Failure to Fire in 12 Gague NEF Pardner Protector

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by 56kninja, Dec 14, 2009.

  1. 56kninja

    56kninja
    Portland
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    Well. I'm not sure that this warrants an entire thread, but I don't know much when it comes to shotguns. And I want to know everything I can about my gun.

    I just got it last friday, a NEF Pardner Protector. I took it out to shoot yesterday, and put 55 rounds through it. 54 went off with a hitch.

    I was shooting Remington Game loads, Bird Shot. The 5.00 boxes, with the black shells. I can get more specific later as I still have all the shells and the boxes with them.

    Anyways, I got about through with the first box, and i heard the click. So I opened the action thinking that maybe it was just empty (but I was pretty sure there was more). But an unfired shell popped out and the next one popped into the breach. I looked down at it, and jumped back a bit. I went on firing the rest, and then finally went to the unfired shot.

    I picked it up, the primer was dented.. So I just picked it up, put it in the shotgun and then fired it. This time everything went properly.

    Wondering what could cause this.
     
  2. Throckmorton

    Throckmorton
    Florence,Ore ah gone
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    Even factory ammo will give u a glitch now and then.probably just a hard primer.
    Keep shooting and see if it happens again with different ammo,etc. May not ever happen again.
     
  3. soberups

    soberups
    Newberg
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    If the primer had a good dent in it, then the problem is the ammo not the gun. I run into that problem all the time with my 10/22 using bulk pack Remington ammo...sometimes the primers just dont ignite, but if you rechamber the same round and try again it fires.
     
  4. clearconscience

    clearconscience
    Vancouver, WA
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    Yeah I would agree. You do come across bad rounds. You need to be really careful when that happens make sure you wait with the gun pointed down range before you eject it. That round may still go off. I don't know if I would have tried to fire it again.
     
  5. ogre

    ogre
    Vancouver, WA
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    I'm guessing it was not a hard primer; the problem sounds like a high primer to me. In other words the primer was not seated deeply enough during manufacture. Perhaps your first attempt dented the primer but fully seated it into the case. Your second attempt then fired the fully seated primer. It is a fairly common problem that can be easily remedied by running your fingers over the cartridge cases and checking for high primers when you open a fresh box.
     
  6. Riot

    Riot
    Benton County, Washington
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    what he said...you could have had a slow burning primer as well.
     
  7. OFADAN

    OFADAN
    Brownsville, OR
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    No worries...typical phase one malfunction. For defensive purposes we teach a non-diagnostic method where you don't want to stand around trying to figure out what just happened but instead clear the malfunction, reload and continue engaging your threat or scanning and searching the threat area.

    We sell high end plastic training cartridges (shotshells) in the Pro Shop so you can intentionally set up frequent unscheduled malfunctions in order to practice how to clear these malfunctions without "thinking, dinking or looking."

    No big deal...just a part of fight'n and shooting your Protector
     

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