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Fish Ladder!

Discussion in 'Northwest Fishing' started by Rant, Apr 9, 2016.

  1. Rant

    Rant grand forks bc Member

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    So When are they going to make a fish ladder up the Grand Coulee Dam> I see there has been some talk about this!
     
  2. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

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    Ppphhpptttt.... if the greenies get their way, they'll have the damned dam torn completley out. :rolleyes:
     
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  3. Mikej

    Mikej Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    Nah, won't happen. I don't imagine the people that fish the lake would appreciate the DFW THEN having to eliminate, walleye, small mouth, large mouth, perch, rainbow.....
     
  4. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim West of Oly Springer Slayer 2016 Volunteer

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    Ain't gonna happen captain, the only way that any government agency manage resources is into extinction.
    Don't give them any ideas on how to keep with their longstanding inability to do anything right......
     
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  5. Rant

    Rant grand forks bc Member

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    RIVERS -- An expedition of canoeists and Native American students is leading an upstream effort to advocate construction of a fish ladder to reintroduce chinook salmon runs in the Columbia River above Grand Coulee Dam.

    canoe_ship.png

    On Aug. 2, five salmon-inspired dugout canoes started their journey up the Columbia River to pay tribute to the salmon no longer able to reach their historic spawning grounds of the Upper Columbia River since the construction of Grand Coulee Dam.

    The boats have made it past Chief Joseph Dam last week, paddled up Lake Rufus Woods and completed the portage around Grand Coulee Dam on Saturday. They expected to paddle up Lake Roosevelt to Keller Ferry by Saturday night and then leave there today, headed for Two Rivers at the mouth of the Spokane River by Monday night.

    From the confluence of the Spokane and Columbia Rivers, the paddlers will head up the Spokane River to Little Falls -- the first dam that blocked salmon from migrating up to Spokane Falls in 1910. Spokane Tribe schoolkids (who helped build one of the dugout canoes) will join the paddle. A public event of some sort is planned at the end of the week. See blog updates here.

    The “Sea to the Source” expedition left Astoria, Ore., in an upstream voyage toward Canal Flats, the source of the Columbia River in British Columbia.

    The crew consists of five river guides who oversee a river-based environmental education program called Voyages of Rediscovery. They are enlisting the muscle power of Indian Tribes, youths and other supporters along the way.

    “The idea behind the canoes and the river expedition is to bring the salmon back to the upper reaches of the Columbia River,” said Adam Wicks-Arshack a guide with Voyages of Rediscovery and environmental educator. “We carved these canoes with thousands of students who’ve had the salmon removed from their culture by Grand Coulee Dam.”

    canoe_columbiarivermap-640x640.jpg

    The five dugout canoes were carved at various schools over the past year. For most of the trip they have been paddling two canoes, the “Salmon Savior” a 21-foot ponderosa pine, carved at the Wellpinit Middle and High School on the Spokane Reservation and a larger 33-foot cedar canoe, the “Crying Salmon,” which was carved by the students of Inchelium School on the Colville Reservation.


    As the expedition arrives at each school that carved a canoe, Inchelium, Wellpinit, Kettle Falls, and Medicine Wheel Academy of the Community School in Spokane, the canoes will be gifted back to the school and young people who carved them.

    “These canoes represent the Salmon,” said Xander Demetrios, a river guide with the expedition. “They have traveled through many hardships from the Pacific Ocean and are nearing their former Spawning Grounds. These will be the first salmon to pass Chief Joe and Grand Coulee in a long time.”

    The expedition has canoed more than 545 miles up the Columbia River to Chief Joseph Dam, the first dam without a fish ladder and is approaching Grand Coulee Dam.

    The river guides and environmental educators anticipate another 1-2 weeks of paddling to reach the international border between the United States and Canada.

    John Zinser, boat builder and river guide, proudly praises the young carvers (see video above). “The students worked every day on these canoes and it is an honor to paddle these salmon canoes which were created with so much energy from so many young people,” he said.

    canoe_kids.jpg

    When the expedition arrives at each school the crew is giving presentations about their journey and the importance of salmon and the Columbia River. Most importantly each student will have the opportunity to paddle in the canoes they carved.

    This expedition comes in the midst of preparations by the United States and Canada to renegotiate the Columbia River Treaty that governs one of the great rivers of the world. The 1964 Treaty failed to consult with Tribes, First Nations, and the residents of southern British Columbia. The Treaty built 3 treaty dams in British Columbia and the Libby Dam in northwestern Montana, forcing 2000 people from their homes. The Treaty contains only the two purposes of hydropower and flood control.

    Tribes and conservationists want a third purpose added to the Treaty: restoring the Columbia River to ecological health including bringing salmon home to waters blocked by dams.

    “The Grand Coulee Dam was once considered to be the greatest engineering project the world had ever seen,” noted Wicks-Arshack. “Now let's get started with the greatest eco-engineering project—a fish ladder at the Grand Coulee Dam.”

    canoe_grand_coulee.png

    Voyages of Rediscovery is a program of The River School, a non-profit river based environmental education not for profit. They have been offering educational canoe trips and canoe building opportunities on the Columbia River for the past five years. If you would like to follow the Sea2Source expedition, you can follow their blog and/or facebook page.

    Posted Sept. 8, 2013, 6 a.m. in: canoeing, dams, Grand Coulee Dam, indian tribes, outdoors, salmon, salmon runs, sea to source, Spokane Tribe, voyages of rediscovery

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    By Rich Landers
    (509) 459-5508
    Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.
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  6. Rant

    Rant grand forks bc Member

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    I'm SURE WE HAVE THE TECHNOLOGY BUT NOT THE WILL TO BRING BACK THE SALMON TO UPPER COLUMBIA.
     
  7. Rant

    Rant grand forks bc Member

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    America gave 11.9 billion back to Iran and they cant afford to make a ladder up the Dam {That's chump Change} a relatively small or insignificant amount of money
     
    Caveman Jim likes this.
  8. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    All the fish ladders in the world won't help salmon swim past all those Native Indian nets strung tight across the Columbia River right above Bonneville dam.
     
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  9. albin25

    albin25 Lewiston Idaho Well-Known Member

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    I'm trying to think of another threatened or endangered species that is available at my local grocery store....So, I'll start giving a crap about Salmon numbers when I can no longer buy it in cans.

    :rolleyes:..Since they ended the selling of canned Siberian Tiger Chili, Bald Eagle Nuggets, and Condor Noodle Soup, those populations have increased..:rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2016
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  10. Rant

    Rant grand forks bc Member

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    When you can get the salmon over the Dam> you enhance everything for a thousand miles up stream > from Humans to bears to birds to otters ! its a win win for everyone!
     
  11. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Except for the Sea Lions.
     
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  12. Rant

    Rant grand forks bc Member

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    I take it they will be on the upper!
     
  13. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

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    Did they get their "Invasive Species" permits for those canoes, and did they clean them properly before entering each different body of water? o_O



    :D
     
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  14. Mikej

    Mikej Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    Good to have you back Stomper!

    So I got a question!!!! Who in the hell pays for all this canoeing up the Columbia?

    What a gig to get into huh? Go on this fabulous vacation, for months. Leave all your worries behind. See the river from water level and convince all that will listen about the plight of the salmon. All the while someone else pays your bills! Or, are these the wealthy, don't need to work a job crowd?

    Great gig if you can get I suppose.

    I think fish ladders should be on all dams though, and we should build even MORE dams, with fish ladders where applicable. I get really tired of constantly hearing how we have "Water Shortages" every summer when what we really have are water STORAGE shortages!
     
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  15. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Dams warm up the stored water and to help the Salmon smolts survive, the fish hatcheries truck the smolts down river and release them below Bonneville Dam.
     
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  16. Mikej

    Mikej Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    I haven't seen them do that for years. OR, their doing the drop somewhere else. We used to watch them load the tanker from Bonneville on a barge, just above Chinook Landing, and run to the middle of the river and feed the sea gulls. Well, they tried to fend them of with a fire hose spray. I thought now they just open up the dams a flush them down with massive release for three months? And personally, I believe that action backs up the Willamette and keeps IT"S springer smolts from getting down stream. I've brought that though up on ifish, Bill Monroe, and any other that would listen, but I just get poo-pooed.
     
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  17. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim West of Oly Springer Slayer 2016 Volunteer

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    That ifish crowd can be condescending bunch when they want to be and never get called to the mat but mention anything about certain GOV agencies and you get a PM sayıng "watch what you say or you will get banned"....
     
  18. mkwerx

    mkwerx Forest Grove, OR Well-Known Member

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    iFish is full of ODFW apologists and anti-hatchery wankers alike. If sportsmen can't come together and form a consensus, it's no wonder the agency in charge of managing the resources can't do a damn thing - we can't seriously pressure them into doing anything because we're too fractured.

    The ship has sailed as far as restoring long dead runs. Even IF they put a fish ladder in on every dam in the Columbia basin - the runs are dead. To restart them would be using other strains of fish. Can't do that - the stupid Native Fish Society would sue the living fecal matter out of anyone involved - because hatchery fish or fish from different parts of the drainage would be considered pollution in their eyes. They are still pushing junk science that any 8th grader could see through - being that hatchery and wild fish are genetically different and that hatchery fish are inferior - even those hatchery fish that make it through the same gauntlet of predators and pollution that wild fish do. If the fish makes it back to the river I'd say it's not "inferior".

    And don't get me started on the gill nets from commercials and natives.
     
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  19. Rant

    Rant grand forks bc Member

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    Well the salmon where just reintroduced {dead runs} into the okanogan river and its doing GREAT> heavy runs right up to Penticton BC!
     
  20. Rant

    Rant grand forks bc Member

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    Why not over Coulee NOW!