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Fight muzzle flip with Speed Ledge (VIDEO) Let me know what you think.

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by explorerimports, Aug 7, 2013.

  1. explorerimports

    explorerimports WA Active Member

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    [video=youtube;4jXqxH3a7ko]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jXqxH3a7ko[/video]

    Gear Review: Fight muzzle flip with Speed Ledge (VIDEO)

    I was skeptical about the advantages of an add-on device for the management of recoil, but not so skeptical that I would pass up the chance to try it out. I’m glad I did. The Speed Ledge rocks.

    Recoil pushes back. Shoot a 10 gauge shotgun and you’ll feel that jab in your shoulder. Speed Ledge won’t eliminate recoil. Nothing will. But recoil causes the muzzle to rise out of alignment with your intended target. This is what makes repeat shots harder to make (unless you have a ton of time to realign).

    On rifles and shotguns, forends and extra grips allow your support hand to hold muzzle rise down. But the ATF doesn’t allow forend grips on pistols. That’s taboo. Instead, some try porting barrels or other modifications to help reduce muzzle flip. Sometimes it works.

    But Speed Ledge is different. This aluminum arm attaches to a rail and provides a rest for the thumb of your support hand. With the thumb secure in place, your other fingers wrap up your shooting hand and allow for a rock solid grip.

    There are three main variations of the Speed Ledge. For short pistols there are shorter arms. For longer pistols, longer arms. And one variety has an arm that curves up a bit.

    The fit of the Speed Ledge will be determined by both the size of your hands and the length of the barrel (and the rail, of course). The mechanical advantage is greatly increased by placing the mount as close to the end of the barrel as possible. The pressure exerted on the arm then acts directly against the energy of recoil that causes the muzzle to rise.

    Speed Ledge offers a flat bottomed mount and one with a rail. This way, you can still mount a light or a laser under the Speed Ledge.

    If you are using a pistol for home defense, this is an ideal combination. A good light on the bottom of a pistol with a Speed Ledge would be bulky, but in no way awkward.


    Holstering a Speed Ledge equipped gun might be a bigger problem. But not one that should out-weigh the advantages. Speed Ledge offers a list of holsters that require no modification. They point out also that some Kydex holsters can be reshaped easily enough by heating the Kydex with a hair dryer.

    Leather is a bit more problematic. Unfortunately for us, most gun stores frown on you coming in and testing the fit of holsters in a way that might stretch them out. So it is best to check the list. The FNX Tactical won’t fit in the holster I have for it. But the Walther PPQ I use in the video fits well enough in its leather holster that it would not require any special consideration.


    But I will say this. The device works. If you watch the video above, I’m the last shooter. The Walther PPQ stays almost flat. With just a bit of practice, the Speed Ledge makes shooting fast much more feasible.

    Prices start at $36.95. Each Speed Ledge is made to order, and they will work with you to determine which arm is right for your size and gun. It is well worth it.

    Recoil control pistol thumb rest -- Installs instantly
     
    Corey S likes this.
  2. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    Didn't click/read. What's that abortion in the picture? Where on earth can I get one of those?
     
  3. Lange22250

    Lange22250 Milwaukie Active Member

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  4. Frankenrifle

    Frankenrifle Clatskanie Active Member

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    Doodads on pistols; no. Doodads on longarms; yes. There's just too many variables to bother with something like this on a defensive pistol. I like the concept, it's what fore-grips on rifles are for, but I think the implementation just falls short on a platform that is so small. Too many things to get in the way of a solid draw and engagement.
     
  5. 2Wheels4Ever

    2Wheels4Ever Portland Well-Known Member 2015 Volunteer

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    Original thoughts say no, but I would not be closed to trying it out.
     
  6. Corey S

    Corey S New Member

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    I bought the Speed Ledge initially for my wife when she is shooting my Glock .40 cal. I saw an immediate improvement in her groupings so I decided to try it myself. I went from an 8" grouping during rapid fire to about 4 1/2 in grouping by the time I finished my first magazine. I'm sold! I bought 2 more for myself and daughter. This thing is no gimmick, it really works!
     
  7. Lange22250

    Lange22250 Milwaukie Active Member

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    Yeah, it is a gimmick for anything other than a USPSA limited gun with a race holster.

    The video he posted doesn't show anything special if you actually have a decent grip built.

    You will get a lot more out of really understanding everything that goes into building a grip and running a trigger that will transfer to most other pistols AND still be able to use decent holsters.

    You will not replace good technique with firearm modifications and even worse you may hamper further development.

     
  8. PDXcollector

    PDXcollector Portland Member

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    Everyone's points about the downsides notwithstanding, to dismiss the concept out of hand seems rather close-minded. Don't get me wrong, I'm an old school fart who wouldn't even own a pistol with a rail, but as a mechanical designer by trade, the leverage advantage seems pretty impressive to me.

    You can practice your classic grip to perfection, but you can't argue with geometry. Besides hasn't the official, sanctioned, state-approved, pistol shooting techniques taught to everyone from rent-a-cops to the military evolved over time? Maybe in the future most frames will have this feature built in, maybe not... :p

    The last time I was at the range there was a guy with a 6" bull barrel Ruger Mark II with a Fastfire III. He was using a bizarre technique I've never seen before. He used his support hand to grab some type of insulation he had applied around the barrel and the height of the sight allowed him to look over his fingers. He was amazingly accurate.
     
  9. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like a PPC gun/shooter. Not real "practical" but fun as heck.
     
  10. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    1) I am disinclined to hang something like that off a defensive handgun.

    2) For heavy recoiling handguns I would not want something like that out there to hit my hand.

    3) The website link is broken (it goes to a page that gives an error). When I clicked on a link on the page that referenced the product I then got the product page. The product page doesn't show good pics about how this works.

    4) The vid doesn't really show or explain how the device works. If you had not mentioned the device I would not know that the vid was about the device.

    That said, I would be willing to try the concept to see if it works, but even if it did work I would not be inclined to use it since from what little I can tell, it would be something to hang up on clothing, holsters, etc. and might also hit my hand with a different shooting style.

    I prefer hybrid comps for muzzle flip control. By "hybrid comp" I mean this:

    hybridnortop.jpg

    These have worked very well for me.

    They are louder, and they have other disadvantages, but they work well.
     
  11. mkwerx

    mkwerx Forest Grove, OR Well-Known Member

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    If you have a polymer framed pistol and want to make it uglier - you can "build" a ledge yourself in about ten minutes, using a soldering iron to melt/move/shape the polymer above the trigger guard, and not give up rail space, and not spend $49.95.

    The concept is good - but doo-dads like this are for plinkers, not serious business guns. On a "working" gun, I don't want anything that could hang up and hinder the draw, and I don't want anything that will be stabbing me in the side when it's holstered.
     
  12. PDXcollector

    PDXcollector Portland Member

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    If the concept is good, someone will find a way to make it work, what about a recess?