Firearm that brings back most memories of your father?

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Dads favorite gun. Given to him by his grandfather who bought it new in 1934. Has a place of honor in the safe next to the other Colts.

Those are some bakelite target grips on there that had been on there for probably 60 years. I was looking through a box of stuff a couple of years ago from my grandfather and found the original grips. Floored me.


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My first gun...given to me by my Grandfather...He and my Dad taught me to shoot with it.
More importantly they also taught me responsibility and respect with it.....as in I must be responsible with what I do with it...and to respect the life I hunt with it and the land I hunt in.

It is a 1962 Remington 20 gauge 870 Wingmaster with a 28 inch barrel and Modified choke.
The gun has taken many a clay bird as well as rabbits , squirrels and grouse.
I take it hunting each year and always remember dad and grandpa with each shot I take with it.
Andy
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Dad wasn’t into guns but learned to appreciate them in the AF, in the early 50s, and so when he decided to become a deputy sheriff he bought his first. A S&W model 28 “S” prefix Highway Patrolman born in 1960, or ‘61. I can’t remember. Lots of holster wear on it :D

I shoot it every year around his birthday to remember him…
 
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Mine was a Winchester model 94 30.30.. came home from school one day , 1976, to find a Winchester box on the table. I guess dad listened when I kept pointing at the 94 In a tattered Winchester brochure from the white elephant..fell on hard times and had to sell it in 1986. I finally found one close to the condition as mine, serial number only 500 off. It’s not the same gun, but I will never find the one I sold.
 
Sorry to hear that. Mine passed just before Fathers Day and just before I was getting ready to take finals being back in college. Been many Fathers Days since but of course still makes you miss them. Sad part of living to be old is watching others we care about leave before us :( Hopefully after another dozen or so Dad's days pass the pain does go down a lot but, it never goes away sadly. Sometimes when I am giving advice to "young people" I swear I hear his voice in the background saying the same things to me :D
I hear his voice in my voice sometimes. :(
 

CRBMoA

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For me, it is the 512 Remington Sportsmaster that has a bolt with no rearward stop so I am basically the only person on the planet that can run it. My birthday gift at age 11. I still have it, and it still has the 4x scope with electrical tape wrap to make the tube fit the scope mounts.
As Andy said, I learned all I ever needed to know about how to handle guns safely at my dads knee.
I am fortunate to be able to talk to him today. He is 88 and there are not many more years left in the tank.
Mind you, my Dad just sold his full dress Goldwing this spring! He rode until he sold it!
 
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I wish I could have gotten one of my grandfather’s but my cousin’s dad told my grandma that he would keep them in his safe and my aunt eventually divorced him and there went the firearms! And people keep asking me if I’m pissed? “Yeah! I’m still PISSED!”
 

Ura-Ki

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For me, it is the 512 Remington Sportsmaster that has a bolt with no rearward stop so I am basically the only person on the planet that can run it. My birthday gift at age 11. I still have it, and it still has the 4x scope with electrical tape wrap to make the tube fit the scope mounts.
As Andy said, I learned all I ever needed to know about how to handle guns safely at my dads knee.
I am fortunate to be able to talk to him today. He is 88 and there are not many more years left in the tank.
Mind you, my Dad just sold his full dress Goldwing this spring! He rode until he sold it!
I also have Dads Remmy 512 Target, he bought it new from Sears in the early 50's and we always had that little rifle with us on every hike or outdoor adventure! Dad always carried his service issue 1968 Colt 1911 where ever we went, and still carries it today, it has no bluing left on it, and the muzzle end and all the sharp edges have been worn smooth from carry and use, I couldn't even guess at how many thousands of rounds we have all put through that pistol, but it still shoots as good as ever! Another pistol Dad bought when he was a kid was his Ruger MK-1 .22 pistol has always traveled with the family for can plinking and small game hunting or serious target shooting competitions between Dad and my Brothers and I!
Sitting here with Dad across the room, I can just see the butt of his 1911 poking out from the top of his pants, makes me smile! Need to get him some new Factory Colt Pony double Diamond grips for it, the originals are all worn smooth!
 
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JC Higgins model 31 22 rifle. My grandfather, my dad's dad bought it new in 1950.

Finally was allowed to start handling it (after alot of whining and pleading) circa 1966. I was allowed to carry it on Sunday afternoon pheasant hunts when my dad and uncles would get together. Now mind you, I was never going to even shoot at a pheasant, but that didn't matter. I was hunting with the grownups. I was along to walk the standing corn, which towered over me, and help kick up birds.

From there I graduated to shooting gophers in the spring and cottontails in the winter. That's how I learned to shoot.

My father would bring home a box or 2 of 22 ammo, bought at either the coast to coast store or gambles in the small town in SD I grew up in. And 9 out of 10 times it was shorts he'd buy. I still remember those rare times he'd buy a box of long rifle, I felt like I was going on safari.

Very rarely shoot that rifle anymore. Have allowed the 2 oldest grandsons to shoot it. My daughters know it's a family heirloom and once it goes to the grandkids, it will have been part of 5 generations.

Thanks for all you did for me Pop. I miss you terribly.
 
My dad's sporterized 30-06 is a thing of beauty. He hand French Polished the stock before I was born. My mom told me he spent night after night rubbing it out. This is how my dad was. Patience forever with projects. Still have it / shoot it with the old school 70's Bushnell 4x scope. He always talked about Leupold glass so I may upgrade to this one day since it would still honor him.
 

USMC1911

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When he passed I got most all of his firearms.
Most if not all I will never part with. I have a pair of Model 12 shotguns one in 12g and a 20g from the early 1920s that were my great grandfather and grandfathers that have been passed down over the generations.

Most remembered/cherish are a Glenfield model 60 that is the first thing I remember shooting with him. I still remember that day. He found some old random muffler and stuck it over the top of a sapling as a target. Shot that thing till my hearts content. Another was his constant companion a stainless Ruger security six. I will go to the grave with that one or hand it to next in line if that day ever comes. Sure do miss him.
 
My dad was not that much into guns. He grew up during the depression, a first generation of Lithuanian immigrants. He knew quite well what it was like to grow up with nothing and never used that as an excuse. Growing up though I heard many of his stories of when he was in WW2. He was in the signal corps in China. His unit was building weather towers to help prepare for the invasion of Japan. He was in a lot of places though including the Phillipines where he picked up a Ghurka knife and Krag bayonet (which I still have). When I got out of my stint in the Cavalry, dad surprised me. He was a tool and die maker by trade and had built a small zip gun that fired 22LR and was working on a 22LR "wrist gun". Although he hadn't had much to do with guns since he was out of the Army, he rather enjoyed shooting the stuff in the back yard that I had acquired along my journies.
Dad was all business though and one of those subtle geniuses. The big joke among is siblings was that when he died was that he took the formula to cold fusion along with him. Rip dad

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My Dad passed away in 2010 at the age of 93. I am currently restoring his 1969 Browning Hi-Power he bought new. I decided to glamour it up a bit and had the frame color case hardened, and back in 2015 I met Craig Spegel and picked up some of his grips for it. In another month or so I'll post some pics of the completed gun, I still have some trigger/sear work to do.

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Winchester Model 94 30-30. My Father's deer rifle. He carried it in the State Guard during WWII. (They provided their own weapons).

That gun went on a lot of deer hunting trips with us when I was just a young tag-along. When I got older it became mine when my Father upgraded to a Model 70 .270. I still have the 94 Wish I still had the 70.
 

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