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Esee 3 - Survival Knife

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by Vaultman, Dec 8, 2014.

  1. Vaultman

    Vaultman Clackamas Co, Oregon Active Member

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    I have been hooked on survival knives lately. Like, all I think about in my spare time. I have pocket knives, a few anyway, but no real survivor type knife. I am not so looking for a "Oops I got lost in the woods, I am glad I have my survival knife on me". I am more looking for the "I am going out for a weekend outing on foot, and I am glad I have my survival knife." Been looking at: Ka-Bar BK7, Esee 3 and 4, SOG Seal pup, and other various ones. Been thinking that I would get the Esee 3, in the theory that if I like it and feel I need something bigger maybe go with the BK7 , or the Esee 6.

    So, I am curious about what people think about the Esee 3. I have even considered using it as my EDC blade, but without having a store around that caries them, I have not handled one and have no idea how well that would work. The steel may be to think for that, I don't know. Any advice may help.
     
  2. decklin

    decklin WA Well-Known Member

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    The esee 3 would be well suited as an EDC blade or as a companion to a larger knife for survival. The esee 3 should work fine for small, detailed work.
    My concern would be its ability for work. Meaning wood processing, shelter building, weapon, etc.
    I love backcountry camping. I go with a tarp, hammock, and my dog.
    I bring a rush 24 I've modified some. My knife is a ka-bar becker bk9. I pair it with a buck 110 folder for delicate work. The bk9 is probably bigger than what I really need but I really like it.
    I would be afraid of breaking the esee 3 while batoning or some other high stress task.
     
  3. Martini_Up

    Martini_Up NW USA Well-Known Member

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    For the $$, the Seal Pup is your man.

    And the ESEE 4 is waaay better than the 3. But you'll need to get upgraded grip panels so your pinky finger isn't hanging out in the breeze.

    My pack has the BK7 with micarta scales... (IMO, ANY BK knife should be upgraded with the micarta scales) http://www.knifecenter.com/item/KAB...Linen-Micarta-Handle-Slabs-Knife-Not-Included
    and the Bk7 is by far my favorite - able to handle all tasks from cleaning just legal sized trout to splitting firewood.

    But then again, I carried a Bark River when hunting this season... last year it was a Tre Kronor... <sigh>before that I tried my grandfathers Western and before that a Gerber LMFII....

    Sorry, I"m no help. I like them all.
     
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  4. John Gault

    John Gault clackamas county Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I've got an ESEE 3 and and ESEE 5, Need an ESEE 4 now. I let the wife use the ESEE 3 when we go day hiking and such. The 5 is a tad big for day hiking but I'll keep it for SHTF rough duty work.

    Bottom line for me is as mentioned above. Get the ESEE 4 for carry. You're welcome to check out my 3 if we can meet up. I'm out Sandy way.
     
  5. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    :s0122:
     
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  6. decklin

    decklin WA Well-Known Member

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    image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg Becker BK9 with micarta scales
     
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  7. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    "The esee 3 would be well suited as an EDC blade or as a companion to a hatchet or small axe
    My concern would be its ability for work. Meaning wood processing, shelter building, weapon, etc."

    Fixed that first sentence for you
    My job on you tube has been to ridicule posers that think knives are for 'wood processing',which they aren't.That's what a axe or hatchet is for.
    Batoning wood is ridiculous,it's hard on your knife that you may well need at some point for what it WAS MADE FOR,it's hard on your wrists,which you will definitely need ,and the #1 reason is,if there is large wood then there is SMALLER WOOD too.No need to split wood if there is smaller wood around.
    But what do I know of making fires for around 50+ years? And splitting wood for most of that too!

    Your knife should be a good heavy blade like the esse or BKs but something imaginable.Something for small jobs.If you really want to have a HUGE blade then carry a machete.About the same weight as one of those monster knives but twice as long........for cutting brush.

    Sure Knife makers are considering the "bushcraft" kids want to be cool and "baton" their knives,(don't get it) to split wood,and are making thicker blades.Still doesn't make it the correct procedure
    I know how to hurt your wrists.And the way they baton wood nowa days will put some out of business in the right conditions

    Watch some of this kid's videos.He can make a fire without splitting wood!
    Amazing!
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7s5WAyhEdqv-huwhR0HjVA
     
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  8. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I agree.

    I don't abuse my knives, especially in a survival situation - way too valuable for survival.

    Small kindling should be available. Anything larger should be burnt as is.

    I would carry a hatchet for such tasks as splitting wood, etc.
     
    mjbskwim likes this.
  9. powersbj

    powersbj Seattle Area Active Member

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    Buck special, leatherman for the fine stuff.
     
  10. seemenot

    seemenot Member

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    I know that this option is a little more money but I love my ZT 0100 so much I just bought a second one. MSRP of $360 but can be bought on Ebay for around $180. pretty tough to beat it.
     
  11. decklin

    decklin WA Well-Known Member

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    I carry an estwing hatchet with me but the op was specifically asking about knives.
    And knives, when properly built, are for wood processing. Age is no excuse to be rude.
     
  12. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    Well I guess I am confused:confused: Are we talking knives,hatchets or tools in a survival situation?
     
  13. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    How was I rude? Telling the truth is rude now? Or are you one of the guys on You Tube showing the wrong way to process wood for a fire?
    Like I said,just because the knife makers make their knives tough enough to do it,doesn't make it the proper way to process wood.Building a fire shouldn't have to be done with an axe or knife if possible.Just collect the proper size wood and put the long ones in the fire to burn in half.
    Unless fire has changed,it should work the same as it did in the 60's and 70's
    And yes he did ask about knives and I just wanted to explain what they aren't for .
    The larger knives are great if you actually need them for a weapon,but for most 'bushcraft',so the younger generation understands,a small utility knife and a machete for brush would be more effective,along with a small axe.If you aren't in a brushy environment,then leave the machete at home.
    Most of the larger,8-9in blades are for the 'cool' factor and way more blade than a person needs .
    Heck I dress out and butcher my deer with a small filet knife and maybe a cleaver or axe for the pelvic bone

    Sorry to hijack the thread but this is in the preparedness section
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2014
  14. decklin

    decklin WA Well-Known Member

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    I guess it's hard for me to consider someone polite when my very first interaction involves them correcting my post and going on to explain it's his job to ridicule youtube posers.
     
  15. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    :D Is this going to turn into a peeing match?:s0140:
     
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  16. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I have yet to see a knife that someone doesn't have a youtube vid posted, of them destroying it by batoning or prying or throwing or otherwise abusing it, and then proclaiming how useless it is.

    Sorry, but the only way I would abuse a general "survival" knife like that would be if it definitely was a life and death situation and only what I was doing would keep me alive. To me, that would be like using the butt of a revolver for pounding nails into a post - wrong tool, wrong usage.

    And even then, I would have second thoughts about it if it was the only knife I had on me.

    I usually carry a Gerber Prodigy (smaller brother to the LMF II which I also have) and at least one other fixed blade knife when out in the woods, or in my GHB (the reason I would have two knives would be in case one got lost - e.g., dropped in a river/lake, etc.).

    It's not an ESEE, but it is stout enough for how I use it - I got one for myself, and one for each of my kids (I have a number of other survival knifes that I paid less than $100 for that are backups, barter items and tools I would hand out to less prepared family).

    I like both knives for their blade shape and the rubber handle covering - I am a big believer in non-slip rubber coverings on tools - I have seen a lot of tools become dangerous because they could not be held safely when wet, and six months out of the year here, it is wet and then some.

    I have a couple of decent lightweight hatchets that are fine for splitting small wood (at least, they are much better at it than a knife), or chopping branches, or pounding on things (like the pelvic bone or spine of a deer).

    Either one of my grandfathers (one a farmer who worked the fields by hand, the other an old time outdoorsman, both worked extensively with hand tools) or my dad would have smacked me upside the head if they saw me abusing a knife that way.
     
  17. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    I wonder why nobody makes a good all purpose tool that has a skinning knife blade? All the pocket tool makers sure missed the boat by not thinking on how to sell a tool to the guys most apt to buy them.o_O

    I picked up for a chopper a US MC knife/short machete for a SHTF, I was thinking versatility. I have a super sharp Norwegian whalers knife for skinning and a US folder for general purpose. It's what I think will work for me.o_O
     
  18. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I bought a KA BAR Kukri for a "chopper" when it was on sale. It works better than the Gerber hooked brush cutter for limbs and saplings since the Kukri has more weight and thickness, whereas a machete or brush cutter works better for vines and brambles as you get more speed with it.

    But I doubt I will ever use either one off my property unless I know that is the kind of "knife" I would specifically need.

    I've done well with a 5 to 6" general purpose blade and a light hatchet when hunting. I prefer the blade to more abruptly turn upwards toward the tip, but to have more of a straight back than a drop or clip point. I find such a shape to be more useful, and yet I can still poke through things if I have to. The blades with more of a point are more prone (at least in my inept hands) to inadvertently poke through things (like a hide, or internal organs) when I don't want to poke through them.

    I also have a Cold Steel Survival Edge - typical inexpensive (less than $25) "survival knife" with a hollow handle. Looks and feels like a copy of a Mora (maybe made by them - I don't know), very lightweight and handy for small food prep chores. I put a fire start kit and compass in the handle, and I put a grey non-reflective patina on the shiny SS blade with sulfuric acid and vinegar.

    Yes it is not full tang - the tang ends right behind the hilt, but surprisingly it is stout and hard to break - at least that is what a vid on youtube indicates where a guy puts it in a vice and bends it over trying to break it. I would never abuse it that way.
     
  19. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    Anyone catch the story on the news today about the guy who was attacked by a 500 lb bear and he killed it with a 5 inch hunting blade?o_O
     
  20. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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