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Hollywood die help

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by RVTECH, Feb 24, 2012.

  1. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    I have a Hollywood .223 die marked 'TC' which I assume is carbide. Also it appears the actual sizing portion of the die is pressed in the body which again I assume is made of Tungsten Carbide. The problem is it does not 'act' like a TC sizer in that the cases do not run smoothly through it and I have had to pull two stuck cases from it after I pulled the rims off the cases. Lubing the cases solves the problem but negates the original reason for a TC die. Any help will be appreciated.
     
  2. HappyRoman

    HappyRoman Sherwood Forest Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    THE LENGHT OF THE 223 CARTRIDGE OR Most other rifle cartidges dictates that they be lubed. Even Dillon tungsten dies for rifles indicate you will need to lube. When I have forgotten to lube, I have had to use the broken case extractor to remove the then battered case.. LUBE cases and all will be well, reinventing the wheel will not make this one work better.. sorry,,
     
  3. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    The .223 has body taper... you must lube, I learned this the hard way with .30 carbine carbide dies.

    The only dies that do not require lubrication are straight-wall pistol dies. The reason for this, is they only interact with a small portion of the case at a time, making it easy to overcome friction, in the case of tapered wall and bottleneck cases (.223 and .30 carbine, and .308 win etc) have a substantially higher amount of surface area interacting with the die at the same time. This means in order to overcome that friction you still need lube.

    Also, be just as careful about excessive lube, a lot of these dies will fill up and start giving you lube dents even worse than you get with steel dies. The lanolin based spray on lubes work the best, followed closely by imperial sizing wax. You can either buy the commercial stuff, or make your own by going to the health-food store buying some lanolin, and getting some 91% alcohol at the drug store. (1oz lanolin 16oz 91% isopropyl)
     
  4. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the help! I figured it had to be something like that but was not really sure. Unfortunately I only have the resizing die and not the decapper/expander ball that goes with it so it is little more than a paperweight unless I can find the 'internals' for it.
     
  5. PaulZ

    PaulZ Oregon City Active Member

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    I have no experience but, I read some advice to polish the inside of your dies with metal polish. Have you checked Ebay for
    "internals"? there seems to be a lot of parts there
     
  6. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Might have to do that. This is a very nice resizing die and I would like to use it. If nothing else I might make an adapter to use an RCBS expander/decapper assembly (which I have a few of).
     
  7. Kevatc

    Kevatc Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I thought TC meant taper crimp? I guess on a sizing die this wouldn't make sense.
     
  8. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    Depending on the type of press you have, and how you use your dies, typically when processing brass, I don't decap in the sizing station, and instead run a universal decapper first, however my idea of a universal decapper in this case is a worn out .223 sizing die that I drilled out to work as a decapper. Also, for neck expansion, I typically run another worn out sizing die that just has an expander ball in it towards the top, with the neck/body section drilled out. This way I am doing the expansion in the power stroke of the press. This kind of tweak is very necessary when you're doing case prep on a 1050 or any press which has a really crappy compound power stroke. You won't notice any advantage to doing it this way on presses that have the double crank slider mechanism with a long idle link.
     
  9. PaulZ

    PaulZ Oregon City Active Member

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    That brings up another question for me ; How do you tell when a sizing die is worn out?
     
  10. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    When they no longer size the cartridge to the dimensions they should be. The number 1 problem I have is dies becoming too scratched to continue using, and if I buff them out one more time they will be over-sized. Most bottle-neck rifle dies wear out near the leading edges, so you will get cases where the necks tend to be somewhat conical, and the web of the case isn't being resized properly.

    Scratching is another common problem, I have a die I use for casting lead cherries, which I cover in very fine valve grinding compound, chuck the die up in the lathe and using the tail stock run the cherry in and polish it out.
     
    PaulZ and (deleted member) like this.
  11. PaulZ

    PaulZ Oregon City Active Member

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    Thanks AMP