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Mortality

Most live their lives unaware of their mortality.

Unless they joined the military service, the most dangerous thing an American does deals with transportation. Driving a car or flying in a plane are inherently dangerous endeavors. But because most everyone drives, and a majority fly, everyone is comfortable with the increase in danger compared to the benefits that these modes of transportation provide. So, the average American is not aware of their Mortality.

Even though Military Members are young and have that air of invincibility, they are fully aware of their Mortality. As a US Navy Submariner, every single time we go to sea, we know that it may be the last time we see our loved ones. Not only are we concerned with enemies of the USA, but the environment is literally trying to kill us. We Are The Mighty had an article that states the estimated operating depth of modern submarines as 300m to 450m, which equates to 984 to 1476 feet. This means that the estimated operating depth is exerting 404 psi to 621 psi on the hull of the boat. When you think about 984 feet that's just larger than 3 football fields, that's less than a ¼ mile for you car enthusiasts.The average ocean depth is 2.3 miles, this means that we are only operating at the first 0.18 to 0.27 miles according to the estimates.

When you decide to carry a weapon, you become more aware of mortality than the average American. One of the lessons from the military that has stayed with me is a key to survival is to survive first contact.

Health is paramount to survival. The reason I'm sharing this is to give Hope to those facing their mortality head on.

Here's my story…

In 2013 I convinced my Mom to move out west after living alone for 12 years after my Dad passed away. It's a good thing she lived with us while she was traveling. She was 74 when diagnosed with Cancer in Oct 14, 2015. My Mom's Ovarian cancer is attributed to BRCA2 positive gene mutation. Genetic testing done in May 25, 2016 showed the BRCA2 positive mutation. She is now 80 and has been winning these past 5.5 years.

For almost 2 years I advocated for the genetic test but was denied by insurance. After finding precancerous polyps during my colonoscopy, my PCP was able to push the insurance to allow the genetic testing. in 2018, I found out that I'm also BRCA2 positive gene mutation and started early detection tests for Prostate by monitoring my PSA levels early.

For men, the BRCA2 genetic mutation increases the chances of Prostate, Pancreatic, Melanoma, Testicular and male Breast Cancer.

Within the past 8 months my PSA increased, 2.1 on Sept 2020 and then double to 4.51 on Mar 2021. One month later it was 5.4 on Apr 30. Urologist consult 5 days later, and the biopsy on May 7. Pathology report published one week later on May 14 shows that I have high Gleason Grade Prostate Cancer in 4 of the 12 sites. Even though my cancer has not grown in size and my prostate feels normal for a 53 year old, one site has Grade 5 and 4 which are aggressive and can become metastatic. Treatment is surgey and radiation if necessary.

Bone scan was done, May 26 to check if metastasis occurred, and results came back May 27, thank God that it has not.

MRI was June 29 and the Pre-op consult Jul 2 showed that the cancer did not metastasize. The surgery was the following week Thursday, July 8th.

I needed to drop weight 10-15 pounds so that the surgery is easier. So, that was my focus for the 7 weeks prior. I had already renewed my working out, aerobic and weight training. My cousin dealing with breast cancer told me about Intermittent Fasting and after finding the Johns Hopkins article on it, I added that to my tools. I'm also Diabetic so have already been watching what I eat.

My surgery was July 8th and I lost 16 pounds. Post op recovery isn't a walk in the park, they don't talk about the pain. There's two pain locations, the abdomen and the pubic area. Not to mention the recovery of your gastric system. Then there's the Foley Catheter. I'll leave the care and description of it to Google. The catheter was in 8 days and the day it was removed the Urologist gave me the pathology report. The results show that the prostate cancer was contained and the lymph nodes are clear.

I'm currently 14 days post op and starting to feel like normal. I actually feel like I can un-pause and get back to enjoying life. I still have more recovery and then scheduled checks but feel optimistic.

"Approximately 39.5% of men and women will be diagnosed with cancer at some point during their lifetimes."

What are you doing to find it as early as possible so that you can fight it and survive? Unlike Pokémon, I don't want to catch them all but I'm on the lookout for them.

When I found out in 2018 that I was BRCA2 Positive, I told my siblings that they need to find out. They didn't listen then, but they are now. They owe it to their kids to find out if they may have to worry about this being passed on. I've already talked with my adult children about what this means for them, and they've already taken measures.

Knowledge is power. Better to know and then make plans.

Be well everyone.
 
This life ain't easy, if it was everyone would be doing it! Glad you got through this with out more serious concerns, and the road to mending seems smooth enough! Getting old ain't for sissies, glad you're kickin' arse and takin names, Phuck Cancer!!!

I lost my first wife to Ovarian cancer when we were just kids just starting life, and I lost my Mother to the same damn thing! We all did the tests for genetic markers, and we all came back at risk, so we are all getting the proper tests done ahead of the recommended start ages, and so far, so good!
 
I am glad to hear your surgery went well and that you're on the road to recovery.

I lost my best friend to cancer just a few years ago. He fought hard for as long as he could. A couple weeks ago I visited his favorite restaurant and ordered his favorite meal... I still think about him often, but it was a reminder of how nothing in life is a guarantee, and to make the best of the limited and uncertain time we have in this realm.

-Robert
 
This life ain't easy, if it was everyone would be doing it! Glad you got through this with out more serious concerns, and the road to mending seems smooth enough! Getting old ain't for sissies, glad you're kickin' arse and takin names, Phuck Cancer!!!

I lost my first wife to Ovarian cancer when we were just kids just starting life, and I lost my Mother to the same damn thing! We all did the tests for genetic markers, and we all came back at risk, so we are all getting the proper tests done ahead of the recommended start ages, and so far, so good!
Sorry for your loss, Brother. Hope your family can get through without further loss.

I'm hoping that I didn't pass along this gene to my kids, but we're still trying to get them tested.

Can we finally find the cure for Cancer and implement it?

I'm doing my part to break the stigma of discussing Cancer.
 
Hope you have a speedy and PERMANENT recovery. I've known several men who went through prostate cancer, one of which had it come back several times, the stress of which had aged him horribly. I believe it will end up killing him, sadly. Your 50s are too young for life changing illnesses.
 
Sorry for your loss, Brother. Hope your family can get through without further loss.

I'm hoping that I didn't pass along this gene to my kids, but we're still trying to get them tested.

Can we finally find the cure for Cancer and implement it?

I'm doing my part to break the stigma of discussing Cancer.
Medical Tech has come light years in just my short time on this place. Still sadly many find out they are now "short timers" but, just look at what they have managed to do. Its of course sooooo much harder when some "kid" gets hit. I was told in the early 90's that I had a disease with no cure and to not make long term plans. I went off the deep end figuring well short time, fun time. Man it's amazing I lived through it. Met Wife during the time when life for me consisted of work, party, work, party. She sidelined that for me. I soon did not miss the fast lane. Then they really pulled one on me and came up with a cure that had no side effects and "fixed me". Many who know me are still kicking that I am still around and speaking my mind :D
For those who are ill and can't be cured I just hope medical tech can at least keep them comfortable for the time they have left. One "downside" to living longer than I was supposed to has been seeing some I have come to care for leave before me.
 
Medical Tech has come light years in just my short time on this place. Still sadly many find out they are now "short timers" but, just look at what they have managed to do. Its of course sooooo much harder when some "kid" gets hit. I was told in the early 90's that I had a disease with no cure and to not make long term plans. I went off the deep end figuring well short time, fun time. Man it's amazing I lived through it. Met Wife during the time when life for me consisted of work, party, work, party. She sidelined that for me. I soon did not miss the fast lane. Then they really pulled one on me and came up with a cure that had no side effects and "fixed me". Many who know me are still kicking that I am still around and speaking my mind :D
For those who are ill and can't be cured I just hope medical tech can at least keep them comfortable for the time they have left. One "downside" to living longer than I was supposed to has been seeing some I have come to care for leave before me.
You got me curious wondering what you had.
 
When my stepdad was dealing with cancer, he also was being treated for cataracts. The dr. he was seeing at the time looked at me and said, "no matter what, you live long enough, you're gonna have either cancer or cataracts."
That guy was a dick.
 
Mortality

Most live their lives unaware of their mortality.

Unless they joined the military service, the most dangerous thing an American does deals with transportation. Driving a car or flying in a plane are inherently dangerous endeavors. But because most everyone drives, and a majority fly, everyone is comfortable with the increase in danger compared to the benefits that these modes of transportation provide. So, the average American is not aware of their Mortality.

Even though Military Members are young and have that air of invincibility, they are fully aware of their Mortality. As a US Navy Submariner, every single time we go to sea, we know that it may be the last time we see our loved ones. Not only are we concerned with enemies of the USA, but the environment is literally trying to kill us. We Are The Mighty had an article that states the estimated operating depth of modern submarines as 300m to 450m, which equates to 984 to 1476 feet. This means that the estimated operating depth is exerting 404 psi to 621 psi on the hull of the boat. When you think about 984 feet that's just larger than 3 football fields, that's less than a ¼ mile for you car enthusiasts.The average ocean depth is 2.3 miles, this means that we are only operating at the first 0.18 to 0.27 miles according to the estimates.

When you decide to carry a weapon, you become more aware of mortality than the average American. One of the lessons from the military that has stayed with me is a key to survival is to survive first contact.

Health is paramount to survival. The reason I'm sharing this is to give Hope to those facing their mortality head on.

Here's my story…

In 2013 I convinced my Mom to move out west after living alone for 12 years after my Dad passed away. It's a good thing she lived with us while she was traveling. She was 74 when diagnosed with Cancer in Oct 14, 2015. My Mom's Ovarian cancer is attributed to BRCA2 positive gene mutation. Genetic testing done in May 25, 2016 showed the BRCA2 positive mutation. She is now 80 and has been winning these past 5.5 years.

For almost 2 years I advocated for the genetic test but was denied by insurance. After finding precancerous polyps during my colonoscopy, my PCP was able to push the insurance to allow the genetic testing. in 2018, I found out that I'm also BRCA2 positive gene mutation and started early detection tests for Prostate by monitoring my PSA levels early.

For men, the BRCA2 genetic mutation increases the chances of Prostate, Pancreatic, Melanoma, Testicular and male Breast Cancer.

Within the past 8 months my PSA increased, 2.1 on Sept 2020 and then double to 4.51 on Mar 2021. One month later it was 5.4 on Apr 30. Urologist consult 5 days later, and the biopsy on May 7. Pathology report published one week later on May 14 shows that I have high Gleason Grade Prostate Cancer in 4 of the 12 sites. Even though my cancer has not grown in size and my prostate feels normal for a 53 year old, one site has Grade 5 and 4 which are aggressive and can become metastatic. Treatment is surgey and radiation if necessary.

Bone scan was done, May 26 to check if metastasis occurred, and results came back May 27, thank God that it has not.

MRI was June 29 and the Pre-op consult Jul 2 showed that the cancer did not metastasize. The surgery was the following week Thursday, July 8th.

I needed to drop weight 10-15 pounds so that the surgery is easier. So, that was my focus for the 7 weeks prior. I had already renewed my working out, aerobic and weight training. My cousin dealing with breast cancer told me about Intermittent Fasting and after finding the Johns Hopkins article on it, I added that to my tools. I'm also Diabetic so have already been watching what I eat.

My surgery was July 8th and I lost 16 pounds. Post op recovery isn't a walk in the park, they don't talk about the pain. There's two pain locations, the abdomen and the pubic area. Not to mention the recovery of your gastric system. Then there's the Foley Catheter. I'll leave the care and description of it to Google. The catheter was in 8 days and the day it was removed the Urologist gave me the pathology report. The results show that the prostate cancer was contained and the lymph nodes are clear.

I'm currently 14 days post op and starting to feel like normal. I actually feel like I can un-pause and get back to enjoying life. I still have more recovery and then scheduled checks but feel optimistic.

"Approximately 39.5% of men and women will be diagnosed with cancer at some point during their lifetimes."

What are you doing to find it as early as possible so that you can fight it and survive? Unlike Pokémon, I don't want to catch them all but I'm on the lookout for them.

When I found out in 2018 that I was BRCA2 Positive, I told my siblings that they need to find out. They didn't listen then, but they are now. They owe it to their kids to find out if they may have to worry about this being passed on. I've already talked with my adult children about what this means for them, and they've already taken measures.

Knowledge is power. Better to know and then make plans.

Be well everyone.
Courage, that's what you have Brother. I don't know that I could have told that story were it me.
It's like many things in life, we find out who we really are when it happens. Bless you for offering
this insight. To what degree, I don't know, but you've made yourself stronger telling this and you've
also given a measure of strength to me as well. Thank you . . . . .
 
You got me curious wondering what you had.
Hepatitis C. When they found I had it they did not even have a name for it yet. As time went on they did. Had some "treatments" that were often as bad as the disease. One they came up with was like having Chemo for a year and was having some success with some big time side effects. They ran tests on me and would not give it as they were afraid I would die from the treatment. Then several years ago an Israeli Co hit on a cure with zero side effects. When I took it I felt nothing, and it worked.
 
Hepatitis C. When they found I had it they did not even have a name for it yet. As time went on they did. Had some "treatments" that were often as bad as the disease. One they came up with was like having Chemo for a year and was having some success with some big time side effects. They ran tests on me and would not give it as they were afraid I would die from the treatment. Then several years ago an Israeli Co hit on a cure with zero side effects. When I took it I felt nothing, and it worked.
Outstanding!

Hep C used to be a death sentence. Just a matter of time, but sooner or later it was gonna kill you. Glad you're still around.
 
Outstanding!

Hep C used to be a death sentence. Just a matter of time, but sooner or later it was gonna kill you. Glad you're still around.
A lot of people were sad to hear that they cured me :s0140:
The drug they came up with was a game changer. Just another of the breakthroughs we have seen in the last few decades. There was as always a LOT of whining about cost but, if there was not a profit motive the stuff would never have been invented.
 
A lot of people were sad to hear that they cured me :s0140:
The drug they came up with was a game changer. Just another of the breakthroughs we have seen in the last few decades. There was as always a LOT of whining about cost but, if there was not a profit motive the stuff would never have been invented.
Waaay cheaper to the system in the long run, too.
 
Gryghin.

Your post could wake up some guys who don't bother with PSA or the much less pleasant physical exam because they don't want the intrusion or worry. I get both fears. However, most times you have a chance for a pretty good prognosis for recovery with early detection Death is way worse than the exam.

My PSA exploded while I was in my fifties too. I was followed by an excellent urologist. I was lucky and so it was mostly watchful waiting. Oh I had biopsies (8 total) and seed implantation so a bit more than that at times until surgery in 2016. Great outcome and well worth it all. BRCA2 runs in my family too, mom passed from ovarian cancer and my niece chose radical mast when she tested positive to, after her mother was diagnosed with Breast Cancer. Point is we all have a much better chance of beating cancer now than ever before. Get tested. I'm 67.5 years-and going strong.
 
Gryghin.

Your post could wake up some guys who don't bother with PSA or the much less pleasant physical exam because they don't want the intrusion or worry. I get both fears. However, most times you have a chance for a pretty good prognosis for recovery with early detection Death is way worse than the exam.

My PSA exploded while I was in my fifties too. I was followed by an excellent urologist. I was lucky and so it was mostly watchful waiting. Oh I had biopsies (8 total) and seed implantation so a bit more than that at times until surgery in 2016. Great outcome and well worth it all. BRCA2 runs in my family too, mom passed from ovarian cancer and my niece chose radical mast when she tested positive to, after her mother was diagnosed with Breast Cancer. Point is we all have a much better chance of beating cancer now than ever before. Get tested. I'm 67.5 years-and going strong.
YEP!! No guy likes the Doc,the tests, poking,proding and such but, I get in to see the guy every year. If he says I need a test I get it. Tell him I pay him because I want a pro. Got my first great plauge shot other day due to him. Asked to get in for an overdue check and he said no unless I take the shots. I had no intention of getting them until he said that. So rolled into a wally and said hit me. So far not growing a tail or such.😁 After I get the second one I will call him back and say ok got your damn shots Doc.😁
 
I am a poster child for wearing sunscreen and seeing a dermatologist. I had melanoma in 2004 (a spot on my low back that never saw sun). They got it all and it did not spread. Fast Forward to 2019. The wifey saw a spot on the back of my knee. It looked like a blood blister (not a typical melanoma). From the time we saw it to the time I was able to be seen was 1 month. Even the derm thought it was something other than melanoma. I got the call that it was melanoma and it was deep. They did surgery, unfortunately it had spread to a lymph node (which was removed).

they started me on a therapy designed to kill any leftover cells. It worked well for 10 months then it quit working. I started another therapy that worked well for 7 months.. and, you guessed it, it stopped working also. I am on my 3rd form of therapy starting today.

A couple of thoughts on having cancer.. Cancer is EXPENSIVE! A 1 month supply of this new medication is 32,000 a month…

when first diagnosed, mortality is the only thing you think of. After ups and downs, you finally become at ease with your mortality.
Remember, there are only two things guaranteed in this life.. Death and taxes (And extra taxes for tax stamps).

Moral of the story.. please wear sunscreen and cover up while shooting, fishing or just living life.. if a mole or spot looks weird or different, get it checked…
 

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