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Glock 23 Questions

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by M.Link, Mar 16, 2010.

  1. M.Link

    M.Link Guest

    I was looking for a great carry gun so I bought a Brand New G23. I love the gun! I bout it with night sights. My question is, should I leave this stock (option 1), go semi aftermarket (option 2) or go all out (option 3) or a combo (option 4), you tell me what combo. It is my carry gun and HD gun.

    Opt 1 - Stock

    Opt 2 - LWD Barrle, Stippled Grip, Metal Guode Rod

    Opt 3 - Same as above plus ALL the internals aftermarket. (Trigger parts, firing pin, etc.)

    Opt 4 - Your combo.

    I was also thinkng about a LaserMax.
     
  2. jdub75

    jdub75 PNW Well-Known Member

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    As a carry gun, you may want to ask around a bit on changing the trigger & other internals. Some folks seem to think this could come up in a civil suit if you must use it in self defense.
     
  3. matt_w

    matt_w Hillsboro, OR Active Member

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    Leave it stock. The most I would ever do to mine is get a 9mm conversion barrel. It's hard to mess with perfection!
     
  4. branchbuster

    branchbuster Albany Active Member

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    I have stock 3rd gen 23 and it shoots great and has a fine trigger. Stick to KISS for carry.
     
  5. usfatboy01

    usfatboy01 Hillsboro, Oregon Member

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    +1
     
  6. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    I believe you also void your warranty adding aftermarket parts to the gun. It shouldn't need it, as Glocks are very reliable, but its nicer to have it and not need it then need it and not have it. Plus there is the liability view in a self-defense shooting. Just imagine trying to answer the questions of why you thought you knew more about the gun than the engineers who designed it. Why did you change parts? Wouldn't Glock have put that part in it if you needed it? Why did you lighten the trigger pull?

    Lord knows you don't have any malicious intent by changing parts, but some overzealous prosecutor or ambulance chasing lawyer in a civil suit would certainly try to claim otherwise...
     
  7. BroncoFan

    BroncoFan Eastern Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I have carried a stock Glock 23 and 27. Love them both. Recently bought Storm Lake 9mm conversion barrels for both plus a LWD for the 23 to shoot reloads. More accurate than the stock barrels.
    Love the Glocks
     
  8. phathom

    phathom Vancouver, WA Member

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    Stock. Possibly a laser on it, rather it be lasermax, crimson trace, or whoever. Shoot it lots (at least a couple hundred rounds), run some drills with it, carry it. Get comfortable with it.

    I carry a 19 on me everyday, I was thinking about the 23 but got the 9mm instead. They are pretty much identical except for caliber, but the trigger on mine is nice and it is completely stock.

    Shoot it enough and get used to it before thinking about changing stuff out.
    They made a great gun from the factory, so much that even law enforcement and military don't change stuff out to use them in the field. That says something there.
     
  9. phathom

    phathom Vancouver, WA Member

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    Stock. Possibly a laser on it, rather it be lasermax, crimson trace, or whoever. Shoot it lots (at least a couple hundred rounds), run some drills with it, carry it. Get comfortable with it.

    I carry a 19 on me everyday, I was thinking about the 23 but got the 9mm instead. They are pretty much identical except for caliber, but the trigger on mine is nice and it is completely stock.

    Shoot it enough and get used to it before thinking about changing stuff out.
    They made a great gun from the factory, so much that even law enforcement and military don't change stuff out to use them in the field. That says something there.
     
  10. mjz52

    mjz52 Tri-Cities Member

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    Before you stipple the grip look into a Talon Gun Grip. I put 1 on my G23 and I love it.
     
  11. M.Link

    M.Link Guest

    Good to see you guys are thinking the same as me. My idea was to do a bunch of stuff to it. I was hoping stock was what you guys thought. I also love glocks, that's why I sold all my other handguns and got down to kust Glocks!
     
  12. M.Link

    M.Link Guest

    Also, I've put 250rds of Remington through this with no problems and 40rds of Buffalo Bore which is what is always in it. No problems! Ide like to take some defensive handgun classes with it too.
     
  13. OFADAN

    OFADAN Brownsville, OR Well-Known Member

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    Depends on why you bought it...if for defense and conceal carry....then stock is the ideal option and I'd suggest you invest the money you would have put into the "stuff" you don't need with training ammo, training and practice of newly developed skills. You now have excellent "hardware" so now augment it with additional software skills.

    Once you get somewhere between 5000 to 10,000 rounds thru your G23 the trigger will smooth out and be as good or better than any trigger job.
     
  14. Taurus 617 CCW

    Taurus 617 CCW Northern Idaho Member

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    I have a Glock 19 for carry (same size as yours but in 9mm) and the only things I altered on it were the installation of night sights, a metal guide rod, and a pearce grip plug to keep it clean. I would not recommend altering the trigger with it being a carry gun. Too many horror stories from people that had to deal with a vindictive D.A. and the court system over their self defense court case.
     
  15. longcolt

    longcolt Zephyrhills, FL Active Member

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    It is important to know if you intend to shoot reloads in your Glock. If you use lead bullets for practice a switch to the Lone Wolf barrel in SS is a good move. Cost is about $100 and its a drop in fit. You will get a slight increase in accuracy at longer ranges since its a match barrel.

    The 3.5 connector is easy to install and will make a big difference, in my opinion, in the operation of the trigger. Again, aiding overall accuracy.

    The weak link on Glocks is the plastic guide rod. So to replace it with a Stainless Steel one is a inexpensive upgrade that adds balance to the gun.

    If you intend to shoot the pistol a lot the modifications are worth the money and really not that expensive if you do them yourself.

    If the pistol is a carry only pistol then just stick with the stock gun and use defensive ammo. The Glock 23 is a fine choice for protection.
     
  16. NWPilgrim

    NWPilgrim Portland area Member

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    Leave it stock. Only change a part if you discover through much shooting and training that you need anything different. And I don't mean sport-specific mods but defense type of training and shooting.

    The original parts are all well designed and work together. I put a stainless guide rod in one of my G23s on a whim and i can;t tell any difference, and the other G23 with the OEM plastic rod holds up just fine. In a pinch the Glocks will continue to shoot even if the guide rod tip breaks off and it goes flying out the front.

    I've played around with other trigger springs and have since gone back to the factory 5.5#.

    This is one of the major attractions to the Glock pistols: they are good to go out of the box. I was just cleaning my carry G23 last night and thinking what a great design it is that I can depend on it shooting even if not clean or lubed (but I baby it nonetheless). Some guns will jam if not properly lubed or too dirty. Not one of my Glocks have ever jammed except on faulty ammo.

    I would put my money into ammo, mags, training, spare parts, holster(s), and range time.
     
  17. phathom

    phathom Vancouver, WA Member

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    +1 on the plug on the bottom. Not only does it keep it clean, but it helps with quick mag changes as it's rounded and there's nothing for the mag to get caught up on if you don't put in perfect. It actually helps guide it in if you're in a hurry and happen to hit it. Definitely better than having that hole in the back.
     
  18. Tilos

    Tilos Idaho Active Member

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    For a range gun:
    The Storm Lake 9mm barrel and 9mm mag will shoot lead reloads or factory ammo into thumb size groups out to 20 yards.

    For defense:
    The Glock 40 barrel, 40 mag.
    At the range this will shoot baseball/softball size groups out to 15 yards with factory ammo.

    Mark the mags with a silver marker (large) 9 and 40 so you don't mix them up!

    2 guns in one, what's not to like?

    Another barrel (357Sig) still another gun!

    Tilos
     
  19. sheepman

    sheepman Las Vegas NV Member

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    Leave it stock, some changes may be OK (the plug, steel guide rod and others) but none are necessary. When I was shooting the Glock GSSF matches the only Glocks that had problems (that I was aware of) were ones with aftermarket parts. An aftermarket barrel is a good idea if you are going to shoot lead or covert to 9mm. Spend the money on ammo and shoot the gun a lot. Good luck : Bill
     
  20. NWPilgrim

    NWPilgrim Portland area Member

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    Don't forget the AA .22LR conversion slide assembly. The G23/G32 allows you to have a .22LR, 9mm, .40, and .357 SIG all on the same frame. But when used for defense mine is factory stock.