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batfbs.jpg
It is important to note that in classifying any frame or receiver, “the Director may consider any associated templates, jigs, molds, equipment, tools, instructions, guides, or marketing materials that are sold, distributed, or possessed with the item or kit, or otherwise made available by the seller or distributor of the item or kit to the purchaser or recipient of the item or kit.” • This change makes clear that many of the products currently marketed and sold as unregulated “80% kits” contain a “frame or receiver” that is regulated by Federal law.
 
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A government agency can't change laws.
Government agencies at the federal, state, and local levels are responsible for enforcing laws passed by legislative bodies. In order to do this, they must be able to create their own policies, procedures, and rules. This is a critical part of administrative law, since legislation often omits some important details. Legislation is created by elected officials, who are directly accountable to voters. The people who create administrative regulations, however, might be elected, or they might be appointed by elected officials. In order to encourage transparency at all stages of the rulemaking process, government agencies are subject to formalized procedures that allow public input.
 

User 1234

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A government agency can't change laws.
Many agencies perform quasi legislative and quasi judicial functions. There are more limits on an agency’s quasi legislative powers than there are on the elected legislature’s lawmaking powers, but the agencies can and do promulgate regulations and if valid a violation of the regulation is a violation of the underlying statute written by the elected legislature.

It of course gets very complicated from there.
 

arakboss

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Look at the bright side of this new rule. Local FFLs will get new business for transfers. It will make it easier for them to sell their serialized firearms and "80%" frames and receivers.

By the way, what aisles does Cabela's, Bimart and Walmart keep their 80% frames and receivers in?
 
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solv3nt

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If I'm reading the summary correctly, it looks like they're not grandfathering existing 80% firearms, how is that going to work?
 

arakboss

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If I'm reading the summary correctly, it looks like they're not grandfathering existing 80% firearms, how is that going to work?
My understanding was that an FFL will have to serialize it. You can bet they will charge a pretty penny for that service. Good thing all my 80 percenters were made before 1968.


This will be a boon for FFLs and eventually a bust for 80% manufactures. I guess the manufactures will sell the pieces separately to get around the "rule" change.
 
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Possession is fine, you just can't sell it without having it serialized.... is my understanding.
My understanding as well - and if this is the case (and someone please correct me if I am wrong) but in effect the basic law of not being able to sell it without serializing it essentially stays the same as it ever was correct?

The only thing changing is making it illegal for companies to Mfg. and sell 80% kits correct?
 
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If I read it right, they/you will still be able to sell the 80% frame or receiver but not with the jig or tools to finish it? Am I wrong?
Any future frame purchases would require an FFL and be serialized. Jigs and such they haven't gone after yet, but... they are leaving themselves the option to do so... is my understanding.
 

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