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First fully 3D printed gun

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by BadMotel, May 3, 2013.

  1. BadMotel

    BadMotel Bellingham Active Member

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    Pretty interesting that they were able to create a functioning one. I guess we'll see how hard regulations and such hit before they get the blueprints online.

    LINK
     
  2. misplacedtexan

    misplacedtexan Beaverton, OR Active Member

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    mmmmm freedom

    I'd be interested in the next firearm or two he comes out with
     
  3. Frankenrifle

    Frankenrifle Clatskanie Active Member

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    Aren't you allowed to make a legal firearm as long as you stamp it with a serial...and I think turn in something to the ATF? Can't sell or give away the thing though. Not sure what happens on the death of the owner, possibly seized by the ATF then.
     
  4. BadMotel

    BadMotel Bellingham Active Member

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    Here's another article, with images of how the gun is assembled and the barrels for different calibers.

    LINK
     
  5. chrisk86

    chrisk86 Spokane Member

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    Sorry I can't help but laugh when the Asian lady was interviewed and said one of the problems is people of a certain class who were not able to get ahold of weapons like younger people will now be able to get this technology... Sorry but if someone can't afford a $200 gun how the hell will they afford a $8,000 3D printer plus all the other computer programs and materials to print??? Lol
     
  6. elsie

    elsie Way over there on the left Well-Known Member

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  7. michaels

    michaels oregon Active Member

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    I think the cost of the printers have fallen to about 1200 at this point, but I could be wrong.

    To me this is just a novelty gun really.

    It is plastic and doesn't hold up. (yet? who knows)

    Is it even accurate?

    This gun is on par with homemade zip guns in my opinion.

    Just newer and fancier because a computer was involved
     
  8. Kevinkris

    Kevinkris Aloha Well-Known Member

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    just so happens you can make any firearm you want so long as it is a legal type of weapon. making full auto is still illegal but you dont need to have any identifying markings on it at all, nor do you need to report your creation and it can be passed down in estates.
     
  9. GuyBMeredith

    GuyBMeredith Salem, Oregon Active Member

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    I'm skeptical on durability and accuracy. The Youtube video shows what I assume to be a B24 Liberator, but a closer match is the FP-45 Liberator pistol sent to WWII resistance groups. (Dunno whether the dramatic pose is just that or fear that it might blow up in his hands.)

    I saw some remarks about legislation on producing these. Good luck on trying that. Gonna monitor electronic emanations from computer to printer lines?

    As far as cost, $8000 might be a bit much for one individual vs $200, but for a group of people might be a different story.
     
  10. fireninja13

    fireninja13 Newberg / Portland Metro Active Member

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    3d printers may cost $8k now, but in a few years they will be cheap.

    This might look funny and impractical now, but it is the beginning of something that I'm guessing will everything about how we think about and regulate guns.
     
  11. Kevinkris

    Kevinkris Aloha Well-Known Member

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    if im not mistaken their plan originally wasnt necessarily make a highly reliable pistol but one that could fire once if at all. so i wouldnt put much weight into having a liberator that would be a fun gun at the range but would be great for a last ditch effort to keep someone back, in the case a traditional gun was unavailable (which is the point). important to know that there are guns out there in the regular market that has printed frames/receivers and some of you may own one or two. this is only different because its 100% printed.

    also as for the legislation, it would be pointless to pass such a law because if you have any metal working toold in you garage you can make a gun cheaper and with less knowledge legally that could be much more reliable. if you have machining tools and relative skill you could make a great weapon of this sort. even saw a youtube video of a guy showing how to make a lead pipe throw-away 12 ga. shotgun using only an electric drill and a pipe wrench for tools. all of which are perfectly legal and making it illegal for a private individual to make a 3d printed gun would only circumvent peoples' rights. on the other hand i wouldnt be opposed to making it illegal to make a gun that could pass a metal detector, if its not already illegal for a private citizen to do (its already law for a manufacturer). putting a piece of metal in there would solve any issue you may have with that.
     
  12. Netspirit

    Netspirit Bellevue, WA Active Member

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    There is a piece of metal in there - the firing pin was a real nail.
     
  13. fireninja13

    fireninja13 Newberg / Portland Metro Active Member

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    Yep -- the firing pin in a nail they bough from a hardware store. And they put an unnecessary rod in the handle so it would comply with the metal detector laws, but it is not ciritical to the design.

    These guys have also been developing printable parts to circumvent legal bans -- from the Forbes article:

    Wilson hasn’t shied from the growing controversy around his project. The Sandy Hook, Connecticut massacre in which a lone gunman killed twenty children and six adults only increased his sense of urgency to circumvent the anticipated wave of gun control laws. As Congress mulled limits on ammunition magazines larger than ten rounds, Defense Distributed created 3D-printable 30-round magazines for AR-15 and AK-47 rifles. In March, it released a YouTube video of a 3D-printable AR-15 lower receiver that can fire hundreds of rounds without failing. The lower receiver is the regulated body of the gun. Anyone who prints it can skirt gun laws and order the rest of the weapon’s parts by mail.​
    Meet The 'Liberator': Test-Firing The World's First Fully 3D-Printed Gun - Forbes
     
  14. fireninja13

    fireninja13 Newberg / Portland Metro Active Member

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    The idea here isn't creation of guns that will compete with our high quality manufactured stuff -- rather it will completely democratize who can possess a firearm. Imagine if anyone at any time could download a free design and print a reliable, disposable, concealable, plastic handgun. Even if it was only good for 10 rounds of reliable use. . . damn.

    We're pretty close to that being reality.

    The government has almost no way to effectively control this, so I predict that we will see restrictions on purchase of ammunition and reloading supplies.
     
    ronin223 and (deleted member) like this.
  15. michaels

    michaels oregon Active Member

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    You could probably build something more accurate, reliable and durable with some basic hand tools and a trip to the hardware store.

    Probably for around 20 bucks.

    If you had 8 grand to spend (and were bent on making your own homemade gun) you may as well buy a lathe and mill.

    Could even buy some of that fancy stainless steel.

    You might even be able to make something that holds up for more than 600 rounds.
     
  16. michaels

    michaels oregon Active Member

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    You could probably build something more accurate, reliable and durable with some basic hand tools and a trip to the hardware store.

    Probably for around 20 bucks.

    If you had 8 grand to spend (and were bent on making your own homemade gun) you may as well buy a lathe and mill.

    Could even buy some of that fancy stainless steel.

    You might even be able to make something that holds up for more than 600 rounds.
     
  17. ronin223

    ronin223 Portland Active Member

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    it shoots a 22 short

    i think a slam fire shotgun made from steel pipes would be more dangerous.

    But I support his idea, gun ownership is a free which should never be banned.

    this gun represents the 1st AND 2nd amendment all in one object
     
  18. fireninja13

    fireninja13 Newberg / Portland Metro Active Member

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    No doubt you could build a better one from steel -- if you are a skilled fabricator and knowledgeable amateur gunsmith . . The novel thing here is that ANYONE with a computer and a 3D printer can download the electronic file and push one button to print it and have a functional gun. The implications are pretty enormous, especially given the industry predictions re future cost and availability of 3D printers (cheap and widely available in the not-too-distant-future).
     
  19. fireninja13

    fireninja13 Newberg / Portland Metro Active Member

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    Actually, it was test fired with .380. That said, you're spot on re what this represents. . .
     
  20. michaels

    michaels oregon Active Member

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    Fire ninja, I hear what you're saying, but I don't quite agree.

    I really think the only special thing about this printed gun is the technology involved.

    Not to steal the original programmers thunder, its a cool fun thing he did.

    The point I'm trying to get across is that if you want a gun that holds up for 600 rounds, the technology to do that has existed at the local hardware store for years allready.

    This hype about the printed gun reminds me a little about mid 90's internet hype. Cool, different, not quite the game changer its made out to be.

    Yet? Who knows. If I could predict the future accurately and consistently I'd make my living rolling dice.