How to get into reloading

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Whats the best way to get into reloading? I know it’s not that great of savings right now but I would love to learn. I’ve heard it’s important to learn hands on rather then just reading about it.

Thanks for any input
 
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Yes, hands-on is best and I recall members here have classes in the Portland area.
Let's hope they see your thread and respond.
I'm not sure you know what it's all about yet, so here's a website that has vids of all the presses available today in use and loading all types of ammo.
Way better than reading a musty/old/outdated loading manual, give it a look.
jmo,
.
 
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I agree. I bought a Lee Loadmaster in 9mm and watched a ton of youtube videos. There's enough of them that you start to get an idea who's procedure you like and who doesn't appear to know all the different advice to give. It is repetative, but you develop your own preferences (e.g. what method of case cleaning). Ultimately, it isn't complicated and it is fun. And I've saved a ton of money. I reload a ton of calibers now (uh, is 5 a ton?) and I know what I'd have to do if I wanted to reload for accuracy (I currently reload for quantity).
Have fun!
 

Local Loader

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Trial and error is a great way to learn, there's just some things you can only learn by making a mistake. Start with one or two calibers first, one pistol and one rifle is a decent kickoff. Pick one you use with cheap and easy to get parts. Then start experimenting with the press and see how it feels. Get a good feel for the sizer die and then set your expander(pistol dies only) for best use. Than take several bullets and cases and get a feel for seating the bullet, each bullet type can feel different and each needing a different amount of crimp or pressure(if you choose to crimp or if cannelured or not).
 
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Local Loader

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If you need supplies (primers, powder, cases, bullets and whatever else) there is usually someone(s) here who has it or can find what you're looking for. As always feel free to ask for advice and/or help.
 

Alexx1401

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Literally anyone who can do simple repair jobs and not hurt themselves or start a fire can roll ammo. I learned with just the Book Lee wrote way back before Al invented the net. Now days? There is so many hours of video on it you could never watch it all in a lifetime. Strait wall pistol calibers are the place to start. EVERYONE who shoots should buy at least a basic set up and know how to use it. Then lay in some supplies. When there is another panic shortage you can still shoot.
 

Certaindeaf

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Whats the best way to get into reloading? I know it’s not that great of savings right now but I would love to learn. I’ve heard it’s important to learn hands on rather then just reading about it.

Thanks for any input
The "best" way is like an a-hole.

Stinky and bloody.

Good luck!
 
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Learning to reload is a little bit of a journey, I would approach it with a good pair of shoes. Accessories here & there may be considered optional by many and they help ensure your ammo is correct and within specifications. You can save money over time with reloading, and crating quality rounds should be a top priority. Order items for the caliber you shoot the most - move to other calibers as you master what you have. Videos on die setup will serve you well.
  • Loading press
  • Calipers
  • Powder Scale
  • Die set with shell holder
  • Reloading manual(s)
  • Ammo check gauge(s)
  • Bullet puller, stuck case remover
  • Components - primers, brass, powder, projectiles
  • Wet or dry brass tumbler w\media
Work in small batches to start with so the process can sink in. Measure frequently, choose reasonable loads (don't start with max charges)
Take notes on load recipes, and provide your own feedback from the range to begin fine tuning your recipe...
Dedicate time to the process & move intentionally & methodically.
 
Look around here. There a lot of threads about learning to reload.
Buy a complete reloading kit, buy a reloading manual or two (Lyman's a good one for the first one) and then READ the How To Reload section of the book.

I agree someone with experience looking over your shoulder can be an asset. But many, like me, just started and went from there.
 

HighlandLofts

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I'm sure there is some one semi-local to you that would let you come over and try their set up.
I have new to reloading people come over to learn how to reload on my setup.
I am converting my shed in to a dedicated reloading area to do reloading classes. It will be done in March or April.

I will have a Dillon 650 press, a Hornaday AP (progressive) press, two single-stage Hornaday Lock n Load presses, two RCBS ROCKCHUCKER presses, a Redding T-7 turret press, a old Lyman C-press, a Lee Turret press, a cheap lee single-stage press set up out there. When I get it done people can try them out and see what they want to get in to. .
Plus guys with single-stage set ups can come over and use the progressive presses and really crank out ammo pretty fast.

I'd suggest you start with RCBS RockChucker press, it will last you your lifetime and even if you end up going with a progressive press you will always have a need for the RockChucker press..
If you haven't bought a reloading manual yet I'd suggest the Lyman 50th to start with.

I buy mostly RCBS dies used from the classifieds on the different gun forums, gun shows and eBay.
RCBS has the very best customer service out there. Free fast replacement for their products.
I get got a new stem for my 223 resized die last week. I called RCBS on Thursday and got the new one in on Monday.

For some people reloading is just as much fun as actually shooting, for some people it is a dreaded chore.
Buy good quality equipment, pay once - cry once.
All brands if reloading equipment will make good ammo, I just personally like the RCBS, Hornady, Lyman & Redding products.
I have a little bit of Lee stuff but not much.
If you buy the Lee reloading manual get ready to read over & over & over again how he is the best and constantly slaps his own backs many times.
Like AL Gore invented the Internet,
Lee invented reloading.

If you get up to the Seattle area I am 40 miles north right up I-5. Your welcome to come over and try out my set up.
I have been buying dies in lots of calibers and brass in lots of calibers so when I start doing reloading classes I'll have the proper dies for the guys to use here.

Also if you buy a RCBS RockChucker press it has a plug where the dies screw in, you can take that plug out and put a Hornaday Lock n Load conversion plug in to make the press except the Hornaday Lock n Load bushings.
 

ageingstudent

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Literally anyone who can do simple repair jobs and not hurt themselves or start a fire can roll ammo. I learned with just the Book Lee wrote way back before Al invented the net. Now days? There is so many hours of video on it you could never watch it all in a lifetime. Strait wall pistol calibers are the place to start. EVERYONE who shoots should buy at least a basic set up and know how to use it. Then lay in some supplies. When there is another panic shortage you can still shoot.
I started metallic with 22-250:s0112:. Wish I had started with .38. I did have some pretraining stuffing shotshell for trap though. 16 with a treasure chest full of shotshell primers and red dot:s0010::p. Good times.
 

ageingstudent

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I'm sure there is some one semi-local to you that would let you come over and try their set up.
I have new to reloading people come over to learn how to reload on my setup.
I am converting my shed in to a dedicated reloading area to do reloading classes. It will be done in March or April.

I will have a Dillon 650 press, a Hornaday AP (progressive) press, two single-stage Hornaday Lock n Load presses, two RCBS ROCKCHUCKER presses, a Redding T-7 turret press, a old Lyman C-press, a Lee Turret press, a cheap lee single-stage press set up out there. When I get it done people can try them out and see what they want to get in to. .
Plus guys with single-stage set ups can come over and use the progressive presses and really crank out ammo pretty fast.

I'd suggest you start with RCBS RockChucker press, it will last you your lifetime and even if you end up going with a progressive press you will always have a need for the RockChucker press..
If you haven't bought a reloading manual yet I'd suggest the Lyman 50th to start with.

I buy mostly RCBS dies used from the classifieds on the different gun forums, gun shows and eBay.
RCBS has the very best customer service out there. Free fast replacement for their products.
I get got a new stem for my 223 resized die last week. I called RCBS on Thursday and got the new one in on Monday.

For some people reloading is just as much fun as actually shooting, for some people it is a dreaded chore.
Buy good quality equipment, pay once - cry once.
All brands if reloading equipment will make good ammo, I just personally like the RCBS, Hornady, Lyman & Redding products.
I have a little bit of Lee stuff but not much.
If you buy the Lee reloading manual get ready to read over & over & over again how he is the best and constantly slaps his own backs many times.
Like AL Gore invented the Internet,
Lee invented reloading.

If you get up to the Seattle area I am 40 miles north right up I-5. Your welcome to come over and try out my set up.
I have been buying dies in lots of calibers and brass in lots of calibers so when I start doing reloading classes I'll have the proper dies for the guys to use here.

Also if you buy a RCBS RockChucker press it has a plug where the dies screw in, you can take that plug out and put a Hornaday Lock n Load conversion plug in to make the press except the Hornaday Lock n Load bushings.
I know Dick Lee's book was a bit self-agrandizing, but I called for help (because I was a 16-year-old knucklehead) to Lee precision in like 1984 when I had some questions and he spent at least an hour on the phone with me making sure I was doing it right. Nobody else would have helped me. My Dad was a wreck at the time. It left an impression on me. And yes it was a dial phone on the wall haha.
 

3MTA3

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My advise - start simple and learn a bit before you make a big investment. It's not rocket science you just need attention to detail. I started at 12 with an early 60's Speer manual and some equipment my brother had bought used and then sold to my Dad.

The minimum you need is:
reloading manual, usually from a bullet manufacturer that gas instructions
A press
Dies
A balance beam scale
A case trimmer
Neck champfering tool
Calipers (Harbor Freight is fine)
Lube
Primers, brass, powder, bullets

Take advantage of fellow forum members with upgaditus and buy they used equipment or buy a kit new. I don't think there is any bad reloading manufacturer out there. It all seems to work just fine from budget stuff through the expensive equipment. Lee, Hornady, RCBS, Dillon. etc., it's ll good.
 
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There was a thread recently about the same topic and multiple suggestions for that person to receive reloading instruction / classes were offered, you may want to do a search for that thread... I would just add that good-quality reloading equipment will last a lifetime, so be open to buying used if you want to save some money.
Reloading is a great activity for multiple reasons.
 
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While you have been getting good advice I would like to offer some of my own - be forthcoming and honest with yourself about exactly why you want to get into reloading before you do.

I have seen far too many people get into it for their OWN wrong reasons, invest far too much money, and lose on selling what they bought without ever loading a round.

I got into reloading as an extension of my interest in guns and shooting. It has never been based on 'savings', but always that of being able to produce the best and most accurate ammo for all my guns, and to create ammo for specific purposes.

Reloading has never been a 'chore' - it has always had a 'symbiotic' relationship with my shooting and I have always enjoyed it.
 
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While you have been getting good advice I would like to offer some of my own - be forthcoming and honest with yourself about exactly why you want to get into reloading before you do.

I have seen far too many people get into it for their OWN wrong reasons, invest far too much money, and lose on selling what they bought without ever loading a round.

I got into reloading as an extension of my interest in guns and shooting. It has never been based on 'savings', but always that of being able to produce the best and most accurate ammo for all my guns, and to create ammo for specific purposes.

Reloading has never been a 'chore' - it has always been a 'symbiotic' relationship with my shooting and I have always enjoyed it.
I want to get into it to have a greater understanding of shooting. Not to save money but to up my knowledge of ballistics and shooting and a hobby for the winter weather.
 

Local Loader

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One thing that I don't think get mentioned much is if you want to be able to have your press mobile or not(most are not). I set mine up to be mobile so I can take it to the range with me to make test loads and test them. Don't get to go to the range a lot so this is useful for me, so something to think about.
 

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