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Freedom Munitions brass trade-in

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by mcfoto, Oct 16, 2015.

  1. mcfoto

    mcfoto Newberg Active Member

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    Hi guys (and gals),

    I've been picking up my brass for almost 6 months now while toying with the idea of reloading. Well, that's looking less likely so thinking about using the trade-in program at Freedom Munitions. Anyone have experience with this? By math, it looks like I need to get at least 9 lbs. into a large flat rate box to break even on the shipping.

    Any alternatives? It's almost all 9mm so I know that I'd only get $20 per 1000 on the open market for unwashed cases.

    Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. rick benjamin

    rick benjamin USA, Or, Damascus Secure the drama Silver Supporter 2016 Volunteer

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    Thanks for picking up your brass!
    I started reloading with a Lee kit and a mallet
     
  3. Steve M

    Steve M Beaverton, OR Well-Known Member

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    If 6 months of brass pickup is enough to have you selling your brass then you shoot enough to make reloading pay for itself. There is almost no excuse you can make that we can't help you overcome.

    If you're not in a big rush to start reloading then you can sit back and capitalize on the sales that show up starting around Thanksgiving and go into the first of the year.

    Get your bullets from Xtreme for about $40 for 500
    Primers from a local gun store for about $30 per 1000
    Powder from a local gun store for about $27 per lb

    That pound of powder should last for more than 1000 reloads and Xtreme runs free shipping deals from time to time so you can easily get 1000 rounds of 9mm loaded for about $137. Of course that ignores tooling cost, but for $28 plus a hammer you could give the Lee Classic Loader a try and upgrade from there as you see fit. Of course you should also enjoy reloading or it would quickly become a chore.
     
    Benchrest, Dyjital and Oathkeeper1775 like this.
  4. mcfoto

    mcfoto Newberg Active Member

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    Thanks for your response and encouragement. Yes, I've been averaging shooting 200 rounds a week. I've recently started shooting USPSA so I anticipate that number will increase. So yes, from a long term standpoint, reloading would be more economical. Since I've been cursed with an MBA, let me lay it out a different way. By my figuring, raw materials (primer powder and bullets) would be 30-40% of the cost of factory ammo if I continue to save my own brass. I understand that cases have a finite number of times they can reload so eventually I'll need cases. I'm estimating that equipment (tumbler, press, dies) will run another $1000 with a ten to twenty year lifespan. So on the short side, amortization is $100 a year. Space in my garage for a bench in my garage? Let's say $50 a month. So $700 a year in hard costs. Still looking pretty good. Now we have time. Ugh. How much is my time worth? My employer and I have settled on around $40 an hour. Best estimate is to begin, it will take me an hour to reload 100 rounds. Those I've spoken to who are experts get about 400 rounds an hour if their bench is walk-up ready. I think we've blown the economic advantage.

    Here's the reasoning: since I'm a late comer to shooting and I know I enjoy shooting, I'd rather take the $700 and buy a new gun every year. Being that I'm of advanced age (I shoot senior in competition) I'm not confident I have the time to take the risk if it's not enjoyable. I went to a friends house who has reloaded for 20+ years, and several times he was confronted with issues that would have had me throwing things. I'm just not that patient.

    Sorry for the long winded response.
     
  5. Steve M

    Steve M Beaverton, OR Well-Known Member

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    I can reload 100 rounds of 9mm per hour on a single stage press without rushing too much. It's all about economy of motion and figuring out how to reduce each step to as few movements as possible. However, were I burning through 200 per week I'd have a Dillon on my bench before too many months had passed.

    When people start claiming their spare time is worth money I stop arguing because to me such notions are nonsensical unless you get paid that rate 24 hours per day 365 days per year and have to stop getting paid to indulge in a hobby. Now if you have to take time away from family to reload then that is a real concern. If you're worried about missing a re-run of Bonanza then you're already lost.
     
    Oathkeeper1775 likes this.
  6. Oathkeeper1775

    Oathkeeper1775 Coast Range Well-Known Member

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    The quality of your handloads will be worth far-more than budget commercial ammo......


    Sit back and enjoy the hobby; particularly stocking-up all year, then finishing-up during the rainy seasons.
     
  7. mcfoto

    mcfoto Newberg Active Member

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    True that. Lets take my other hobby; I play bass in a bar band. Do I make $40 an hour? Nope. I'm lucky to make $40 for the whole evening. If my grown children come, I pick up their bar tab and am often in the hole. Add time for band practice and the cost of my gear, way not profitable.Why do I do it? I LOVE it. I just don't see me loving reloading. I'm not patient and meticulous. I hire plumbers and electricians not because I can't figure it out. The many trips to Home Depot and rework when it still leaks drive me crazy.
     
  8. elsie

    elsie Way over there on the left Well-Known Member

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    I find reloading relaxing. Kind of like some people and knitting. So for me, it's not reloading. It's knitting cartridges.


    elsie
     
    Caveman Jim likes this.
  9. PiratePast40

    PiratePast40 Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

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    I happen to find reloading a fun part of the shooting hobby. Doubt that I'm actually saving money, just able to shoot more for the same amount of money. It takes some mechanical ability, application of some basic math, and the mindset of enjoying that kind of activity.

    There's nothing wrong with not wanting to reload. FM sells decent ammunition at a fair price. You have a really good selection of weights and shapes in their inventory so it does give you some room to experiment with what your gun likes.

    As far as sending brass back to FM, why not offer it to fellow shooters first? The going rate is $20/k for tumbled brass picked up at matches. But keep in mind, brass picked up at matches is typically shared among the squad, especially if it's marked. I've seen some people picking up brass instead of taping and resetting, and then keeping the brass to themselves. I consider that a major act of rudeness, and so do most of the other shooters.
     
  10. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

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    250:hr on a turret press

    My 9mm reloads are at $12 per 100 (50% of new or less)

    We reload for fun, not for monies. It's our hobby.

    If your hobby is to shoot and the cost doesn't matter, then shoot! Don't reload.

    When you settle and realize you want to have control over your ammunition; then you reload. Until then enjoy your trigger finger. People will almost always pickup brass from you and help fund your endeavors. 9mm is what?... $.03 on the open market? $30/1000 to some shmuck who just paid for 150 rounds of shooting for you just range scavenging..


    Go shoot and have fun.
     
    Mikej likes this.
  11. Steve M

    Steve M Beaverton, OR Well-Known Member

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    Perfectly understandable. If you don't enjoy it enough to make it a hobby and you can't justify it on the cost savings then the motivation to reload is nill.

    I had been dreaming of reloading for a couple decades before I finally started. What motivated me to start was not being able to find ammo and feeling utterly helpless and defenseless. So in addition to enjoying the process of reloading I've also got enough components now to get me through anything but Hillary getting elected.
     
    Trick likes this.
  12. Mikej

    Mikej Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    Excuse me, but, you have to pay for your kids to come listen to you? Bummer man!

    I started loading four years ago on an RCBS single stage. It's a sorta "Zen" thing for me now. i actually have been loading more than I shoot for the last year or so. Lack of cartilage in a wrist will do that to you.

    You do what is best for you, but if you're going to keep shooting, and are approaching "senior-hood", you may want to get set up at this point so you can load when you have more time down the road? Brass and bullets won't go bad, and powder and primers will last years with proper storage. If you never get into it price for equipment and supplies certainly won't get cheaper either so you could possibly look at it as an investment of sorts.
     
  13. Benchrest

    Benchrest The Desert Planet Well-Known Member

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    Please don't let anyone convince you that reloading is about saving money :D

    What I have, um, 'invested', in equipment and supplies represents a bubblegum ton of factory ammo.

    I reload because I enjoy it :)

    Now where did I put the kid's braces money... :D
     
  14. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

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    We may reload cheaper but that just means we shoot more!

    I'd rather not calculate the costs of the powder sitting on the shelf either. Once that number is known I'll be upset I don't have another rifle or three.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2015
    Benchrest likes this.
  15. Benchrest

    Benchrest The Desert Planet Well-Known Member

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    Only 3?

    :D
     
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  16. NWGlockgal

    NWGlockgal Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I don't reload yet either and recently sent brass back to Freedom. Because it was too heavy for me to carry, instead of using one large priority box I used two medium ones. I spent about $190 on the ammo with free shipping. I received a $99 refund for brass I sent back. Minus the $25 it cost me to ship it (It would have been less to use a large box) I received a credit of $74. Take that away from the $190 I paid for the new ammo, it cost me $116 for 1000 rounds. Definitely worth picking up brass!