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First Aid items

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by ATCclears, Sep 8, 2012.

  1. ATCclears

    ATCclears Seattle area, WA Well-Known Member

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  2. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Very informative! The accompanying lists of survival blogs and forums were useful also.
     
  3. nwwoodsman

    nwwoodsman Vernonia Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    I think this is one aspect of prepping that gets overlooked a lot. Everyone talks about guns and #10 cans. When you're doing a lot of manual labor for shelter and heat and hunting and gathering to survive, someone's gonna get hurt or sick. Even in my day pack I carry ibuprofin, immodium, antiseptics and bandages. Gotta think about long term situations also where the injuries and illnesses will be far worse
     
  4. Angie

    Angie Reno, NV Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Great site, thanks for the link.
     
  5. ATCclears

    ATCclears Seattle area, WA Well-Known Member

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    Check out his two eBooks (Burns, and Wounds). He said he intends to write more.

    Peter
     
  6. fyrediver

    fyrediver Seattle Active Member

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    Looks like a good site! Thanks for sharing.

    I'm a firm believer in having alternatives to the 911 system. I'm a firefighter and it doesn't take much to overwhelm the system. Luckily, in a normal day, neighboring jurisdictions provide automatic aid to cover a department that's on a large response. However, in a regional disaster ALL agencies will be overwhelmed and unable to assist their neighbors.

    First aid is just one of the areas we need to train in to be able to provide for our communities. Consider other training like the CERT programs that are available through the local fire departments.
     
    ATCclears and (deleted member) like this.
  7. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    Building slightly on what Fyrediver said, if you have the time and inclination, I highly recommend signing up at your local community college for an EMT course. Even if you don't go on to get your EMT certification it will do a lot to expose you to the procedures, liabilities, techniques, and skills that you may need when dealing with different types of injuries.

    The thing I've noticed is many "preppers" who do have a medical focus worry more about traumatic surface injuries, things that are easy, and obvious to treat. As far as traumatic injury goes, knowing things like the use of a back-board, traction splints, could very well save a life during an emergency. The same thing applies to recognizing signs and symptoms of a pneumothorax, pre-eclampsia, femoral or brachial hemorrhage. Having a BVM, knowing how to use one, and in some cases having to use devices like the combi-tube, or apply supplemental oxygen.

    Another thing to be aware of in our current environment are chronic health conditions like type 2 diabetes. Sometimes these conditions can be maintained with some diagnostic tools and diet.

    First aid doesn't end at band-aids.

    I don't mean to cramp the guy's style, but if you havn't already heard of it. Check out "where there is no doctor" and the whole series of books put out by the same organization. The book focuses entirely on treating common to serious ailments and injuries in austere situations.

    Books and Resources | Hesperian Health Guides