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First Hunting / Long Range Rifle?

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by Sirmohawk, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. Sirmohawk

    Sirmohawk Portland Active Member

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    Hi guys. I am looking in to buying my first bolt action hunting rifle and am not sure which caliber to get.

    First, things I would use it for, hunting and most of time, practice for long range shots like 5-600 yrds.
    Animals I could see myself hunting, Deer maybe an elk someday. Mostly I just want to learn to distance shooting.

    I thought I wanted a Remington 700 or a Howa in .308 but now I am considering a 30.06, 300 WSM or 300 Win Mag as well.

    I am a little concerned with recoil taking the desire out of shooting the rife, I have shot 30.06 in a savage with synthetic (didn't like it much but wasn't bad), I have shot a 300WSM which wasn't bad had more of a push then painful crack on the shoulder but I have never shot .308 or 300 Win Mag.

    The 300 Win Mag I'm looking at is the Rem 700 Stainless in synthetic but I am concerned it will take my arm off, lol.

    Looking here for opinions on well rounded caliber that would a be a good started for my intended use! :thumbup:

    All opinions and thought appreciated!
     
  2. DieselScout

    DieselScout S Clackamas County Well-Known Member

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    I would recommend a .308. It's a great place to start, will be great for deer hunting and the distance shooting you'd like to do. Before the recent bit of panic buying, .308 was cheap to buy and cheap to shoot and should come back around soon. It's a great place to start.
     
  3. Sirmohawk

    Sirmohawk Portland Active Member

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    Thanks Diesel :thumbup:
     
  4. DieselScout

    DieselScout S Clackamas County Well-Known Member

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    You're welcome, something else that just occurred to me.

    The other thing to consider is it's easy to learn with a .308. Many of the tactical scopes have reticules and knobs preset for the 7.62 (.308) bullet at a certain speed. They are easier to learn with as things are already done. The manuals are written for that caliber, how to adjust for windage, measure targets, how to hold off, or adjust using the dials. It will help you learn, so when you want to move onto something different or better, you'll have the knowledge already and be able to apply it quicker and more easily.
     
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  5. salmonriverjohn

    salmonriverjohn N.W Oregon coast, Gods country Well-Known Member

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    If recoil is a factor, take a look at the .25-06. This often over looked cartridge will do many tasks, from Elk to coyotes and the trajectory of the many choices in bullet weights will astonish most. It sends an 87 grain bullet out there around 3500 FPS and has the poop to fly a 120 grain at 3000+

    As DieselScout has pointed out, the .308 is a fine choice. If your looking for that one rifle for all game it would be hard to beat it, or the venerable .30-06.

    I picked up the .25 after shoulder surgery and can tell you, she'll do just about anything you ask her to and with a whole lot flatter trajectory and less recoil. If your looking for that "long range" shooter, it's hard to beat it without stepping up to the magnums.

    But wait, I forgot the 6mm Rem., and the .270! and the list could go on and on;).
     
  6. Skang

    Skang WA Well-Known Member

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    you shouldn't worry about the recoil. because it's a hunting rifle, not a weekend fun gun.

    I have shot 300 win-mag before, it's not that bad and I am fairly skinny guy.

    rem700 is very good choice.
     
  7. the4thshake

    the4thshake Portland Active Member

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    Shooting 600 yards and beyond requires precision ammo. Most hunting ammo just wont cut it. If you dont' handload your own ammo it seriously limits your options. A 308 is probably the easiest to find match grade factory ammo.

    Making hits at that kind of distance requires more from a scope than just a ballistic reticle. More likely than not you will have to dial up your elevation and correct your windage. A high quality scope with repeatable adjustments is a must. You need clear glass to see at that distance and turrets that put the bullet where you tell it to go. Don't cheap out on a scope and expect it to perform.

    A heavier barrel will benefit you by not shifting point of impact as much as it heats up. It also adds weight which will cut down on recoil.

    Don't forget to get some instruction and practice often. Practice ALOT before you ever attempt to take a long range shot at an animal.
     
  8. Sirmohawk

    Sirmohawk Portland Active Member

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    Thanks for all the info guys, much appreciated. I went ahead and picked up a rifle today at Bi Mart. Got me a Remington 700 in .308. Came a scope too which is cool but when I have some extra coin, I'm gonna upgrade for sure.

    I was checking out a scope they had that was 6-18 X 50 that appeared to be sweet, I might pick that up next. I really want a scope that has actual knobs for adjusting but I am sure those babies are a couple of grand.

    Any suggestions on quality long range optics that are moderately affordable, by affordable I mean $300-$600?
     
  9. jonn5335

    jonn5335 Longview Active Member

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    I suggest you go on over to long range hunting and read and read and read some more . . . There are a lot of factors that go into accurately taking extended range shots. A rifle that shoots a 2" group at a hundred is a perfect enough hunting rifle but as you move out to 600 yards that rifles group expands to 12" and that's without the human and environmental factors. Practice and shoot as much as possible. For optics in that price range your best bet would be to go with Nikon. :twocents:
     
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