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Favorite World War II era Handgun(s)?

ZigZagZeke

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My mother was born in 1915. Her .32acp pistol was made in 1918. I still have it and shoot it today. I have the original grips and a set of ivories for it. I picked up an antique, hand made pancake holster for it a while back. It's really a baby 1911...the Colt 1903 pocket model, type I. That model was issued as a general officer's pistol in WWII and up to about 1970, I'm told. Parts are rare and quite expensive. An original production magazine will run you about $200. The generic brass #4-56 shoulder screw on the right side that is retaining the slide lock safety in the first two pictures was recently replaced with an authentic original blued steel shoulder screw (shown in third picture) for $25.
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1. Good ol M1911A1
2. German P08
3. Inglis Hi Power
I own or have owned these,
plus soviet Tok, Inglis-made Chinese C-96, LendLease victory .38, P-38, (all of these latter sold or traded off over the years). I really wondered sometimes what stories they could have told...
The P38 had a german name written in the holster and "Berlin".. Never was able to snag any of the Berettas or an Enfield. There's something to be said about starting young and being a gun-show tradin fool.. I guess both the big import "dumps" are over:(, and so are gun-shows as we knew them:mad:.
 
My mother was born in 1915. Her .32acp pistol was made in 1918. I still have it and shoot it today. I have the original grips and a set of ivories for it. I picked up an antique, hand made pancake holster for it a while back. It's really a baby 1911...the Colt 1903 pocket model, type I. That model was issued as a general officer's pistol in WWII and up to about 1970, I'm told. Parts are rare and quite expensive. An original production magazine will run you about $200. The generic brass shoulder #4-56 screw on the right side that is retaining the slide lock safety in the first two pictures was recently replaced with an authentic original blued steel shoulder screw (shown in third picture) for $25.
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Very nice- exquisite ivory grips!
 

GWS

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1911, followed by the High Power
Lugers are pretty cool too but too expensive for me ever get one.
 
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So, since it is December 7th, and the fact I was engaging in system test cycles so standard/routine I can do them in my sleep, I watched/listened to a bunch of Pearl Harbor related documentaries today. I avoided the bullplop ones, but focused on ones done by real historians. Most of the material I already knew, but there were some interesting insights.

All that aside, due to the footage, I thought I'd toss this out for discussion: what are your favorite World War II-era handguns? Those would be pistols and revolvers available in the 1939—1945 time-frame. And, why so? Have pics to share?

Thanks!
love the 1911 and the Nambu14. Have one of both. A 2010 1911 and 1945 Nambu14.:)
 
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I have a couple of WWII pistols.

The Nambu is functional but this one manufactured in May 1944 is crude in fit and finish, not surprising since Japan was losing the war at this point. The bolt locks back on the last shot but when you remove the magazine it releases the bolt. Removing the magazine requires a strong pull. When you insert the fresh magazine you have to pull back on the cocking knob. Not exactly great for a quick reload. Not the pistol I would want to take into battle.

The P38 below was made by Mauser in 1944. The fit and finish is much better than the Nambu even though Germany was also losing the war at this point. Definitely a better pistol and would be my choice over the Nambu.


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Great Nambu !! I have a very late June 1945 Nambu and its not too crude, but definitely simpler than the 44. Slab side grips and lightly blued. I have seen an July 1945 made from left over parts and they are very crude. I agree they are not the most user friendly handgun out there.
 

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