Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Gun safe weight and manufactured homes

Discussion in 'Gun Safes & Secure Storage' started by Joe Link, Feb 13, 2015.

  1. Joe Link

    Joe Link Portland, OR Well-Known Member Staff Member Lifetime Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    6,269
    Likes Received:
    4,544
    A relative who lives in a manufactured home is currently shopping for a gun safe. He called to ask me if I had heard of any issues with the floor not being able to support the weight of a proper 1100lb gun safe. I hadn't, but I can see how it might be an issue. He doesn't have a good alternative aside from inside the home.

    Anyone have any experience here?
     
  2. ZA_Survivalist

    ZA_Survivalist Oregon AK's all day.

    Messages:
    4,653
    Likes Received:
    5,766
    They sell these awesome adjustable support blocks you can set up in the crawlspace. It aids in supporting the main joist OR supporting a safe that would otherwise be too heavy if left for a long period of time or loaded heavily. Ill have the name of them here soon when I get to the office if interested.
     
    F2CMaDMaXX, etrain16 and Joe Link like this.
  3. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    12,912
    Likes Received:
    19,563
    I have cut in many an upgraded HVAC system into manufactured homes and the floor structures aren't "chinsy". An 1100lbs safe should have a decent enough sized footprint that the weight will be dispersed enough not to do any harm, and shouldn't have any more issues than if they were to keep a waterbed in one, as some occupants of those are STILL wont to do in this day and time. :p
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2015
  4. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    5,776
    Likes Received:
    4,967
    In terms of actuall PSI a chubby guy standing on size 11's has more weight per square inch then and 1100 pound safe does. The guy say he weighs 300lbs and has 1 sq ft of footprint (it would actually be less but for this example it would work just fine) so that is 2.03 lbs per sq ft. An 1100 lb Safe is going to be some where near 30 x 27" in foot print. that's only 1.35 lbs per sq inch.

    So as long as the floor has reasonable support it will be fine with a safe. We used to live in a 14' wide and had a Queen sized water bed That weighed a bit more then a gun safe LOL.
     
    DuneHopper, Dyjital, Stomper and 2 others like this.
  5. techieguy

    techieguy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,022
    Likes Received:
    167
    Well in my home (manufacture home) we have both a queen size water bed and 800lb safe and we have had zero problems! The floor is supported by 2x6 (on ~18" centers) running across 8 -10" metal beams...so the floor shouldn't be a problem.
     
  6. jluck

    jluck Really,Really, Close to Newport Oregon 97365 Voted #1 Member

    Messages:
    1,890
    Likes Received:
    1,210
    If it's long term, Why not put some support under it if he has the forethought to do so. I dis agree with most of the posts here. I was a mobile home installer and mover for a while. I broke trusses (more than one) just by walking on the roof. I split the main floor joist for 30+ feet by running a lag bolt through it (A essential practice for joining the two halfs).

    Pay a neighbor kid $50 to put some support under it, Why not?
     
    x2ndxall likes this.
  7. Joe Link

    Joe Link Portland, OR Well-Known Member Staff Member Lifetime Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    6,269
    Likes Received:
    4,544
    I'd rather be safe than sorry, so this makes sense. What would you do for support?
     
    Stomper and F2CMaDMaXX like this.
  8. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim West of Oly Springer Slayer 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    5,271
    Likes Received:
    8,967
    Support is usually cinder blocks with wood wedges for MH. I have seen the concrete supports used with PT 4x4's used for outdoor decking.
     
    Stomper likes this.
  9. F2CMaDMaXX

    F2CMaDMaXX West of Portland from England Bullet goes where now? Staff Member Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    1,710
    Likes Received:
    1,074
    Ha, "rather be safe than sorry" Ha, sorry :D

    I'm interested in this too, not a manufactured home, or even a mobile home (not the same thing) but older and i don't trust all this wood.

    I like the idea of those 'adjustable' blocks ZA mentioned.
     
  10. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    6,469
    Likes Received:
    7,687
    The above picture says it all.
    I would install the supports first, then move the safe into position.
     
    F2CMaDMaXX likes this.
  11. Joe Link

    Joe Link Portland, OR Well-Known Member Staff Member Lifetime Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    6,269
    Likes Received:
    4,544
    Thanks guys!
     
  12. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    12,912
    Likes Received:
    19,563

    LMAO, I rest my case.... :rolleyes:
     
    Caveman Jim likes this.
  13. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    12,912
    Likes Received:
    19,563

    Musta been built by Karsten.... LOL! :D
     
  14. evltwn

    evltwn Gold Hill Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    562
    Likes Received:
    338
    I have a 2000# Rogue double door safe in a modular home, with no extra support under it. Hasn't caved in yet!
     
    jgeist likes this.
  15. jluck

    jluck Really,Really, Close to Newport Oregon 97365 Voted #1 Member

    Messages:
    1,890
    Likes Received:
    1,210
    I would just do as a normal MH is set up. Concrete pad, cinder blocks, 2x8 and a couple wedges. If its going to a exterior wall and the home was set up properly and is still in good shape it could be okay as is IMO.

    This.

    I set up every brand and "quality" known to man (practically). Their is not one built better than another overall. Lots of big claims and opinions out there though. I have seen the inner construction and working of most all the brands around the PNW. One might have "2x4 or 2x6 construction", Yea... In places of chunks and pieces none of which lumber would pass grade for a real house.

    I know one that I broke a few trusses on was a Palm Harbor and I don't remember the others. The one brand stuck with me as that's what the wife and I were going to buy when I started working for the company. I changed my mind from a mobile after working there a while. YMMV.
     
    Caveman Jim likes this.
  16. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,095
    Likes Received:
    6,890
    When I was young - about 40 years ago - I worked in three different manufactured home factories.

    The quality then from one manufacturer to another was quite different, both in materials and methods.

    The best one I worked for was in Woodburn (not Fuqua although that is who made the home I live in - I forget their name) and they put out three homes a day (instead of 6 or seven at the other factories), they used 2x6 studs in the walls instead of 2x4s, and they rejected any lumber that wasn't straight which resulted in about a 30% rejection rate, whereas the other manufacturers only rejected lumber if they couldn't make it work or it was broken.

    I've seen walls lifted from the assembly rack that were limper than a wet noodle. I've had to use clamps and all kinds of straps and other kludges to get things to line up. I've had to glob patches over holes in ceiling tiles.

    I will say, that at the time, the floors were much stronger than the roofs, and much much stronger than the walls, in any brand or model of manufactured home that I ever worked on.

    As others have said, the general practice is to build a welded steel I-beam frame and then lay a floor on joists on top of that. So generally the floors are relatively strong.

    That said, I am sitting here right now looking at a full bookcase that seems to have caused my floor to not be level underneath it, so I am having doubts about putting a safe on the floor.
     
    jluck likes this.
  17. F2CMaDMaXX

    F2CMaDMaXX West of Portland from England Bullet goes where now? Staff Member Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    1,710
    Likes Received:
    1,074
    Anyone know where you can get those twist adjusters?
     
  18. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    6,469
    Likes Received:
    7,687
    A set of RV trailer levelers would probably work. The old school type that any RV supply store would carry.

    upload_2015-2-13_18-46-48.jpeg
     
    gunnails likes this.
  19. Nick Burkhardt

    Nick Burkhardt NE Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,659
    Likes Received:
    1,825
    Keep in mind that the concrete perimeter foundation around these homes is just "skirting" to keep the critters out. The metal I beams rest on stacked blocks or metal jackstands in the center of each section. Also, newer models that came from the factory "foundation ready" actually have their I beams tapper down near the outer edge of the home so they won't interfere with the concrete perimeter. Do NOT place your safe against and outside wall where the ends of the I beams are the thinnest and weakest.
     
  20. Gaucho Gringo

    Gaucho Gringo Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    392
    Likes Received:
    276
    When I was working in home remodeling and damage work, I could lift a 2 story house off it's foundation with them, mine had a 6 foot tube though. The appropriate size beam under the floor supported by jack posts on a good load bearing surface and your floor isn't going to go anywhere with your safe in place. Also a previous poster had a good piece of advise to reinforce the floor prior to installing your safe.