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When will we see irrefutable evidence of man made climate change, that even a common man can not cast doubt on?
 
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Thanks @arakboss, we are on Pacific Power and have enjoyed far lower rates than those on PGE. We used to live near Salem and had a avg monthly bill near $175 with almost all gas appliances. Now we are in Linn County with almost all electric appliances, including a well and our avg monthly bill is around $140. Dang, the secret got out, LOL.
 
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Thanks @arakboss, we are on Pacific Power and have enjoyed far lower rates than those on PGE. We used to live near Salem and had a avg monthly bill near $175 with almost all gas appliances. Now we are in Linn County with almost all electric appliances, including a well and our avg monthly bill is around $140. Dang, the secret got out, LOL.
Don't worry I am sure PGE has some rate hike requests up their sleeves.
 
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It will get really interesting when trucks are forced to be electric. High rate chargers for a truck take insane amounts of power. No way solar and wind will cover it, with the current technology.
Charging vehicles is mostly off-peak demand. There's a lot of capacity at 1AM when it's parked in your garage, not so much capacity at 1PM when you're at work.
 
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Charging vehicles is mostly off-peak demand. There's a lot of capacity at 1AM when it's parked in your garage, not so much capacity at 1PM when you're at work.
I believe @aflineman was referring to truck trucks ("real" trucks), not pickups - e.g., a Class 8 semi or truck, or other commercial use trucks, which are used constantly throughout the day, and could possibly require more frequent recharging as they will not be sitting still during the day (or night for that matter).
 
Charging vehicles is mostly off-peak demand. There's a lot of capacity at 1AM when it's parked in your garage, not so much capacity at 1PM when you're at work.
Commercial Semi trucks. Not your garden variety pick-up. I don't plan on charging a Semi in my garage at night. Fast charge semis and busses are in the multi MEGAwatt (million watts). Entire homes are in the 25,000 watt range (and most of that is unused).
 
I find it very interesting how so many day to day folks know nothing but what the press tells them about the realities of the powergrid, electric cars, green energy, and all that. About how all of the load from charging is at night (when the sun does not shine), so the impact on the grid is negligible. How wind is not tearing up the other units on the grid (which used to run as base load, and are now being torn up as they operate as peaking units). Not to mention VAR control for other green energy generation. I have been in this business in one form or another for 40 years. I have seen so many changes come and go. And, I hate to say it, you ain't seen nothing yet. Hang on and enjoy the ride. The energy sector is in for a very rough go around. You thought the California brown outs (and blackouts) could not happen here, think again. Oregon and Washington have screwed their part of the grid up so bad with all of these green technologies, it ain't funny. Coal and Nuke gone. And now Natural Gas electricity generation (and other uses) is a target. Hydro is not considered green (they will breach a dam any chance they get). I guess folks get what they vote for (and, yes this is mainly the fault of the majority party policies).
 
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Here's an aerial of a lithium mine in Chile's atacama salt flat region.

Looking super green , very eco conscious.

3500.jpg
 
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I find it very interesting how so many day to day folks know nothing but what the press tells them about the realities of the powergrid, electric cars, green energy, and all that. About how all of the load from charging is at night (when the sun does not shine), so the impact on the grid is negligible. How wind is not tearing up the other units on the grid (which used to run as base load, and are now being torn up as they operate as peaking units). Not to mention VAR control for other green energy generation. I have been in this business in one form or another for 40 years. I have seen so many changes come and go. And, I hate to say it, you ain't seen nothing yet. Hang on and enjoy the ride. The energy sector is in for a very rough go around. You thought the California brown outs (and blackouts) could not happen here, think again. Oregon and Washington have screwed their part of the grid up so bad with all of these green technologies, it ain't funny. Coal and Nuke gone. And now Natural Gas electricity generation (and other uses) is a target. Hydro is not considered green (they will breach a dam any chance they get). I guess folks get what they vote for (and, yes this is mainly the fault of the majority party policies).
1) We haven't had nuclear plants (except for Hanford, which leaks into the Columbia) in the PNW for decades and even then they didn't work.

2) The main source of PNW hydro power is the Columbia river dams, which the BPA & Corps of Engineers work on continuously. I can't speak to the grid, but those dams are not going anywhere.

3) The "green" part of power generation is working on ways to store the power when the wind isn't blowing and the sun isn't shining. Peak loads are still during the days - we shall see how charging EVs work out - but where I used to work there were charging stations in the parking lot - not that many, but some - I imagine there will be more. One office used power from a megawatt+ solar grid they had installed on the roofs of the parking garages, which also powered the offices.

4) I plan to install a solar array and battery bank when I build - enough to power everything I need electricity for. I will use the existing utility grid as a primary electricity source as it is so cheap here (so far - half the average US cost), but the winter of 2020 I had 8 power outages, one lasted 3-4 days, this winter I had a few more and so far this calendar year I had three outages - one this week. I am not counting on the public grid to keep my lights on and food refrigerated.

I have said it before, but the world is getting to a point where the number of humans and their impact on the earth is such that we are exceeding its carrying capacity. In the decades to come, being individually self sufficient with regards to shelter, energy, food, water and security will be a very valuable advantage - quite possibly necessary for survival.
 
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In all honesty the NW transmission "grid" is in moderate shape and always expanding and improving but the expansion of the grid is incredibly expensive and time consuming. One of the things sucking up tremendous amounts of power and the cause of expansion are data centers. BPA has a tremendous amount of work scheduled in the next 10 years to the tune of 3 billion+ dollars just for the company I work for. That total is not inclusive of all the other work planned by BPA for other contractors.
 

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