JavaScript is disabled
Our website requires JavaScript to function properly. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser settings before proceeding.
Caution toward a sale can also be shown (after the fact) to have been unnecessary.

I was a table-holder at a Kalispell show some years back and had a number of high-end optics on the table for sale.

Late on the last day of the show, a guy came by in a worn quilted flannel and Aussie oilskin hat, late 60's. Spoke politely with a deep Southern accent, looked over what I had, picked out 5 scopes saying, "I'll take these." Shocked and happy at the same time, I talked a bit more about the scopes, and he pulled out a checkbook.

I had to turn him down respectfully, and explained my reasons for caution, he pleaded a bit, then politely said he understood. We talked a bit further, and I mentioned I was staying south of town about 20 miles and his eyes lit up. He said his house was in the same area, and could I drop by with the scopes after the show? He'd have cash.

No sweat! (This was big money for me.)

Given directions, I climb a road up the 2nd tallest mountain between Kalispell and Polson (the tallest is a ski resort). Arriving at a huge cobblestone turnaround centered by a twelve-foot bronze sculpture of a Golden Eagle doing a full wingover, a full-size Hummer and a Town Car. The house was no less impressive, my partner and I were invited in, and flat-screen TV's blared from every room.

"Watchin' the Alabama game!" as he turned down the volume. Gave us the dime-tour of his place, including the next little mountain over (where he had a 1000-yard gong set up to shoot at from the house).

In his office, we made the deal, and I learned he was a retired Federal Judge from Alabama.

We corresponded by email for a couple years. A friendship that began with mistrust on my part.
Sound like a dream I'd love to have.
 
A buyer asking me to take payments is basically asking me to loan him money.

I would tell the buyer to ask one of his friends or family members to loan him the money, instead of me. Then he can pay me the cash up front.

If his family or friends won't loan him the money, or if he's unwilling to ask family or friends for the loan, then there's obviously a problem of some sort that I am not able to discern because I don't know anything about him.

So I won't "loan" him the money via "taking payments" (even if I hold the firearm until it's paid off).

TWYLALTR

Cheers
 
A buyer asking me to take payments is basically asking me to loan him money.

I would tell the buyer to ask one of his friends or family members to loan him the money, instead of me. Then he can pay me the cash up front.

If his family or friends won't loan him the money, or if he's unwilling to ask family or friends for the loan, then there's obviously a problem of some sort that I am not able to discern because I don't know anything about him.

So I won't "loan" him the money via "taking payments" (even if I hold the firearm until it's paid off).

TWYLALTR

Cheers
What does
mean?
 
Not for me as a seller.

BUT: If you want to do it, KEEP THE GUN UNTIL FULL PAYMENT IS IN HAND. Otherwise, forget it.

If the buyer flakes before full payment is tendered, do what you think is fair. BUT: He owes you for wasting your time and temporarily taking your merchandise off the market.

Write it all down.
Agree ^^^
I would not take on the burden.
I would also wonder about the decision-making capability and flake potential of the individual that is wanting a payment plan.
 
On other boards, comprised of real gun collectors, an honest and trusting bunch, it happens often. It is routine to send a gun even before payment is received. And other times, yes, we do accept an offer of payments.

I wont say I've never done it here, but with the pikers frequenting this forum, it would happen far less often. In fairness, there are knowledgeable folks on this forum I've dealt with many times, and I've learned to trust enough to accept a payment deal.

I will say also, although I have been stood up by flakes on this forum, countless times, I have never lost a nickel.




.
 
Last Edited:
On other boards, comprised of real gun collectors, an honest and trusting bunch, it happens often. It is routine to send a gun even before payment is received. And other times, yes, we do accept an offer of payments.

I wont say I've never done it here, but with the pikers frequenting this forum, it would happen far less often. In fairness, there are knowledgeable folks on this forum I've dealt with many times, and I've learned to trust enough to accept a payment deal.

I will say also, although I have been stood up by flakes on this forum, countless times, I have never lost a nickel.




.
Thanks for saying this. To be honest, I'd never do it here. This is on another forum where folks are a bit more serious.
 
I wouldn't accept payments on a firearm. If they don't pay up, how do you recover it?

An alternative would be to accept a non-refundable deposit to hold it for an agreed period until they save up the purchase price, and have a written contract detailing this.

I've only once accepted payments (a vehicle, not a firearm) and the guy ripped me off. I had to chase him through small claims court for 3 years before he paid up. (Easy to get a judgement, hard to collect.) It was extremely satisfying when his lawyer met me on the steps of the county courthouse and handed me a stack of hundreds.

Lessons learned: Don't accept payments. If you do, retain the title and a key until final payment is made. Specify in a written contract that ownership doesn't transfer until then. Specify penalties for late or missing payments. Specify that buyer has to keep you advised of his current address and phone number. Hide an Apple Airtag in the car.
 
...Lessons learned: Don't accept payments. If you do, retain the title and a key until final payment is made. Specify in a written contract that ownership doesn't transfer until then. Specify penalties for late or missing payments. Specify that buyer has to keep you advised of his current address and phone number. Hide an Apple Airtag in the car.
Fixed it for ya. ;)
 
would also wonder about the decision-making capability and flake potential of the individual that is wanting a payment plan
This was in my mind as well. If $300 is a problem purchase, maybe a review of priorities is in order. I mean, it likely isn't a life or death situation is he's planning on being around to make all the payments.
 
I've done it twice. Once on a local forum for $5K. 2nd on a national forum for $2K.
I got full payment before the guns transferred. Buyers wanted the item but didnt have the free cash at that time.
 
No. Especially not on a commodity item. Multiple P2P payment services offer credit lines at this point, if they won't extend that service to someone, why would I?
 
I would have no problem taking payments, under these circumstances:

1. Buyer is a member of the forum in good standing with good feedback on previous transactions.
2. Short term only - not to exceed 6 months, preferably 3 or less.
3. The gun will not transfer to the new owner until paid in full.
4. A percentage of the payment is non refundable (TBD based on total price of purchase)
5. Not going to give them a crazy low price for the firearm like I might entertain with a straight cash purchase.
 

Upcoming Events

Centralia Gun Show
Centralia, WA
Klamath Falls gun show
Klamath Falls, OR
Oregon Arms Collectors April 2024 Gun Show
Portland, OR
Albany Gun Show
Albany, OR

New Resource Reviews

New Classified Ads

Back Top