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Good article on Smart Gun Technology

Discussion in 'Legal & Political Archive' started by tiggers97, Aug 11, 2014.

  1. tiggers97

    tiggers97 United States Well-Known Member

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    I just finished reading this article about smart-gun technology. A good one to reference the next time you hear someone say "The NRA is against any smart gun safety technology!".

    “I then had the biggest development in smart-gun technology coming together at my facility in Utah — the Intelligun” says W. P. Gentry, president of Kodiak Arms. The Intelligun uses scanners on a pistol’s grips. If a person’s biometrics — essentially, the patterns of his fingerprints — have been added to the gun’s software, the pistol will activate within one second of being touched.

    “This interested Eric Holder,” Gentry says. “He wondered how we might be able to control who was or wasn’t authorized. I stopped him right there. I looked right across a table at Eric Holder — yeah, the attorney general of the United States — and told him, ‘If you try to mandate my smart-gun technology, I’ll burn it down.’ The Intelligun is designed to save lives, not restrict freedom.”

    http://www.nationalreview.com/article/385109/smart-gun-maker-who-told-holder-frank-miniter
     
  2. balaperdida

    balaperdida eastern idaho Well-Known Member

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    Just from my experiences with software quality assurance, I would have to ask this Gentry guy how much liability insurance he has to cover when software fails at the moment the legal gun owner is in a life-or-death situation. [edit] What if the legal gun owner is wearing gloves? I almost always use gloves in cold weather.
     
  3. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, gloves are an issue.

    Plus, in my experience - fingerprint readers, at least the inexpensive ones many buildings use to control access, can be fooled.

    Would I ever buy a "smart" gun that controlled who can access it?

    Most likely not - I control the access to my firearms and since I am a software engineer and have a EE degree, I know enough about both to not trust them in such a function where the benefit is very slight in my regard.

    Then, as pointed out, there are those in government who would VERY much like to be able to control firearms in other peoples hands - especially remotely. This is not the first time someone in government has brought this up, and not just about guns, but cars, phones and computers too.

    Notice the categories; self-defense, transportation, communication, information.

    Control those remotely and individually, and you control a population to a very great degree.
     
  4. tiggers97

    tiggers97 United States Well-Known Member

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