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Fixing My Cracked Sako Stock

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by Huntbear, Jun 24, 2009.

  1. Huntbear

    Huntbear Ellensburg, Wa. Member

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    I have a Sako M995 in .338 WM. The stock cracked right at the wrist section. It was not a deep crack, and since Sako was not much help (denying any problem with the stock, though this model does this frequently, I found) I decided to just fix it and be done.


    So I spent about 2 hours with a utility knife, a drill and some acra-glass, and fixed my cracked stock. I opened up the crack line, and under cut the edges, for holding power, as well as drilling small "pillar holes" at angles from the crack. I then created a cross cut, approx. the same width and depth, and laid a piece of SS rod into it. I then took my hand drill and a bit slightly larger than my rod, and drillled two angled holes, from in front of the crack back into the wrist area, I will push a piece of rod into each one. I then sanded the finish off the stock in the area I wanted the acra-glass to adhere. I mixed my acra-glass, filled my drilled holes with it, then pushed my SS pins into the holes till they were below flush. I then finished the fix with the acra-glass, continually keeping the stuff where I wanted it, till it started to set up. Done some sanding on it, and am going to do a custom (read home done) camo paint job on it, to cover the patch. Here is the pictorial.

    The crack is a bit hard to see, but goes across the wrist.
    S4200117.jpg

    Prep work all done.
    crackedstock.jpg

    crackedstock1.jpg

    crackedstock2.jpg

    Acra-glass is setting up nicely and will be sanded down after curing for 24 hours.
    crackedstock3.jpg

    crackedstock4.jpg
     
  2. gallogiro

    gallogiro Willamette Valley Active Member

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    Pretty creative I think. Keep posting pictures of the progress. Nice to see it from start to finish.
     
  3. pdxjohann

    pdxjohann Portland near Tigard Member

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    Huntbear, I too would like to see the continuing repair in photos. By the way please describe more what is Acraglass? And, how will the Playdoe be used?
     
  4. Huntbear

    Huntbear Ellensburg, Wa. Member

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    Acra - Glass is a 2 part epoxy that is used for bedding rifles and making repairs in stocks. When using it, anything you do not want to become PERMANENTLY joined together, has to have a release agent on it. It also comes in a gel form, so it does not run.

    The playdough took the place of modelers clay for making a dam to keep the acra glass out of the trigger guard and receiver areas. When bedding an action, I actually use it to fill the bolt area of the receiver, and any other areas I want to keep the bedding compound out of at the time.
     
  5. gunwizard

    gunwizard Oregon New Member

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    Acra glass is wonderful stuff, I use it to repair not only gun stocks, such as an old double barrel Parker, and Sako, but a lot of other stuff also. It is permanent just like Huntbear stated.
     
  6. Huntbear

    Huntbear Ellensburg, Wa. Member

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    Well, finally got back to this project. I sanded the stock with 320 wet/dry paper to rough it up some, then taped off the barrel channel and action area. Since the "bottom metal" is part of the stock, I decided to paint it too.

    Ready to paint
    S4200198.jpg

    First coat was a light sand/tan color.
    S4200200.jpg
    S4200201.jpg

    Then using gray, and a couple of fern leaves...
    S4200202.jpg
    S4200203.jpg
    S4200204.jpg


    Then using the same fern leaves, and black.
    S4200206.jpg
    S4200207.jpg
    S4200208.jpg

    Then a clear coat over everything. My brother spraying so I could take a picture.
    S4200209.jpg
     
  7. Huntbear

    Huntbear Ellensburg, Wa. Member

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    Sorry, had to many pics, had to do a second post.

    After it was dry,
    S4200210.jpg
    S4200211.jpg
    S4200212.jpg


    And the completed job, and gun all reassembled.
    S4200228-1.jpg
    S4200229.jpg
    S4200230.jpg

    Total cost is about 35.00 for repair and paint. And I have a camo pattern that actually fits here on the wetside of the Cascade Mtns.
     
  8. SJS46

    SJS46 yamhill county Active Member

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    That gun looks great nice job.
     
  9. MacBookProAR

    MacBookProAR Stayton Member

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    that looks really good for a self repair and paint job.
     
  10. Huntbear

    Huntbear Ellensburg, Wa. Member

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    Well I am not quite an amateur. I have a gunsmithing degree from Colorado School of Trades. Just not using it right now.

    There are some issues with the repair, that I obviously did not see before the paint went on, so I may sand it down and fix them, or wait until the paint scratches up from being in the brush, rubbing against a pack and gunbelt, etc... then do the fixes.
     
  11. Huntbear

    Huntbear Ellensburg, Wa. Member

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    Oh, and thanks for the kind comments guys. They are appreciated.