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Flat Base Bullets for .308

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by KTM530XCW, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. KTM530XCW

    KTM530XCW Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    Every few months there's a "Sharp Shooter Shootout" match at Clark Rifle. It's a 100 yard competition, I've shot it twice now with with my Savage .308 using 168g SMK's. I'm sub-MOA with the 168g SMK, but I've heard that a lighter flat based bullet is theoretically superior for 100 yard shots.

    So... Can anyone recommend a good match grade flat based .308 bullet? The Berger Match Target FB look intriguing. I'm contemplating trying the 135g or 150g, but for ~$50 per 100 I want to make sure i know what I'm doing before buying some. Any advice and direction is appreciated.
     
  2. SAR1846

    SAR1846 Oregon Member

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    I used to shoot service rifle at 200yds. Generally speaking, since the 10 ring & x ring are pretty large, most folks shoot 150gr psp/fmj/surplus vs. spending the extra cash on 168gr match HP. With the $$$ they've saved, they spend it on components to make more ammo to practice with (offhand, sitting, etc).... the point being, rather than spend the extra cash on components to give them a slight edge, they are spending it on practice to develop their form & reinforce the good habits (npoa/breath/trigger squeeze).

    How accurate do you have to be in this competition? is it a benchrest competition? I've heard of a lot of folks trying 125gr bullets for short range ammo... no specific recommendations.

    The flip side of this... if you've found a good load, its relatively inexpensive, and you know exactly where it hits... why change?
     
  3. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    In theory the flat based is good for short ranges mostly because the BT's take longer to stabilize. Whether this is true or not I haven't tested for my rifle. I get great performance out of std BT's at 100 yards and excellent performance at 200 yards.

    You're last sentence pretty much sums it up. If what you are using is doing the job, searching for something marginally cheaper may well eat up any savings in the workup of the load and subsequent practice in learning what it does.
     
  4. rrojohnso

    rrojohnso Vancouver, WA Member

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    I am no expert on the subject, but I have heard hot loads also take more distance to stabilize... makes sense to me if both were true.
     
  5. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    I too have heard this. What I'm beginning to believe is the entire art of shooting involves as much "Witchcraft" as "Science". Luck sometimes helps too.
     
  6. KTM530XCW

    KTM530XCW Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    I very much agree with the whole witchcraft comment. I'm finding that time behind the trigger is more beneficial than excess time spent loading.
     
  7. rrojohnso

    rrojohnso Vancouver, WA Member

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    ... That's the key. It's all about trigger time - and none of us get enough! :)
     
  8. Phil McGrath

    Phil McGrath Salem, Or New Member

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    Maybe I can help here with some info, flat base bullets(pills) fired on the short line can be very accurate thats why the bench rest shooters use them, there flat base also helps slow down barrel errosion.

    I'm a Service Rifle shooter and use this load in a M1a on the short line(200yds) offhand and sitting rapids when I do my part they will more than hold the 10ring, for 100yds they should work very well.

    You didn't say what brass you reload, I use military brass for there thicker construction I will assume that you use commercial brass Federal or Winchester so you will need too add about 1 grn of powder too the charges.

    Resize and trim brass too 2.005in
    Prime with any std large rifle primer you like
    Powder 41.5 IMR or H-4895 or 41.0 Varget
    Bullet Speer 125 TnT
    COAL- 2.70
    Keep the M/V under 3000fps so the bullet holds together, the old Speer box had a M/V warnning and I don't know how fast you can push the new 125's at. I don't know what your barrel lenth is but out of a 22in M1a my rifle runs about 2800fps. Recoil is about the same as a Ar/15.

    If there is alot of wind the 135 Sierra HPBT(COAL 2.75) with the same load data is a aussum performer and they don't have any speed limit to worry about just load and go.
     
  9. chowser2

    chowser2 seaside Member

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    the savage unless you changed the barrel is a 1:10 twist which is pretty much optimized for a bullet that weights around 168grs(theoredically). some people have had good success with 155 secnars.
     
  10. Phil McGrath

    Phil McGrath Salem, Or New Member

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    A 1/10 twist is very flexable for bullet weights in a range from 125grs to 210grs, the 125 Tnt has the same nose profile as the Sierra 168 thats why they work so good, another reason for the 125 is cost there cheaper to shoot, why shoot expensive bullets at 100yds when a cheap bullet thats just as accurate on the short line gets the job done?