestions we had to make the semester a better learning experience. Someone mentioned that lectures were boring and we wanted more films. Done, she said. Someone else mentioned that a free day now and then would help us if we needed to catch up on work in other classes. She didn't see a problem with that. She asked us how we felt about an end-of-semester party. Um, yeah, sounded very good to us. And on and on. Mrs. Abels listened intently and agreed to all of our suggestions, continually emphasizing that her concern was that we have a good learning experience and enjoy the semester. She also reminded us that we were lucky to not be sent out to other classes where we would be working to catch up, and that of course this was all for Granny.
Near the end of the period, shortly before the bell rang, the door opened and Granny sauntered in with her usual Granny Holloway attitude. "How did they do?," she asked. "Marvelous," said Mrs. Abels. "They were completely in my hands."
Granny then faced us and said "And that, my students, is how a dictator takes over a nation. Not with guns or tanks or laws or mandates. They do it using a poster child and promises and gifts and protection from an enemy."
I can't remember a lesson all through 12 years of public school that made such an impression on me, and has stayed with me.
We are among wolves in sheep clothing, many are being deceived with a false light! I was falling for it myself until the Lord opened my eyes to see and my ears to hear.
Stay awake! And buckle up. Put on the FULL armor of God, we are going to need it in the days to come, NO man is going to "Save the World"
 

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