Help identifying fish?

Discussion in 'Northwest Fishing' started by taylor, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. taylor

    taylor
    Willamette Valley
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    About 1 month ago after the big rains, I was walking past mill creek bridge on Winter st N.E. in downtown Salem and I looked down and there was hundreds of huge fish just hanging out there.
    I've walked by this bridge for 10 years and never seen 1 fish, and here was hundreds.
    Here is the description; they were about 18-24" long with a bright yellow blaze along the side. Their head was catfish shaped a wide mouth. They ate all the algae in sight and would get in groups of 3 or 4 and wiggle rapidly together.
    They were the neighborhood mystery for about 2 weeks then in they disappeared.
    What was that about?
     
  2. OreShooter

    OreShooter
    Portland
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    You might try one of the fishing forums or Oregon Dept of Fish and Wildlife. What you describe sounds like some kind of catfish species, but I don't recall seeing one with a bright yellow blaze.
     
  3. sandman1212

    sandman1212
    NW Oregon
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    The fish that you are describing sound like Carp. They are common in Oregon in lakes and streams. I have caught many. Look them up and you will probably find what you are looking for.
     
  4. BANE

    BANE
    Battle Ground WA.
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    I would say Crap also..
     
  5. Capn Jack

    Capn Jack
    Wet-Stern Washington
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    I would say Crap also.. .

    Me too, if I had a stream, or lake full of CARP :laugh:
     
  6. BANE

    BANE
    Battle Ground WA.
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    Just saying what they taste like :thumbup:
    Crappy Carp!
     
  7. OEDub

    OEDub
    SW OR Coast
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    From your description, what you saw was most likely a sucker. They are native & common to our rivers/streams. Its most likely a Large-scale Sucker from the description of the school size. Check this out for ID: Oregon Large Scale Sucker .
     
  8. cetme

    cetme
    oregon city
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    sounds like spawning carp to me
     
  9. Toxic6

    Toxic6
    Higher then a PDX hipster (~10,000 ft higher)
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    carp.....nasty garbage fish, but some people eat them.

    Speaking of suckmo's, ever seen plecho's that have gotten loose in open water? I've seen em in drainage ditches after the summer irrigation season ends and they are pretty scary looking at around 10-12 inches lol.
     
  10. taylor

    taylor
    Willamette Valley
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    I looked at the pictures of the Suckers and it might have been them, but more yellowy on the sides. The text says they are an indication of a clean stream or creek as they won't hang around pollution. Maybe the creeks downtown are coming back.
     
  11. nwwoodsman

    nwwoodsman
    Vernonia
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    If you weren't down town I'd call 'em target practice
     
  12. Mark W.

    Mark W.
    Silverton, OR
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    Koi. Carp and Goldfish are all the same family. Though goldfish are now considered a separate species.
     
  13. bmont

    bmont
    Hillsboro
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    I'm thinkin they were sucker fish
     
  14. Dunerunner

    Dunerunner
    You'll Never Know
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    Could have been Squawfish or Northern Pikeminnow as they are called today.
     
  15. fry

    fry
    pacific north west
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    dont know what they were, but the "wiggling together" is called spawning.
     
  16. SnackCracker

    SnackCracker
    Lake oswego, OR
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    They were suckers. They come up the streams in July-august to spawn. There can be hundreds or even thousands. They will *flash* to their side and flash a gold shimmer. They are usually about 12-18 inches long, but can appear larger in the water.
     

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