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Here's an Original: 7mm vs 300

Discussion in 'Northwest Hunting' started by Dan360, Oct 5, 2009.

  1. Dan360

    Dan360 Olympia, WA Member

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    All of my rifles are blued with walnut stocks. All are in very nice condition. I have found myself babying them a bit in nasty weather and I will usually check my rifle for scratches before I stop my own bleeding after a nasty fall. So, I've decided I want a do-most-of-it rifle for open country deer hunting, elk hunting and hopefully in the future, a caribou hunt in Alaska and an antelope hunt in Wyoming.

    For the type of hunting that I do and I want to do, flat shooting and an ability to get through wind are important. I would like to stick to the 7mm or 30 calibers because my current rifles are chambered in 7x57 and 30-06. I figure if I buy another 7mm or 30 caliber, I could use some of the same bullets I already reload in my other rifles instead of buying another caliber or buy additional cleaning supplies.

    For the 7mm Rem Mag, I'd probably use 140 or 150gr bullets on deer and 175gr for elk. Or, I'd cut the difference and use 160gr for everything.

    In a 300 Win Mag, I'd probably load 165gr for deer and antelope and 180 or 200gr bullets for elk.

    Would there be an appreciable difference between these two calibers as far as trajectory and their ability to cleanly take game past the 300 yard mark? Regardless of which one, I'm probably going to end up with an M700 XCR. I've found that the 300 Win Mag is usually priced $150 more expensive than the same rifle in 7mm Rem Mag when I look online.

    What do you guys think? Is the 300 worth the extra $150?
     
  2. the4thshake

    the4thshake Portland Active Member

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    The 300 will shoot the 200+ grain bullets. The heavy bullets are the ticket for cheating wind at long distances. Using bullets of similar weight, the 300 and 7mm have a similar trajectory. Both will work just fine but the 300 will punch a bigger hole. If it were my choice I would listen to my shoulder and stick with a 30-06.
     
  3. tinman

    tinman portland Member

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    Iwould never use a 300 for deer. To me a 7mm is pushing it for deer but I do hunt with a guy that shoots a 7mm for deer and elk. He is a good shot andwill not shoot if he can't get the shot he wants.
    Placing the shot is the key and having the ability to pass one up if you can't get the shot is also important.
     
  4. Logical1

    Logical1 southeast portland, OR Member

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    I use my 30-06 for everything, not to hijack the thread or anything. I have a 7mm and I like the way it shoots. but with out fail I take the 30-06 with 150 grain for deer and 180 grain for elk. its a great rifle and going with a 7mm or a 300 doesnt have a dramatic gain over the 30-06 in my opinion. just my 2 cents
     
  5. bwells

    bwells Longview Member

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    My vote would be for a 300. It's a little much for deer, but you could load a lower velocity deer load if you're worried about it, or Remington has a managed recoil load. I used mine for antelope in Montana last year, and it worked well with very little meat damage.
     
  6. Dan360

    Dan360 Olympia, WA Member

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    I think I'm going 300. The way I look at it, a 300 magnum of some sort will shot as flat or flatter than a 270 and arrive on target with 30 caliber mass. I want this rifle to be the rifle I depend on when I've spent the money on a hunt and I want all of the margin of error I can get. A 300 Win Mag or 300 WSM can push 150 or 165gr bullets well over 3100 fps and drop as much as 10 inches less than a 30-06 at the 400 yard line. I really like my 30-06 as well, but I don't view it as a cross-canyon elk rifle. My 30-06 also doesn't like light bullets very much so I stick to 180gr bullets for everything. Its dropping 25 inches at 400 with its favorite load.

    In the end, its more of a confidence thing. It may not make a difference to the game animal, but it might make some difference to my mind. Peace of mind is nice when the buck of a lifetime shows himself.
     
  7. USMC1911

    USMC1911 Salem Active Member

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    Seems to me the question answered itself. 300 mag
     
  8. the4thshake

    the4thshake Portland Active Member

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    Don't let me talk you out of the 300 mag....but to put your comment on bullet drop into perspective:

    180gr 30-06 180gr 300 win mag

    100yd zero zero
    200yd -2.9 -1.9
    300yd -12.0 -9.0
    400yd -28.3 -22.0
    500yd -53.0 -41.7
    600yd -87.4 -69.3

    At 400 yards you will have to dial in 5.5 MOA of elevation to make the hit with the 300 win mag. The 30-06 will require 7 MOA to make the same shot. The shot is well beyond point blank for either of the two cartriges. What difference does 6 more clicks really make?

    Even with a 200yard zero, both cartridges are only point blank to 300 yards on a deer sized animal.

    By all means, get the 300 win mag. I just wanted to show a comparison for sake of discussion.
     
  9. Dan360

    Dan360 Olympia, WA Member

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    I don't intend to make corrections with my scope for elevation or windage. I'll choose a 200 or 250 yard zero and stick with it. There will be holdover with either cartridge at the 400 yard line. The difference will probably be 5 inches with comparable bullets between the 300 and 30-06. A deer is probably about 16 inches from brisket to backline. With a 250 yard zero, I'll be able to hold on hair and not worry too much about the highest point of the bullet's trajectory at closer ranges.

    Another issue is energy. Federal shows that the 300 WSM maintains over 2000 fp of energy at 400 yards while the 30-06 drops to 1660 fp at that same range with both using 180gr Nosler Accubond. Probably won't make a difference on deer, but I'd feel a bit better about the shot on an elk.
     
  10. BooKilla

    BooKilla Portland, OR Member

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    I have both calibers in the same rifle. 700 SPS

    The 7mm is a great round for something that is cheap to purchase and shoots relatively flat. With 150gr. you are going to get 3100 velocity and muzzle energy is around 3200. It is a great white tail and mule deer rifle. You can take small elk.

    The 300 WSM is the best round I have ever shot. My groups are rediculous at 200 yards and it shoots seriously flat. I wouldn't hesitate to reach out and touch someone/something at 700 yards. I would need to change my optics, but with free floatings barrels, people are in benchrest competitions with the 300 WSM at 1500 yards. You can easily take any size elk, brown bear and moose. I would go larger for dangerous game such as cape buffalo, tigers, lion, etc.

    The muzzle energy on a 300 WSM 180gr. is 3620. Yet is doesn't have that bad of recoil. Get the 300 and you'll be a happy shooter.
     
  11. OregonJohn

    OregonJohn Sutherlin, Or Bronze Life Member #1 Lifetime Supporter

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    300WSM, one shot kill,l 270 yards, 165 gr Barnes tripple shock. I have now moved up to the 325WSM and the 375 Ruger.
     
  12. 284guy

    284guy Woodburn Member

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    300 win mag. far superior to the wsm. sure, factory loads look fairly close but the bigger winchester case allows you to do a lot more. Although i wouldnt recommend it as the best load I have an older Ruger that I can load a 200gr sierra boattail to 3005fps! Thats smokin. The Browning I recently picked up wont allow loads that hot without high pressure signs. Heavy bullets knock game down, the heavier, the more energy transfered to the animal. I own both 7mags and 300's and Ill take the 300's anyday, even over my 338 or 375 for elk. just my .02
     
  13. motoman98

    motoman98 Gresham, OR Active Member

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    Our hunting party has shot elk, using a spotter, at fairly long distance. I've seen the wound effects of the 7mm Rem mag and the .308 Norma mag at 600+ yds.
    There is a very big difference, more than you'd think. I switched from the 7mm at that point.
    It (the 7mmMag)really shines for long distance shots on slightly smaller game.
    I now shoot the .300 Weatherby Mag for Elk hunting
    Published loads put the 200gr Nosler Partition to 3060fps!
     
  14. orduckhunter

    orduckhunter Springfield, OR Member

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    I also shoot Barnes Triple Shocks out of my 300

    I love it that I can shoot a lighter bullet that ends up weighing as much or more than many other heavier bullets
     
  15. WhyteCheddar

    WhyteCheddar East of Moscow by the Willamette Well-Known Member

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    Actually, the 7mm will take ANY size elk.
    The type of bullet and placement is going to be the difference. IMHO its mostly what you have confidence in that matters. If you feel you are a confident dead eye with the .300 then thats your 'huckleberry'.
    Top notch optics will also make a HUGE difference.
     
  16. bwells

    bwells Longview Member

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    I've been shooting 165gr. Ballistic Tips out of my 300 recently for deer. Last year I took a pronghorn in Montana at 289 yards with that gun. Zeroed about an inch high at 100, I held on the backline. I hit him high, but still caught both lungs. I was surprised at how little meat damage there was. I like the 165, but I usually carry 180gr. partitions for elk.
     
  17. Dan360

    Dan360 Olympia, WA Member

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    I'll be going with the 300. I'm looking mostly at the 300 WSM because I can get it in a shorter and lighter package without losing too much perfomance. Methinks a 165 TSX will get it done for just about everything. I'll load the TSX and 150gr TTSX and see what happens :)
     
  18. OregonJohn

    OregonJohn Sutherlin, Or Bronze Life Member #1 Lifetime Supporter

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    Methinks you are a smart guy. Anyone who can bad mouth a 300 WSM, has never owned one. I moved up to the 325 WSM and only use the 200 gr Barnes tripple shock bullet in it. I have it in a Browning X-Bolt Medallion. Very nice gun, light weight, excellent factory trigger, and priced at under 800, stainless under 900. Barnes 200 gr bullets at 2800 fps, bullets touching at 200 yards. I know this sound like BS, but this is what the gun does. John
     
  19. bwells

    bwells Longview Member

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    300wsm is a good round. My brother has a Kimber in 300wsm, and he has used on pronghorn and feral hogs. I talked to him last night and yesterday he took a large sow (he's in Louisiana) with a 220gr. partition. He said she was facing him at about 50 yards, and when she dipped her head he hit her where the neck meets the shoulders. The bullet traveled the entire length of the body. He said this pig is over five feet long.
     
  20. turq

    turq Molino,oregon Member

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    So did you decide and buy one ?
    I've been considering a Rem. Model Seven in 300 WSM xcr Camo 22"Fluted so tell 'us' how you did it.