Earthquake realistic preps and situations?

Bob D

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Bought a Lifestraw Mission 12L water purifier, not filter. You will need a purifier following a disaster because every water source will be contaminated with human waste following a large-scale disaster and the absence of a sanitary sewer system.
As a pile-on to this comment for everyone else: the main reason for this is that filters can not reliably remove viruses from water. If you're up in the woods or working from rainwater, that's fine... if you're working with grey water or worse, a filter will result in a nice crystal clear hepatitis cocktail with a twist of norovirus.

You can get by with filtration only if you know the quality of your source water is at least decent.
 
OP
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My preps for a Cascadia SZ event are similar to those above in addition to those below. For context, I live in a suburban subdivision near the rural interface in a place subject to significant flooding if the upriver dams break due to the seismic event, which I expect. My house will be dry, but the elevated neighborhood will draw countless refugees, some from a nearby trailer park.
  • Noted the closest high ground near work so that I can use that as a temporary retreat while any flood waters recede
  • Converted my natural gas fireplace insert to propane, and keep 100 lb. and 40 lb. cylinders onsite. Have plan to thermally isolate downstairs from upstairs
  • Bought large roll of translucent HD plastic sheeting, 4 rolls of premium duct tape, and thermally reflective bubble wrap to cover windows that may break during the event. Keep extra staples for the staple gun
  • Bought an Acopower 120W solar charger to keep the battery running my inverter charged. Inverter is reserved to run minimal LED lighting and the fireplace fan
  • Added aquatic antibiotics to my med kit
  • Discovered a handful of like-minded neighbors within a 5-minute walk of my house who are on board
  • Noted where the four LEOs who live within a 5-minute walk of my house live
  • Strengthened my fence gates on the sides of my house, and modified the hardware so I can easily alternate between allowing and excluding operation of the hardware from the front
  • Traded my wheelbarrow for a 2-wheeled yard cart which can be more easily used to transport 5-gallon buckets of water. Bought casters which can be added to the stand portion of the cart and make it into a 4-wheeled cart
  • Noted the rural homes just outside the neighborhood, many of which are likely still on wells. Plan to knock on doors and offer my generator, or fuel, in exchange for water from their well. I'm an electrician, and can help wire their well to run on generator power if needed.
  • Bought a fuel siphon designed for newer vehicles with the filler hose safety device, and never let my vehicles get below 1/2 tank
  • Bought a Lifestraw Mission 12L water purifier, not filter. You will need a purifier following a disaster because every water source will be contaminated with human waste following a large-scale disaster and the absence of a sanitary sewer system. Boiling requires too much fuel which needs to be reserved for cooking
  • Carry a get-home bag in my truck with a sleeping pad and inflatable PFD (life jacket). I work on the other side of the river, and the pad can be used to float my pack across while I wear the PFD to keep from dying. I also keep a map in the pack with all pedestrian, railway, and vehicle bridges highlighted
  • Established contacts in the medical field should my family or I need emergency care while it is otherwise unavailable
  • Verified the shortest route home on foot which is different than the route I drive each day
  • Keep myself physically fit. At 50, I'm doomed if I don't!
  • Since my wife has no interest in learning how to use my dual-band ham radios, I took a photo of the radio and marked it up with notes on controls, and added post-disaster instructions so I can hopefully reach her afterward
  • Prepared minimal emergency travel kits for each member of the family to take if they travel more than 30 minutes from home
One thing I still want to cover is a laundry wringer for washing clothes by hand. Hope this helps you all prepare!

So you're not really a Defense Minister?:D
 
OP
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As a pile-on to this comment for everyone else: the main reason for this is that filters can not reliably remove viruses from water. If you're up in the woods or working from rainwater, that's fine... if you're working with grey water or worse, a filter will result in a nice crystal clear hepatitis cocktail with a twist of norovirus.

You can get by with filtration only if you know the quality of your source water is at least decent.

Boiling filtered water could be a second measure after filtration. I piss in the water source so that you guys are used to drinking contaminated water and have built up a tolerance. You can thank me later. :s0121:
 

XoXSciFiGuy

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When working up a survival plan, or a system where you can Shelter in Place (or nearby, like your back yard) you have to get a certain mindset.

"How I can have *almost* everything available that I have NOW...even after all the lights, the internet, the phones go out, and no store to visit?"

After a natural disaster like a major earthquake, most people will not be thinking of just picking up a gun and going out to steal what they can. They will mostly be afraid, especially if they have families. Only the folks who were actually criminals at the time of the earthquake will go that route. Most of the people you meet at such a time will simply be frightened, and wanting information on what is being done, and what they should do.

This is why keeping your communications facility open and working, no matter what method you use, is so important. For the first few days, the most valuable quantity will not be food or water. It will be INFORMATION.
 
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After a natural disaster like a major earthquake, most people will not be thinking of just picking up a gun and going out to steal what they can. They will mostly be afraid, especially if they have families. Only the folks who were actually criminals at the time of the earthquake will go that route. Most of the people you meet at such a time will simply be frightened, and wanting information on what is being done, and what they should do.
This is true up to the point that 72 hours has passed since their last meal, and that of their kids, especially when they have no idea when, or from where, that next meal will come. That is when things will get very, very interesting...

This is the reason I plan to get headed home immediately following an event if I am away as it will get exponentially worse as time passes if aid isn’t available, and there is no order or LE response.
 

The Heretic

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This is true up to the point that 72 hours has passed since their last meal, and that of their kids, especially when they have no idea when, or from where, that next meal will come. That is when things will get very, very interesting...

This is the reason I plan to get headed home immediately following an event if I am away as it will get exponentially worse as time passes if aid isn’t available, and there is no order or LE response.
Having gone 72 hours without food (beyond clear liquids), I was not near as hungry as I thought I would be. As long as I kept my electrolytes up, I was more or less ok and it was interesting to note. I was not active - more or less sedentary (I worked a desk job). After the initial noting of being hungry and wanting something to eat, I just more or less ignored it and then didn't really notice any real hunger pangs. I did have cravings, but that is quite different - I have cravings all the time, whether I have a full stomach or not.

That is not to say that some people who have never been hungry won't complain, and those who are active, won't notice it more. Then there are those who will need to eat - such as diabetics/etc.
 

albin25

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Got it covered.

Massive earthquake in Lewiston,
- 90 days meds, food, etc....use 1 days worth for practise, ask neighbors if they felt sumpthin"
or
Massive earthquake on West Coast, drops it into the Pacific:
- lots of beer in cooler, lawn chairs, cigars, BBQ steaks with neighbors, concerned looks.

:s0155: All set
 
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Having gone 72 hours without food (beyond clear liquids), I was not near as hungry as I thought I would be. As long as I kept my electrolytes up, I was more or less ok and it was interesting to note. I was not active - more or less sedentary (I worked a desk job). After the initial noting of being hungry and wanting something to eat, I just more or less ignored it and then didn't really notice any real hunger pangs. I did have cravings, but that is quite different - I have cravings all the time, whether I have a full stomach or not.

That is not to say that some people who have never been hungry won't complain, and those who are active, won't notice it more. Then there are those who will need to eat - such as diabetics/etc.
The first time I had to go without food, for 36 hours rather than 72, I was shocked to discover the same thing which is why I keep electrolyte tabs in my GHB. It's really the psychology of not having eaten, and having no idea when and where the next meal resides, that causes folks to snap
 
Having gone 72 hours without food (beyond clear liquids), I was not near as hungry as I thought I would be. As long as I kept my electrolytes up, I was more or less ok and it was interesting to note. I was not active - more or less sedentary (I worked a desk job). After the initial noting of being hungry and wanting something to eat, I just more or less ignored it and then didn't really notice any real hunger pangs. I did have cravings, but that is quite different - I have cravings all the time, whether I have a full stomach or not.

That is not to say that some people who have never been hungry won't complain, and those who are active, won't notice it more. Then there are those who will need to eat - such as diabetics/etc.
I've only gone 48 hours without food (by choice). The longest I have gone without food "not by choice" was about 30 hours. The "not by choice" time was during an especially high stress event coupled with high physical demands. It really sucked. I felt a constant nagging hunger, headache, felt weaker, and going back and forth between lethargy and anger.

But the interesting thing was that some people were able to still function while others folded like a cheap lawn chair. I think if I had to also deal with an upset wife and distraught young children who have gone 3 days without food and shelter, I would do desperate things. We don't know how people will behave under deep stress until it happens.

Oh, I also wanted to put a reminder for having a bunch of good fire extinguishers around the house. If there is a big earthquake, the water lines may be severed so no garden hose. It also might be a while before the fire department comes around. A few good fire extinguishers may save your home or at least buy you time to get everyone out and perhaps save some gear.
 
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I've only gone 48 hours without food (by choice). The longest I have gone without food "not by choice" was about 30 hours. The "not by choice" time was during an especially high stress event coupled with high physical demands. It really sucked. I felt a constant nagging hunger, headache, felt weaker, and going back and forth between lethargy and anger.

But the interesting thing was that some people were able to still function while others folded like a cheap lawn chair. I think if I had to also deal with an upset wife and distraught young children who have gone 3 days without food and shelter, I would do desperate things. We don't know how people will behave under deep stress until it happens.

Oh, I also wanted to put a reminder for having a bunch of good fire extinguishers around the house. If there is a big earthquake, the water lines may be severed so no garden hose. It also might be a while before the fire department comes around. A few good fire extinguishers may save your home or at least buy you time to get everyone out and perhaps save some gear.
Any insights from your 30 hour experience you can share?
 

The Heretic

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Well, I wasn't under stress during the 72 hours - it was just prep for a medical procedure - so I just went about my life, keeping in mind that if I didn't remember to not eat I would have to start all over again.

Before that, the longest I went was about 48 hours while on a SAR mission. That was stressful, and not eating was just a side effect - the main problem was sea sickness and exposure to the elements combined with sleep deprivation. By the end, the coxswain was in the hospital (ruptured the lining of his stomach from vomiting so much) and the rest of us were suffering from exposure and exhaustion (among other things), and basically slept for two days afterwards. So yeah - it depends on the situation. Eating was just not something we wanted to do while being so sick and not particularly a priority afterwards either.
 
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Everyone develops their own 'system' regarding a survival system in the event of a serious natural disaster or other big-time emergency. I will take some time and lay out for you what I have done over the last four years to prepare. I will try to explain the 'why' for each item, unless it's obvious. This stuff is in no particular order:

1) Handheld Baofeng ham transceiver, the three-level power model. (Will transmit 1 watt/4 watt/8 watt) Even though the FCC is saying now that the eight watt trans function is illegal, they aren't really enforcing that. What they DO enforce is whether you have an FCC ham license. So study for it and GET ONE. It's good for ten years and you get a call sign to boot. Even when all the cells and landlines are down, you can still reach other hams, listen to weather radio, ambulances, FEMA, the cops, and you can program all FMRS, MURS, and any other 2 meter and 70 centimeter channels into it. Upgrade the antenna and buy some higher capacity batteries for it as well.

2) Dual-fuel portable generator: It's easier and safer to store propane than it is to store straight gasoline for a generator. But you can STILL use gasoline if you want. Build a soundproofing box for it and you can cut the noise by at least half or more. Plenty of videos at YouTube on how it is done.

3) Second back-up power source: I use a dual method. One is a portable power station that will accept charging by all normal sources, including a solar panel. This setup is for the 'small stuff' like your smartphone, laptop, battery chargers, maybe one of those 7" flip-up TV/DVD players and the like. My larger source is a couple of large deep cycle batteries with a 750-watt AC inverter. You can also charge the deep cycles using the solar panel, or if you wish, the generator. But if you want to ensure you always have at least SOME power available no matter what...make sure you have some type of solar power available. A good 100-watt panel will do just fine for most situations.

4) An emergency radio that picks up Damn Near Everything: I have two of these. One is cheaper but works REALLY well and will do everything but the dishes. I gave it a five star rating at Amazon. The other is an older unit from the early 1980's I picked up at a garage sale. Picture of the old one below. Both are good.

View attachment 751223

5) I'm a big believer in Sheltering-in-Place if you can, but just in case... get yourself a really BIG tent. Tall, wide, and deep. The kind you can walk around in without stooping. I picked up a Coleman Montana from Amazon a couple of years ago with a seven-foot center height. It was one of those Amazon returns and I got it with free shipping for a measly 80 bucks. It's a LOT bigger than it appears in the picture. And a lot taller. 16 length/9 width/7 plus feet tall in center. Not Shown: Storm fly cover. The door has curved poles so you can open and close it like a regular door with the velcro stays.

View attachment 751224
6) FOOD: You can go all different ways on the food question, and everyone has their own ideas on what works and what doesn't. Basically, it comes down to Short Term and Long Term. Short term food are things like canned meats and veggies, or anything that will stay good for at least 18-24 months stored at normal temperatures. Long term food is restricted to freeze-dried or those big bucket food supply kits. You have to strike a balance here. Freeze-dried gets expensive. The buckets mostly taste like crap, but keep you alive. You can also do specialized food, such as long-term butter powder, sugar, dried fruits and the like. The good news is that short term food, if you stick mostly to cans for that, you can easily store 3-6 months worth of food that way. Use a black felt pen to mark the cans with their month and year of expiration. Canned foods with acid in them, like tomatoes, tomato sauce, or certain vegetables, usually expire in 18 months or less. Some products can go two years or more. Don't forget to toss in some pasta, rice, and the like. Sealed, they last quite a while. Sugar and honey, if they aren't opened, can last for years.

7) WATER: This simple item causes the biggest headaches. You can store all the water you wish in food-grade containers and add this chemical or that one. All the same, you will still have to dump it all out and replace it occasionally. So one absolute must-have device is a really good water filter, like the ones hikers use. There is ONE water source that if you store it in boxes away from sunlight, will last virtually forever, and you would never think of it. Pelligrino water, the kind sold in the glass bottles, will last for many many years if left unopened. The GLASS bottles. NOT THE PLASTIC ONES. I found this out on the US Food and Drug Admin website. Of course, you will have to deal with the CO2 fizz, but you can pour it out into a container and get rid of it in minutes. If you aren't familiar with Pelligrino, picture below.

View attachment 751225

8) Medical: You can build one that would fill a suitcase, or go with a decent First Aid Kit. Just make sure you add a good supply of the medications you use regularly, especially the over-the-counter stuff. Tums, the acid-reflux meds, whatever you take OTC for minor pain are the usuals.

There are other things of course, but those are my contributions to the subject.
Wondering which model of the radio you have. Thank you.
 

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