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Well, not really, but for many years the trigger on my 'old' Bersa 644 .22 had a little 'glitch' that didn't seem normal so last night I dove into it to resolve the problem.

What I found was the hammer/trigger link was slightly bent by a couple thou and was not operating smoothly.

Anyway I took it out and lightly tapped it on a flat, smooth chunk of steel to flatten it, then 'stoned' it on an oilstone to get it completely flat and smooth.

Result? A much smoother, (and lighter) trigger pull. Sometimes all it takes are the 'simplest' things to resolve a problem!

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Good work! I was assembling an AR last night and realized I forgot to buy anti walk trigger pins so what was I to do? Polish/stone a mil spec trigger I had on hand and drop it in. I even had a spare JP spring kit on hand. The thing turned out pretty good, very smooth and crisp, not quite a Geissle but not too far either.
 
Polish/stone a mil spec trigger
Amazing what can be accomplished with a little patience and 'stoning' of parts on a good bench oilstone!

Unfortunately the Dremel Co. prevailed with those who do not have patience !

Unfair thing to say. The Dremel tool has it's place when used correctly and for the proper applications - unfortunately far too many use them to hurry things up with disastrous results...
 
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I like tinkering on guns. I recently fixed my 1911 feeding problems. The gun was running
fine for years then recently it would not feed 45 wadcutters. I polished the barrel throat, frame feed ramp
and bolt face with a Dremel and jewelers rouge. Problem fixed runs like a top.
My S&W Victory started not locking open on the last round. Disassembled the pistol and peened
the bolt hold open part and stoned the worn spot on the bolt. Problem fixed. Learn how to
work on your own guns. A lot of time all the gun needs is disassemble and clean/lubrication.
The 2 guns that I have the most experience with over the years are S&W revolvers and 1911 pistols.
I learned from the Jerry Kuhnhausen's shop manuals.
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Many years ago we bought the wife an Astra A-90 9mm. Now if your not familiar with this pistol its very similar to a SIG 22O but with a double stack Mag (19rds) and a steel frame, it has a firing pin disconnect that rotates the pin out of battery and is a Double Action Semi.

Anyway when it showed up we cleaned it up and took it out and ran a box of 50 through it. The double action trigger was very rough and the wife didn't like it all all. SO I took it on the bench and carefully polished all the internal parts to 1200p grit like I would have when I was a Custom Knifemaker (which I was at the time) before the mirror polishing step on a knife blade. That took all the rough out of the pistol I then carefully worked the sear to make the release slightly crisper. Working a tiny bit at a time.

It turned out to be a very very smooth pistol. Which while she doesn't carry it any more is still a joy to shoot. And after picking up a couple of the .40SW magazines for it it now holds 20rds when using those magazines. Heavy as all get out but a very easy pistol to control. To bad they only imported them for a few years and now parts etc are near impossible to find.
 
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