Koda

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They've always been a real pain to adjust and I end up marring them. Ive tried searching but I dont even know what these are called. I scoured knifekits.com and think these are called "slotted post". Not super helpful finding a tool for them though....

So I dont keep screwing myself over...

What is the proper tool needed to adjust this kind of hardware, the slotted post?

Selection_001.jpg
 
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But if you want to spend money and not use it . . .

 

Stomper

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They've always been a real pain to adjust and I end up marring them. Ive tried searching but I dont even know what these are called. I scoured knifekits.com and think these are called "slotted post". Not super helpful finding a tool for them though....

So I dont keep screwing myself over...

What is the proper tool needed to adjust this kind of hardware, the slotted post?

View attachment 1234091
That’s what’s referred to as an “open hole Chicago Screw”, and you should adjust the torque from the other side to get more bite using a pair of screwdrivers with a blade wide enough and thick enough to fill the slots without any real slop.
 

Koda

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That’s what’s referred to as an “open hole Chicago Screw”, and you should adjust the torque from the other side to get more bite using a pair of screwdrivers with a blade wide enough and thick enough to fill the slots without any real slop.
been "finagling" these that way for years but keep marring them up. I don't have a flat blade screwdriver large enough and need a 3rd hand to support the holster.

Id go to the hardware store to buy the proper screwdriver but theres gotta be a technique to adjusting these with only 2 hands.
 

Koda

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But if you want to spend money and not use it . . .

I think this is on the right path by the slots in my hardware are flat not curved.
 
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Um...what is on the other side of that slotted post?

The ones on my holster are the receiving nut to a Phillips screw. So I use a #2 Phillips screwdriver to do the tightening from the other side, and a flat bladed screwdriver to keep the nut from turning. And it's better if you have a screwdriver with a blade that fits perfectly. But I never tighten from that side. Because, as you're aware, there's not a ton for the flat blade to bite into.

Also, once you get it tightened to where you want it, Vibra Tite VC-3 thread locker is fantastic stuff. It's designed for screws that may need to be periodically adjusted and/or removed. You can adjust it five times before the screw needs to be recoated.

 

Koda

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Um...what is on the other side of that slotted post?

The ones on my holster are the receiving nut to a Phillips screw. So I use a #2 Phillips screwdriver to do the tightening from the other side, and a flat bladed screwdriver to keep the nut from turning. And it's better if you have a screwdriver with a blade that fits perfectly. But I never tighten from that side. Because, as you're aware, there's not a ton for the flat blade to bite into.

Also, once you get it tightened to where you want it, Vibra Tite VC-3 thread locker is fantastic stuff. It's designed for screws that may need to be periodically adjusted and/or removed. You can adjust it five times before the screw needs to be recoated.

the other side is a phillips screw, I tighten from that side. I put a flat blade screwdriver in a bench vise and align it and push on it while turning the phillips but its difficult and slips off. I need to tighten this one and it just wont anymore, I think the mfg put loctite on it.
 
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the other side is a phillips screw, I tighten from that side. I put a flat blade screwdriver in a bench vise and align it and push on it while turning the phillips but its difficult and slips off. I need to tighten this one and it just wont anymore, I think the mfg put loctite on it.
If there's loctite on it, you may need to hit it with a soldering iron to heat it up and break it free. Hopefully they didn't use red. Be glad it didn't come from Daniel Defense. The guys at Daniel Defense LOVE RED loctite in a really unnatural way. Like the way a boy from Kentucky loves his cousin. IT AIN'T NATURAL I TELL YA!

I also usually wedge the holster in-between my knees and then have a screwdriver in each hand.

Good luck! And may the odds be ever in your favor!
 
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the other side is a phillips screw, I tighten from that side. I put a flat blade screwdriver in a bench vise and align it and push on it while turning the phillips but its difficult and slips off. I need to tighten this one and it just wont anymore, I think the mfg put loctite on it.
This is why you are having so much troube marring the screws. Use a short flat blade screw driver, do it in your lap not the vice.

Joe
 

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