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Getting started W/prep

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by sawtooth, Mar 16, 2011.

  1. sawtooth

    sawtooth washington st. New Member

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    I'm just getting started with food storage and have read that mylar bags and oxygen absorbers are used for storing dry goods, would vacuum bagger be another viable option for long term storage? Also will 5 gal buckets from HD or Lowes work for storage of dry goods that have been bagged? Thank's
     
  2. MA Duce

    MA Duce Central Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Also, I made a tickler file in my appointments app that reminds me when it is time to rotate canned/ semi perishable goods. Has saved me a few AW BUBBLEGUM moments.
     
  3. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

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    seriously, who is the mod in this forum? We need to get us some stickies at the top since this stuff seems to pop up once a week. Would probably make life a bit easier for those involved.
     
  4. dave

    dave Independence Member

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    Any 5 gallon bucket with a 2(HDPE=High density Polyethylene) or a 5(PP=Polypropylene) rating in the triangle will work. Both Lowes and Home Depot 5 gallon buckets are food grade 2.
    Since you cant always reseal your vac bags, I would package your dried food in smaller packages as opposed to 1 large bucket filling vac sealed bag full of rice or whatever.
     
  5. Westfalia

    Westfalia The North Member

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    Personally I would recommend that you go for a food storage that you rotate as the primary solution. Of course you could use this method that is often described and discussed among preppers and survivalists, but the if you have a large storage that you rotate oxygen absorbers and mylar bags won’t be necessary.

    The main problem as I see it is to get a pantry that’s big enough to accommodate a long-term food storage and get it organized so that all the supplies are easily accessed so that you can get an good overview. Store what you eat and eat what you store. You should be storing what you plan to eat the next weeks and months. At this point you are extremely well prepared; it would take a crisis of unprecedented proportions before you would actually need such a large food storage.

    If you build a food storage with a capacity over 6 months to 1 year than this could become an alternative for extending this storage using Mylar-bags and oxygen absorbers, or as an alternative look into the solutions with freeze dried canned food filled with nitrogen, such solutions are available from Mountain House and other companies.

    In short: Get your everyday storage in to order, find storage solution and see what you can rotate before taking this step. Expand it step by step. This should be a part of your everyday life, no matter how well you store food it will become a rotten investment with time if you can’t rotate it.

    Longer article about food storage and starvation: Sibi Totique: Food, Starvation and Famine – Crisis Preparedness and Survival

    The Free Online Survival Guide
     
  6. sawtooth

    sawtooth washington st. New Member

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    Thanks to all that replied,been studying prepping pretty hard the last couple of weeks,the bucket and mylar vs vacuum packing are the two things I hadden't been able to find info on, now I have the answers.The disaster in Japan got my wife and I off our duffs and start prepping, also sending supplies to my wifes relatives in Japan,hope We never have to experience what there going through. Thanks to all!
     
  7. FreakyStylie

    FreakyStylie Willamette Valley Member

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    I'm not really into this yet. My main focus is on a mobile survival, but this thread reminded me of how my grandparents used to stock their pantry.

    Everything in my grandparents' pantry was in 5 gallon containers. 2 containers per item. Sugar, salt, rice, noodles, etc. The top container was in use; the bottom container was storage. When the top container was emptied, it was filled and placed on the bottom. I have no idea what they used for containers, but I can tell you that I didn't have the strength to open them until I was around 12 years old. The sugar and salt had saltines mixed in to absorb moisture.
     
  8. EZLivin

    EZLivin SW of PDX Well-Known Member

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    A very inexpensive and practical thing to do. Anyone can do it. How many actually get around to it? Probably less than 1%. There is no logical reason to neglect doing it.
     
  9. FreakyStylie

    FreakyStylie Willamette Valley Member

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    I haven't started that yet though. I got close once. Then I got married. :laugh: It just takes a little extra cost in the beginning, and your refill costs are more, but far less often, plus you get stuff a lot cheaper by buying in bulk, so it's a win/win situation. I think I need to start taking over the shopping and get back on it. It drives me crazy when I hear people say they have to go to the store to get ____ because they are out. It's best to have to go get ____ because you opened your last one.
     
  10. Wenis

    Wenis Tri-Cities, WA Member

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    I've done the mylar/buckets, freeze-dried #10 cans, MREs, but the cheapest, most bang-for-your-buck long-term food storage is visiting your local LDS cannery. By the time you factor in the cost of mylar, 02 absorbers, buckets, lids and food, you'll save more money buying their #10 cans or canning your own at their cannery. Just trust me on this, but remember variety is the spice of life so don't put all your eggs in one basket (or rice & beans).
     
  11. FreakyStylie

    FreakyStylie Willamette Valley Member

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    We were just discussing the LDS stuff at work today. It got me thinking. I'll have to check it out.
     
  12. MrB+

    MrB+ Portland area Member

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    Or better, 'cause they're selling cases at half-price. Opportunity buying is terrific.

    MrB+
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