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Do you have an AR15--parts, a stripped lower, anything, and want to work with it?

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by Powderman, Dec 25, 2012.

  1. Powderman

    Powderman Washington State Member

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    For the folks here that have AR15's--or parts--I'll make this service.

    I am a Colt certified AR15 armorer. I can help you build your lower, upper, or do parts replacement and mods.

    Recent events (of which we are all aware) and the ensuing political climate have made lots of folks purchase AR15's and related items.

    For members of this forum, I will offer a service--I will help you with your AR15 pattern rifle. Please either post a message, which I will respond to--or post to the forum.

    The cost for this service?

    NOTHING.

    Yes, you have it right--zero, zilch, nada.

    So, let me know!
     
  2. motoman98

    motoman98 Gresham, OR Active Member

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    Where are you located?
     
  3. Powderman

    Powderman Washington State Member

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    Olympia/Lacey/Tacoma area. I'll answer any question that I can on the board, here...meeting up will be a bit problematic, because my schedule at work changes on an irregular basis. I can meet on a case-by-case basis in this general area, though...let me know.
     
  4. Powderman

    Powderman Washington State Member

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    The question that some are probably asking..."What is this guy about, and why is he offering services for free?"

    Here's the answer: In this day and age, I have found it quite rewarding to, as they say, "pay it forward". I like helping other folks out.

    Second reason--a few days ago, I posted a crappy response to a member of the board. This is a way--for me at least--to attempt to make up for it.

    And, I'm serious. I will help anyone here with any AR15 problems that they might have. Now, I don't claim to be the rifle guru--but I do have a LOT of experience--more than 30 years worth--with the M16 and the AR15 family.

    So, let me know, folks! To paraphrase a commercial up here: "Does your rifle not run? Drop in parts...don't? Give me a PM, or a post---I can help." :)
     
  5. edogg

    edogg Western Washington Active Member

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    I'll start...

    I just bought a Colt LE6920. Any break in or basic maintenance tips? I know how to field strip and disassemble the BCG but that's about it.

    Are there any parts that tend to wear or get lost that I should keep extras of? Are there any common mods that I should consider doing? I just put a Magpul STR stock on it.

    Thanks!
     
  6. PDXSparky

    PDXSparky Keizer / Hillsboro Well-Known Member

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    Another reason is that putting together an AR is simply a fun activity for some people.
     
  7. Powderman

    Powderman Washington State Member

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    First, the LE6920 is a great platform just the way it is. You probably notice that the trigger feels kinda rough and heavy. Don't worry--it will smooth out with use.
    Next, it always helps to keep a few parts on hand--not because they wear out quickly, but because they tend to get kinda lost when you have it apart for cleaning.

    The parts I would keep on hand would be a spare firing pin, at least two or three firing pin retaining pins (the one that looks like a glorified cotter pin), some extractor springs and inserts (make sure that they are the BLACK inserts; they are the current OEM for Colt rifles--and most other AR15's I have seen), and perhaps a spare set of hammer and trigger pins. NOTE: Measure the pins first. The newer manufactured Colt rifles have 0.155 pins; however, some of the older ones that you find will have 0.172 pins. Get the proper ones.

    I would not worry about break-in. However, to maximize the accuracy potential of the carbine, you'll want to make sure you have proper cleaning equipment. I prefer and use Dewey one-piece rods--they actually make an AR specific chamber cleaning kit, with a solid non-swiveling rod and a GI chamber brush. (Invest in some of those chamber brushes, too!)

    For patches, head to Brownell's website. Look for the GI cleaning patches. There are two sizes to be had--.30 caliber patches, and .223 caliber patches--the small ones. Also--get and use a bore guide! This keeps the rod centered in the bore. Another accessory to consider is a cleaning link--this holds the carbine hinged open while in a rest.

    Something else--and your wife/husband/significant other will thank you for it--is a muzzle covering patch and solvent catcher. There are some out there known as a "Patch Hog"; they fit over the muzzle and catch all the spray and dirty patches that you push through the bore for easy disposal. Trust me--carbon-laden solvent dripping onto a carpet is NOT a good thing. (Don't ask me how I know....)

    For cleaning solvent, there are tons of good ones out there--but I simply use Hoppe's #9, the old standby.

    If you want to do a break in, that's fine--remember that your rifle has a chrome lined chamber and bore, so it will stay serviceable and accurate for a long long time. I'd fire and completly clean for about five, five round cycles.

    Now, I tend to baby my rifles--I never shoot my carbine enough to make it REALLY hot. I'll go through a magazine, then let it cool.

    Here are a few tips for keeping the rifle running: Keep that BCG clean! Right in the bottom where the bolt goes, carbon will accumulate. It can be removed with a toothbrush end and a patch soaked in solvent. Same goes for the bolt "tail"--keep it clean down to the metal. Carbon builds up there very quickly, and can cause stoppages.

    Keep your chamber clean, as well. Here's a tip--but do it in the garage or outside: Clean the chamber with the chamber brush and plenty of solvent. When done, take compressed air to it--make sure it's away from your face, because the first blast will blow all kinds of solvent and garbage out of the chamber!

    Most importantly, remember this: AR's like to be run wet. Use a good oil--I use and recommend Kano Microil, available from Kano Laboratories, online. This stuff is great--it is a purified instrument oil. You can also mix it with Kroil, in a 3:1 ratio. The Kroil will penetrate and displace moisture, while the Microil will provide lasting lubrication. Put a heavy coat on the bolt body, and the outside of the bolt carrier. Don't forget a few drops on the locking lugs, as well. (Tip: I use a small paintbrush with a few drops at a time of Microil, and brush it on. You can use the brush to even up the coat, as well.)

    And, if you want to, you can make your rifle distinctive: I used a gold paint stick to fill in the letters on the side of the receiver. Apply it to a dry receiver, and wipe the excess off with mineral oil. It looks purty!

    Hope this helps...if there is anything else, post it, and I'll help as best as I can.
     
    edogg and (deleted member) like this.
  8. Powderman

    Powderman Washington State Member

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    Absolutely true! During my first Armorer's class, our instructor was fond of having us completely disassemble the rifle--and I mean COMPLETELY. All the small parts went into a cup--and you would be surprised at how many small parts are lurking in that rifle. Then, we would dump it out, mix it up--and put the whole thing back together again!!!
     
  9. mgavatar

    mgavatar Vancouver, WA Member

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    Thanks Powderman for your suggestions, here is a question: can something be done about the loud "TWANG" of the buffer spring? The noise after few rounds, even with very good ear protection is very annoying, any solution?
    Thanks
     
  10. eldbillbo

    eldbillbo clackamas New world samurai and a redneck none the less Bronze Supporter

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    A AK47 :thumbup:

    A tungsten powder buffer helps a little as far as making a little quieter
    so does white lithium grease in the buffer tube as far as making a little quieter and is cheaper than the other solutions.
    and a hydrolic buffer seems a little quieter as far as making a little quieter
    but none of the above get rid of it they still twang like a old country western song

    but this does the trick .
    JP Custom Buffer Springs and Silent Captured Springs they are expensive
    JP - Buffer Springs and Silent Captured Springs

    even Kurts has/had them

    after shooting the ar15 for nearly 15 years now i got to where i like country western twang music
     
    mgavatar and (deleted member) like this.
  11. iamme

    iamme Lane County Well-Known Member

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    After seeing how much JP asked for "quiet springs" I got over the noise! Lol
     
  12. edogg

    edogg Western Washington Active Member

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    Thanks for the tips, Powderman!

    When it comes to the oil, I always use either Break Free or M-Pro 7 CLP lube on my guns. Will this do the trick on the BCG?

    Silly question...what are the locking lugs?
     
  13. Powderman

    Powderman Washington State Member

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    Break Free and M-Pro7 are both good products. There are many good lubricants out there, and the type you use is up to you. The trick is to keep the rifle as clean as possible and well lubed.

    If you look at the bolt itself, you'll see the squares of metal arranged in a star pattern around the bolt face. Those are the locking lugs, and when the bolt rotates when it seats into full engagement, they rotate in the barrel extension behind corresponding metal surfaces, thus locking the bolt into position for firing. These bolt lugs and the engagement surfaces are what is containing the pressure generated upon firing--along with the rest of the chamber.
     
  14. eldbillbo

    eldbillbo clackamas New world samurai and a redneck none the less Bronze Supporter

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    Locking lugs are the lugs inside your barrel extension that the bolt lugs go in between and into the extension then the bolt twist thus locking it in into the barrel extension while chambering a round
     
  15. Powderman

    Powderman Washington State Member

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    I would advise against using a buffer with powder inside. If you do decide to use a heavy buffer, make sure it has weights.

    Why?

    When the bolt seats home, if actually has a tendency to bounce--which is a natural reaction to hard surfaces hitting each other. The weights in the buffer are actually to the rear of the buffer as it starts forward under the power of the action spring. A split second after the bolt hits home, the weights in the buffer impact the front--which gives it an additional tap to re-seat the bolt into full engagement. A buffer with powder inside has a softer impact, and in extreme cases might not seat the bolt fully.
     
  16. Powderman

    Powderman Washington State Member

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    I would advise against using a buffer with powder inside. If you do decide to use a heavy buffer, make sure it has weights.

    Why?

    When the bolt seats home, if actually has a tendency to bounce--which is a natural reaction to hard surfaces hitting each other. The weights in the buffer are actually to the rear of the buffer as it starts forward under the power of the action spring. A split second after the bolt hits home, the weights in the buffer impact the front--which gives it an additional tap to re-seat the bolt into full engagement. A buffer with powder inside has a softer impact, and in extreme cases might not seat the bolt fully.

    The other ideas here have plenty of merit--but I'm afraid that you're stuck with that twang--at least until the inside of the tube and the spring are burnished a bit through continued operation.
     
  17. edogg

    edogg Western Washington Active Member

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    I had a feeling that's what they were. Thanks to both of you for confirming!

    Hopefully I'll get some quality time with the rifle this weekend to do an initial clean and lube.

    Sent from my PM23300 using Board Express
     
  18. eldbillbo

    eldbillbo clackamas New world samurai and a redneck none the less Bronze Supporter

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    I have used the Spikes T3 tungsten powder filed buffer and it does what i claims
    but you are correct and if someone is running a under gassed system it will cause problems

    but here is the quote from spikes and many have used it and are pleased. I used the T2 which is heavier than a H buffer with my PWS piston upper although it made it made the muzzle climb about non existent when i got to my 3rd 30 rd mag i did have some FTF which i never have had with that upper using a standard H buffer. Now in a DI system it runs as smooth as butter. when i installed the PWS i did not open the gas port like some do though i wanted to adjust it from the other end and not over gas it like some do with some piston systems but the PWS Piston has a sharp recoil vs a DI . Its not bad but i wanted to see what the T2 would do in in.

    here is spikes quote

    "Each ST-T2 buffer is filled with HDTP which is short for "High Density Tungsten Powder" and topped off with a Mil-Spec bumper. Because of this, there aren’t any reciprocating weights inside to make a lot of noise and it also makes for a very smooth cycling rifle. The ST-T2 eliminates the chance of bolt bounce, helps with muzzle rise when firing in full-auto, and cuts down on felt recoil. As you can tell, it's a HUGE upgrade from a Standard Carbine buffer! It's designed for .223/5.56 but it works in all Calibers! "

    By no means am i saying any one needs this, but it does reduce muzzle climb and it is a little quieter but the down fall is that if using cheap low power ammo or if you under gassed it may cause FTF issues.
     
  19. Powderman

    Powderman Washington State Member

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    Agreed.

    One thing I'll make clear about myself--I have ZERO experience with piston driven AR platforms. I have heard good things about them, and bad things as well--unfortunately, I have no practical experience with that system.

    Another observation--I have no experience with Spike's buffers--but I wonder if they are heavier than the T3, which has three separate tungsten weights in it.
     
  20. edogg

    edogg Western Washington Active Member

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    Is there a particular spare parts kit you'd recommend? And any particular shop? I just poked around on Midway and Brownell's website and the options were staggering and a lot were out of stock.

    I also picked up a Leupold Mark AR scope and these Leupold QRW rings. I'm wondering if I should return the rings and get a mounting system like the Integrated Mounting System instead. The gun shop where I bought the rifle and scope only had 1 mounting system like the IMS and it was pretty expensive - $200. Vs. $65 for the rings. I assume that the advantage of the IMS is that I can take it off and put it on without losing the zero, right?