Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

getting back into reloading interested on your thoughts

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by xm193, Sep 19, 2013.

  1. xm193

    xm193 seatac Active Member

    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    85
    reloading primarily 308,223 ,30-06,9mm and 357 need advice on the systems that are out there now.im interested on doing everything from getting range brass too reloading very specfic loads on 308 winchester.have all components brass primers and bullets and cleaning setup. just need all the dies reloading system ect, which one would you go with and why?

    cost is always a factor
    please no one word answers
     
  2. Flopsweat

    Flopsweat Slightly right of center Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,978
    Likes Received:
    2,214
    Capitalization. ;)
     
  3. hookmiester

    hookmiester Eastern Polk Co Member

    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    5
    Good question. I am not getting back into it, just getting into it. I have looked at a several brands and the Dillons seem to be ok. I only say that because a Dillon 550b fell into my lap. I like the progressive part of it. .5 cents
     
  4. Benihaus

    Benihaus Portland American

    Messages:
    349
    Likes Received:
    111
    get a rock chucker and try to find a used Dillon SDB for the 9mm or just take the 9 off your list and buy bulk reloads
     
  5. xm193

    xm193 seatac Active Member

    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    85
    Thanks for the imput so far but i have found to get what i need its pretty complicated with the different sets and what you get actually need.
     
  6. Nwcid

    Nwcid Yakima and N of Spokane Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,593
    Likes Received:
    1,480
    I agree, get a Rockchucker or other single stage press to start out. Even when you have progressive press(es) you will still use the single stage often. Since you need one why not start with one? The price is right and you can get reloading right away. As you progress add the parts/presses you want.

    Here is one example all set up and ready to go with everything you need but dies and the shell holder, Graf & Sons - RCBS PRESS ROCK CHUCKER SUP. MASTER KIT w/o DIES
     
  7. ch139

    ch139 teh gehtoe Active Member

    Messages:
    891
    Likes Received:
    137
    Have been "reloading" pistol ammo for some years now; its just the stuff used in plunking at tin cans and an occasional speed steel or USPSA match... nothing extraordinary and have just been trying to crank it out so thereis plenty to shoot. My Dillon 550 has been awesome. If I could go back in time the only thing I think I'd like to change would be to have gotten a 650 rather than the 550.

    Have just (read barely scratching the surface) started getting into "handloading" for "accurate rifle." I'm still really at the start of the learning curve with this different kind of loading, but am learning a lot. One of the neatest things I think ive come across on youtube is a channel by LoneWolfUSMC; the guy is a current police officer and long range competitor and a former Marine Corps sniper. His youtube shows are high quality (not normally seen on YT), his info seems great and he really seems to know his stuff. There are a good 10 videos onhis page from a year ago on reloading that are fantastic! Aside from that I am thinking I might like to get a single-stage Hornandy Lock-n-Load press for the more precision stuff (I thinking of cooking 223 and 308). Seems like a lot of folks do all their work in one space... I for some reason try to keep my brass cleaning/prep to the garage as it is pretty dirty stuff and save the bench for the mote sterile environment of loading. Hope this helped. If you wind up checking out that youtube channel I'd love to know what you think; I like it and believed I have learner a lot (still have a long ways to go to be sure).

    ETA: I've been using an ole RCBS Junior press and universal decapping die to pop old primers before cleaning. Kinda seems like an extra step, but the press was a $20 gun-show pick-up and this helps to keep one of the "dirty jobs" away from the "clean area." Having g a clean case with lube on it going into a sizing die and then also popping the dirty primer out seems... wrong.
     
  8. ch139

    ch139 teh gehtoe Active Member

    Messages:
    891
    Likes Received:
    137
  9. evltwn

    evltwn Gold Hill Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    562
    Likes Received:
    338
    Wow...talk about an open ended question...I reload both for volume (9mm, 45 ACP, .223 and other handgun loads. I also load for a .22-250. I use a Dillon 550B for volume, and my single stage Lee for the .22-250. Precise rifle rounds require a lot of steps to complete, and volume is not a consideration when reaching out beyond 300 yards. I might add that when using military brass, removing the crimp BEFORE the round enters the progressive press is important. In fact,for .223 and .308 I deprime military brass with a Lee hand deprimer, size, swage and install primers on the single stage stage, then go to the Dillon, take off the priming tube, and actually load the round. Harder? Sure, but easier than replacing depiming pins, and you have to get that crimp out during the process anyway.n Hope this proves helpful.
     
  10. PX4WA

    PX4WA Tacoma, WA Active Member

    Messages:
    543
    Likes Received:
    158
    For rifle get the hornady single stage. You will appreciate the bushing system

    Our you can retrofit the bushing to another brand if you prefer
     
  11. Misterbill

    Misterbill Yakima County, Washington New Member

    Messages:
    1,308
    Likes Received:
    1,013
    Depends on how much rifle ammo you go through. A single-stage press like the less expensive RBS system works quite well unless you shoot your rifles a LOT. (Like over 50-rounds a week).

    For pistols, a progressive press like the Dillon 550 series is well worth the investment. A single range-day's pistol ammo can take many, MANY hours to reload using a single-stage press. A progressive press on the other hand, you're talking less than an hour.

    Starting out, I'd go with a single-stage as cheap as you can get one and try it out. If you find you don't like it, you're out maybe $100 for the whole setup. A Dillon or similar progressive press plus all the dies, especially for multiple calibers and it's many hundreds. -A potentially very expensive mistake if you don't like doing it, and many don't.
     
  12. cookie

    cookie THE SOCIALIST STATE OF KALI - FORNIA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,077
    Likes Received:
    533
    I have used the Dillon 550 for 9mm, 38special, 357, 40S@W, 45 acp ,308, 30/06, 300 Weatherby mag and 338 lapua . Since 1991. Started loading in 1976 when a friend brought over 2 boxes with everything RCBS needed to reload. He never used it . I loaded quite a bit of ammo on the RCBS Rock chukker press . But once I used the Dillon I never used the single stage again.
     
  13. Papercidal

    Papercidal Vancouver ,Wa Active Member

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    112
    A turret press is a great place to start out. It can be used as in essence a single stage that only requires rotating the tool head to set up for your next operation or with a auto indexer to make a decent amount of ammo. That and a lee classic turret is priced around the cost of a single stage.
     
  14. Flopsweat

    Flopsweat Slightly right of center Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,978
    Likes Received:
    2,214
    I have one of those and use it for a lot of different loads. Unless you only every do very small batches, you will eventually want something faster than a single stage. You can learn and do everything that you would with a single stage on a turret press, and still have a more efficient setup. It's not going to be suitable for cranking out thousands of rounds of plinking ammo, but it's fine for medium sized batches and very easy to switch from one caliber to another. This will let you get into reloading at a reasonable cost and see if you like it before you drop a thousand dollars on equipment. The Lee Classic, IIRC is taller than the newer turret, so it will handle longer cartridges than the new one. The best price I found most recently (including S&H) was at F&M Reloading, but that was a couple of years ago.
     
  15. Liberty97045

    Liberty97045 Oregon City Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    745
    Likes Received:
    592
    RCBS
     
  16. 71firebird400

    71firebird400 NW WA New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    6
    Get a single stage to start; something as cheap as the Lee kit will get you going.
     
  17. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Moses Lake, WA Active Member

    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    60
    The standard advice for beginners is to get a single stage. One, to find out if you really like the fussy-fussy aspect of reloading properly and safely. Two, to gain experience before going into high volume production. Both of those reasons are valid.

    A turret progressive will operate as a single stage, but will cost you more to get started. A single stage might lead you into a progressive or turret in the future, which adds to the total expense.

    I started on a single stage in 1948. I have a couple I need to find, hidden back in the dark recesses of my storage. I also have several Lyman Tong Tools. I'm now using a Dillon 500. Today, they lable it the BL 550. I reload for 32-20, 9mm, 45 ACP, 8mm Mauser, 30-06.

    Pops
     
  18. BAMCIS

    BAMCIS Eugene Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,191
    Likes Received:
    981
    Don't do it. You'll just wear your gun(s) out faster. :laugh: