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How does someone find a hunting partner/mentor?

Discussion in 'Northwest Hunting' started by C&H, Aug 19, 2010.

  1. C&H

    C&H SW Portland Member

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    I'm newish to shooting, and I would really like to go hunting (for just about anything I can eat). It always seems that the best advice I read on this forum and others is accompanied by the suggestion to go out with a partner who knows what they're doing. That sounds great, but how the heck do I find one?

    I grew up in a conservative home, but there was no shooting or hunting. I grew into a liberal man and live in SW Portland - and I haven't met any hunters. I know plenty of liberals that are in the same boat. None of us have the money or can get wife approval for a thousand (or several) dollar guided trip to help us figure out what we're doing, and the only hunters we know are grandparents (the few that have them left), and none of them are really up to hunting or even talking about it for more than five minutes.

    So, two issues here...
    #1 Politics are getting in the way of bringing lefties into shooting sports. I've never taken a liberal shooting that didn't change their mind about guns and gun owners, but I'm only one person.

    #2 How do I find a hunting mentor?
    I really want to hunt duck, deer, goose, rabbit, or any upland bird - but if you've got a line on something else, that's fine too. I've mentioned politics a few times in this thread, but if you want to hunt with me I would be absolutely thrilled to call politics off limits for conversation. Who needs all the jibber jabber anyway?

    (I'll post this now, but I'll be off shooting for a few hours and won't be able to respond until I'm back)
     
  2. mudslinging79

    mudslinging79 oregn Member

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    well, im looking for someone to go hunting with myself...
     
  3. unionguy

    unionguy Portland Active Member

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    I spent several years politely mentioning to every hunter that I met "if you ever want to take a new guy out to teach, let me know". No takers. At a gunshow, I even asked the Oregon Hunters Heritage Association, and they just said "keep on asking people"! I think most hunters have their friends/family that they go with every year for many years, so having a new guy out is sorta like having a stranger over for Christmas dinner.

    Last year, a friend and I just decided to go out and hunt on our own after reading some books and watching a few videos. We didn't get a deer, but we learned a lot and had a great time. I plan to keep doing this and just teach myself.

    If there are any hunters here willing to teach us new guys, please count me in!:)
     
  4. caden08

    caden08 washougal Member

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    Do you remember the Cheney incident a few years ago? I think the same Q was asked :laugh:

    Jk
     
  5. OPAWY

    OPAWY NorthCentral Wyoming Member

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    Its a shame you're not in NorthCentral Wyoming. You'd be able to go hunting with me. I'm an old gal whose hunted by herself most times, every year. I've taken relatives and nieghbors out hunting. Come on Oregon guys, take a couple newbies out hunting. You want this sport and tradition to continue? Then do your part.
     
  6. Mutoman

    Mutoman North Bend Active Member

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    Thanks, that one made my day! :bluelaugh:
     
  7. Mutoman

    Mutoman North Bend Active Member

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    Hunting groups are kind of a private club that are very hard to get acceptance into. You may try the geriatric approach and find some old guy (or old gal) that will share the knowledge with you. You may have to drive him around in the woods and haul his kills out for him, but I'm sure the knowledge and company will be well worth it.

    My hunting days are limited to driving my dad around; he can't do much walking anymore. I still get to spend time with my dad though and that's worth a whole lot more than any old buck.
     
  8. OPAWY

    OPAWY NorthCentral Wyoming Member

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    For some of us, its just about putting meat on the table. Nothing exclusive about it.
     
  9. Taurus 617 CCW

    Taurus 617 CCW Northern Idaho Member

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    I have found several guys though my local church that I could go hunting with. You may take a look there. I would also get in tough with the Oregon Hunter's Association and see if they have any further advice. You could also attend one of their monthly meetings in your area.
     
  10. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Yes, there are hunters and groups of hunters that are extremely protective of their areas, and understandably would be reluctant to take someone they don't really know into the field for reasons of safety, enjoyment of the experience, etc. Hunting is not like tennis or golf or handball (at least in my opinion). For many, it is a private and/or intimate thing that is cherished and held close to the heart, to be shared with those just as close.

    Now, having said that, hunting is also replete with gregarious, willing individuals (OPAWY step forward and receive your accolades!) who would like nothing better than to teach and share what is so important to them.

    Taurus came awful close to the perfect solution for you, and I will expand on that: Join and become active in a hunting organization. OHA, RMEF, Ducks Unlimited, etc. Show the veterans there that you are an energetic participant in doing the work that is necessary to keep that organization going, and not just a "dues payer" along for the ride. Out of respect for those protective of their sport, don't be too aggressive in trying to find a mentor. He (or she) will seek you out when they see that you are a Walk-the- Walk type of person. They will want to have you in their camp as an asset that can add to their experience. This process will not take very long if you invest your energy toward what you seek.
     
  11. GRUNDEL

    GRUNDEL Washougal Area Active Member

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    +1 :thumbup:
     
  12. OPAWY

    OPAWY NorthCentral Wyoming Member

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    Yes, your words are right on point. Having reread this thread, I feel that I was hasty in making some of my points. Particularly safety, and also getting to know the character of those wanting to try out hunting. Others have so sussinctly brought these points up, and to them, I am grateful. Yes, I have heard horror stories about the nicest guy at the job, becoming the most dangerous, and lazy guy on the hunt. But because I have been fortunate to have been with some pretty conscientious newbies, who knew the hunting laws, were accurate and safe with their rifles, and were always ready and willing to do their part, I forgot about the horror stories.
     
  13. Trick

    Trick St Helens Active Member

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    My first piece of advise would be to make sure you have Hunter Safety if your brand new into the sport. It isn't mandatory in Oregon over the age of 18, but if you lack the experience it is a good idea.

    Watch a few videos, read a few books, look over some good maps and get out there. The best way to learn is to make a whole bunch of mistakes (non-fatal ones).

    The scariest part for me was cleaning and processing the animals, but after you do it a couple times it gets a whole bunch easier.

    I think one reason it's hard to find partners is because we are all on such a tight schedule. I barely get any time to scout with family and work obligations. I usually go in dry every year with my fingers crossed. Sometimes it works out.....sometimes it doesn't.

    It is an expensive sport. Once you factor in gear costs (gun, ammo, knives, packboards, game bags, GPS, radios, boots, cloths, licences, gambrels, rope and other items), gas, food, etc....the price per pound is outrageous.

    But on the flip side you will be consuming very healthy, lean, organic, hormones/drug free meat. You just can't purchase this purity in a store.

    Don't give up.....the first few years can be frustrating. Just enjoy and reflect on your time in the woods....that is where the true value lies.
     
  14. pyromancer

    pyromancer Portland Freelance Graphic Designer Bronze Supporter

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    My grandfather, and my great uncle used to teach hunters safety. My great uncle told me a couple stories about going hunting with his students. Have you considered taking a hunters safety course and asking the instructor about finding someone to go hunting with?
     
  15. nw17hmr

    nw17hmr Willamette Valley New Member

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    I would add one other point to the good ones already posted. Spend the time on the range to get very familiar with whatever firearm you intend to hunt with, rifle or shotgun. You have to be able to finish the hunt successfully whether it is a buck at 150 yds or a pheasant that flushed at an angle shot. Going hunting is good, shooting is better, taking game home is the best.
     
  16. eldbillbo

    eldbillbo clackamas New world samurai and a redneck none the less Bronze Supporter

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    a big +1 for hunters safety course . No one in there right mind would take a stranger out who has not completed one .

    I offered to take a couple guys hunting from this board last year one turned out to be a nut bag and the other ended up having to work.

    i won't be making that offer this year since i drew eastern tags but next year i'm forming my own western elk party for the years i don't draw eastern tags

    a far less successful hunt than deer but a much bigger and better tasting prize.
     
  17. Twodogs

    Twodogs portland Or Active Member

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    I wouldn't mind giving someone a little help learning how to hunt I don't bird hunt,just Deer,elk and predators.
    So if anyone wants a few pointers let me know.
     
  18. Somenewguy

    Somenewguy OR New Member

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    what sucks is i live in oregon and all my friends that want to take me live in washington. So i get screwed by the out of state tag fees. If anyone knows of a loophole in that i'd like to know.
     
  19. Intoodeep

    Intoodeep Beaverton, OR Member

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    I would second the hunters safety course and if you're really interested in learning to hunt you'll have to put in some work.
    I would first read up as much as possible, ask questions that lead you to resources to educate yourself. No one want to assist a unknown new hunter who is looking for quick answers and doesn't show a little work ethic. A good source that help guide you along would be Ifish.net there you will find all kinds of hunters who will show you the level of respect you put into learning how to hunt. You can get recommendation on books and other resources and even find a hunting mentor after you are a participating member for a while; there is no love for a guy who comes in unknown asking for mentor-ship out of the gate.
    I'm willing to help out if I can but I'll be hunting the East side this year.
     
  20. eldbillbo

    eldbillbo clackamas New world samurai and a redneck none the less Bronze Supporter

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    Just pay the extra . its better hunting on the other side of the river because its better managed