Empty roung slide release? Is that a bad thing?

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by Phillyfan, Mar 1, 2014.

  1. Phillyfan

    Phillyfan
    Oregon City, Oregon
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    So I was at Sportsman's (or whatever they call it this week) and asked to look at a Beretta 92fs. The gentleman handed it to me after clearing it (have to say I have dealt with him in the past and he is a very nice guy, older retired military is my guess), anyway he handed it to me with the chamber open and once I received it I dropped the mag, looked and replaced it (a good habit I think) and released the slide with the slide release. I let it go back into battery freely, and he jumped and said that you shouldn't do that on an empty chamber. He showed me how you should hold the slide and ease it back. I was a little annoyed, as I am not new to firearms, but out of respect I let him show me the way, and said nothing. After all, he is an old timer who might know something I don't. On top of that, you don't disrespect your elders, even if you think they might be wrong.

    Anyway, the thing is I do this (releasing the slide freely) when I practice dry firing all the time. Am I doing something that could harm my pistols in the long run? I didn't think so, but I am not an expert. Should I be holding the slide and controlling the release?

    I don't see how letting it fall back naturally would harm anything, but I am open to opinions.
     
  2. idahoan

    idahoan
    Boise, Idaho
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    On a tuned up 1911, yes letting the slide slam home is generally considered a bad idea, but on pretty much any production gun,even a 92fs its no problem, bubblegum its part of the standard clearing on an M9.
     
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  3. Phillyfan

    Phillyfan
    Oregon City, Oregon
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    That's what I thought. I mean, I understand not dry firing a .22 pistol, but letting the slide go back to where it is supposed to would be a good thing, over time. Just seems like it would form a natural fit. Don't see how that would harm anything.
     
  4. rick benjamin

    rick benjamin
    USA, Or, Damascus
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    Might have been store policy, salesman's experience, etc.
     
  5. Lindy

    Lindy
    Central Ca.
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    On weopons without a firing pin stop, the firing pin would slam forward onto an empty chamber as the slide moves into battery. possibly
    causeing damage to the firing pin hole. That old soldier is right.

    Good Shooting

    Lindy
     
  6. samuelm16

    samuelm16
    se pdx
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    Probably the same grouch that made me feel like a small child when i did the same thing on a sig 250, my theory is he is a power tripper
     
  7. Sstrand

    Sstrand
    La Grande OR
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    As long as the gun still belongs to them it is best to play by their rules.

    Sheldon
     
  8. stmcelroy

    stmcelroy
    Madras, OR
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    Might not hurt it, but I prefer to not do it without a snap cap at the least.
     
  9. Jabba

    Jabba
    Oregon
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    So if there is a round in the chamber, the firing pin is going to slam into the primer simply by releasing the slide?
     
  10. Koda

    Koda
    Oregon
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    The reason I have heard is that dropping the slide with the slide release wears out the slide stop notch in the slide over time rounding the square corner.
     
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  11. Nickb

    Nickb
    Moxee
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    I have seen signs at sportsmans that ask not to drop the slides on pistols. Like idahoen said it's not good on a 1911, the sear can bounce and ruin a trigger job.
     
  12. clearconscience

    clearconscience
    Vancouver, WA
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    If that's the sportsmans off from 82nd i think i had a similar experience of being told i was doing something wrong by the old marine behind the counter.
    Nice guy and I wanted to show him the respect a military vet deserves.

    I always drop my slide never had an issue. I'm not a 1911 guy though.
     
  13. clearconscience

    clearconscience
    Vancouver, WA
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    Especially any where your a guest. I usually adhere to what they want unless someone is being unsafe.
     
  14. Phillyfan

    Phillyfan
    Oregon City, Oregon
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    OK, so all I am really worried about is whether or not I am causing harm to my XDm's or Glocks by doing this at home. I have no problem with doing it the way they want in the store, it's their gun. I just didn't know if I was causing damage to my own guns by doing this. Doesn't sound like it. Thanks guys.
     
  15. Velzey

    Velzey
    Estacada Gunsmith
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    It won't break anything! Brand new guns, they are just being over protective I think.
     
  16. Koda

    Koda
    Oregon
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    Maybe reference your owners manual on that. There are two schools of though on that little lever. Some call it a slide stop, others call it a slide release. Pick one and act accordingly.

    FWIW, the youtube vidoes I've seen from professional instructors on various topics I've never seen one release the slide with the lever. Clint Smith has a good argument for this in this vid: Loading from empty - YouTube
     
  17. Pepe-lepew

    Pepe-lepew
    Mid Valley
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    99.9% of guns owners will never shoot their gun enough to wear it out. So, for most they will never know if it beats a gun up or not.

    The hardest the slide will hammer the frame is when you drop it on an empty chamber. I like to take care of my pistols and see no purpose to do that. I ride the slide home on empty chambers.
     
  18. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf
    SE Portland
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    I like to close the cylinder on a revolver by spinning the bejaysus out of the cylinder while simultaneously slamming it closed with all my might.. that Hollywood flipping it closed is for punks.

    gun-cocking-fail.gif
     
  19. roknHS

    roknHS
    Idaho
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    I experimented with the "let it slam home" on an empty chamber and the "ease it home" gently method when I first got my semi-auto handgun. Only took a couple of trials to decide it would be in the long term interest of all involved; me, my pocket book and the handgun, to let the slide ahead gently on the empty chamber when practicing. I mean why not.................seems to me the "let it slam home" method is like rocking your kid to sleep with real rocks.
     
  20. 2Wheels4Ever

    2Wheels4Ever
    Central Oregon
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    Most .22lr guns can be dry fired without hurting anything. I have dry fired my ruger mk II tens of thousands of times, and it still works the same as it did brand new. There is no wear on the firing pin, and no wear on the chamber face. I have also dry fired my savage mk II a decent amount and there is no wear. Modern .22lr guns are ok to dry fire. Older guns are not built the same way, and I suppose old habits die hard.
     

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