1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!
  2. We're giving away over $850 in prizes this month -- enter now for your chance to win!
    Dismiss Notice

Fixed my tube fed .22 magazine with a .22 shell

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by Joe13, May 29, 2014.

  1. Joe13

    Joe13 NW of Vancouver Opinionated & Blunt Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

    Likes Received:
    Before I forget, the .22 casing had been fired before I used it for the repair.



    So I had my marlin 70ss break on me recently (my fault not hers). In my rush to put it together after having to troubleshoot some issues, I accidentally broke the plunger at the end of the tube magazine. Snapped it clean right where it goes from .22 diameter down to the .17 or so that travels up to the spring (my fist issue with the gun in the 20 years I've owned it).

    I tried super gluing it back together but that only lasted a handful of tubes worth of shots.

    Figuring I was stuck with having to buy a used one on eBay to match the color I decided to try half filling a .22lr case with epoxy and took the plunger and rammed it into the case.

    After a few hours to cure, I cycled some dummy ammo thru it and it seems to work flawlessly.:D

    I'll be out at the clean n shoot on larch Sat, so I'll see how well it holds up to live fire.

    I'll let you know...
    Last edited: May 29, 2014
    NWGlockgal likes this.
  2. Ttuck

    Ttuck Hillsboro Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Likes Received:
    If it looks stupid but works, It aint stupid.

    I had sprung a leak in a pair of neoprene fishing waders and tried gluing it shut, It didn't even hold up half way through a fishing trip. Some where along the road i got access to some epoxy and ended up epoxing a penny onto the hole, What do ya know. it worked.
  3. Swedish K

    Swedish K SW Washington Moderator Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    Looks like it should work - I fixed an old junker pistol for a co-worker that had the firing pin break off - if it didn't have family history for him I'm not sure I would have even tried. The firing pin was a cast piece with a hollow tube for the firing pin spring to ride in in the same part - I ended up drilling through where the pin broke off and tapping it - ran a screw that was contoured to the same size /shape of the missing pin part through the back side. If the part had been machined from steel instead of cast pot metal I would have welded it but then again it probably wouldn't have broken.