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Do you use the slide stop as a slilde release or overhand method?


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Ura-Ki

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I was taught to Insert a charged mag and then overhand the slide ONLY when initially charging the pistol and preforming a press check. After shooting, and depending if I ran the entire mag or did a "tactical reload", would determine which method I used to drop the slide! If shooting through a mag and then charging with a freshy, it is always the over hand slide release followed by the press check, if doing a T.R. then it's the slide stop method and no press check! I have always found this to be the fastest and easiest to do, especially under stress, and it doesn't matter which pistol I am shooting, nor does it really wear on parts as long as your only doing it on a charged mag, NEVER on an empty chamber/mag removed! I have a few 1911s that have thousands of rounds through them using the above charging methods and there is no real wear to be found, at least no accelerated wear, same situation with my beloved M-92 and IWI 941 series!
 
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Until I read this I always thought the slide stop was also intended as the release. If it wasn't supposed to be used for that then why make it a button or lever when you could easily design a mechanism that didn't protrude?

Generally speaking I don't use it and use the slide. This also has me thinking about my AR's since I do use the stop on those as a release where I could use the charging handle.
This is a good question and I can only guess: that they were originally designed as both but it was some of the bigger defensive firearms training curriculum that discovered it was better to not use the slide stop as a release for tactical reason, as a decision independent from manufacturer designs.

As far as the AR Im not trained on using it tactically but Id rather use the slide stop because to release slide lock the charging handle is loose pulling it back and just seems weird that way but Im open to hear what reputable training instructs...
 
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While I do occasionally use the slide stop as a slide release, I was trained to use the overhand method because it is basically the same physical movements you would use to clear a jam/stoppage (think Tap-Rack-Bang drill) and by using the overhand method you are teaching yourself muscle memory that can come in handy in a stressful situation.
 
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While I do occasionally use the slide stop as a slide release, I was trained to use the overhand method because it is basically the same physical movements you would use to clear a jam/stoppage (think Tap-Rack-Bang drill) and by using the overhand method you are teaching yourself muscle memory that can come in handy in a stressful situation.
Every now and then someone will say something that has you going "well damn". I have been shooting for almost 6 decades and never heard it put like this before. It makes total sense. So much so I can't believe I never heard it before. Probably a little late to try to re train now but I am going to make a point of using the off hand for just this reason now.
 
Unlike my Glak, the slide on my CZ P10c is very difficult if not impossible to let loose using the side release. My wife just uses the Deltapoint on her P09 to rack/release the slide. I never knew this issue was a thing tho.
 
Ummm... No.
( mostly )
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But at times ...Yes
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Andy
 

bbbass

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IMO it hardly matters which technique is used.

1. In finely tuned guns used in competition, the slide release method is faster. (IMO that technique wearing out parts is a myth... and what competition shooter isn't already swapping out parts anyway? ;))

The tactical instructors want you to use the overhand method because fine motor skills can be impacted during a gun fight, and because pulling the slide back adds some zest to the spring load and prevents a weak slide return... supposedly. But my hands are no longer strong enough to do the overhand quickly and many shooters will be placing their palm over the ejection port in order to get a workable grip on the slide... not a good idea.

However:

2. In today's world of 17,18, and 20rd mags in fully semi-auto pistols, reloads during civilian gunfights are very very rare. (Most civilian gunfights are said to be 1-3rds.) Realistic training of civies therefore should have much less focus on mag changes, and more on malfunction clearing, esp one handed.
 
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I usually don’t use slide stop as a release but do occasionally on glocks without too many worries. A fine 1911 is another matter. When dry that is.

There's the key! If the gun has a loaded magazine I use the slide release, as riding the slide forward can result in a failure to feed. But if it's empty I never let the slide slam closed, and always help it gently close.
 

Mikej

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But if it's empty I never let the slide slam closed, and always help it gently close.
But it looks so cool, and gives you operator points!. Also, rocking that cylinder closed on your revolver with the flick of the wrist. Yeah!

NO.

I use the slide release to chamber a round from a fresh mag. First mag is inserted with slide in battery and chambered by hand. My semi-auto carry guns aren't easy to do that so I don't with those.
 
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I'm not opposed to using the slide stop as a release. It's your gun, use it however you wish. If it wears out, the gun is still functional.

However, I personally enjoy pulling and releasing the slide like a sling shot or bow and arrow. It's just more fun and I'm not wearing parts out in the process.
Have you ever seen or heard of a slide stop wearing out? I’ve not. Not trying to argue I’m just curious if this happens or just “could happen”. I could see maybe in regular competition use but not likely on a range or SD gun.

Some manufacturers call it a slide release. I can only imagine there intention was to use it to close the slide. Others call it a slide catch or stop and I figure those are meant to hold the slide open and for us to pull the slide to release.

I use different techniques for different guns.
 

2Wheels4Ever

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Have you ever seen or heard of a slide stop wearing out? I’ve not. Not trying to argue I’m just curious if this happens or just “could happen”. I could see maybe in regular competition use but not likely on a range or SD gun.

Some manufacturers call it a slide release. I can only imagine there intention was to use it to close the slide. Others call it a slide catch or stop and I figure those are meant to hold the slide open and for us to pull the slide to release.

I use different techniques for different guns.
Yeah, a guy I used to shoot USPSA with had a Glock that would no longer lock back on an empty mag. G17 if I remember correctly.
 
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Have you ever seen or heard of a slide stop wearing out? I’ve not. Not trying to argue I’m just curious if this happens or just “could happen”. I could see maybe in regular competition use but not likely on a range or SD gun.

Some manufacturers call it a slide release. I can only imagine there intention was to use it to close the slide. Others call it a slide catch or stop and I figure those are meant to hold the slide open and for us to pull the slide to release.

I use different techniques for different guns.
This is why I look at, if I stud up enough to wear out a slide release I'll happily replace it and continue on, same goes for barrels, extractors, you name it. Wear is part of the game, only those playing it will experience it and no one I know cries about it.
 
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hopefully they make the slide stop lever a softer material than the notch in the slide....
 

Nosferatu

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After the thread I started a bit ago about my suppressed G29, some tried to sell me on an extended slide stop and a new technique of dropping the slide. I stubbornly stuck to my ways.

Today I decided today to take out a few of my handguns and try to manipulate the slide stop on a fresh mag change. I even took out the most elderly pistol in my current "collection", a Sig P220 Carry SAO. This is the gun with the most rounds down it. The others are my daily carry gun, a Sig 365 and the big boy of the house, Springfield XD-M 5.25 10mm.

I have medium palms and short fingers. I've also broken every finger at some point in my life, some of them twice, so my hands may be somewhat of an anomaly.

I can't reliably operate the slide stop to chamber a round in any of them. The 220 is 100% impossible for me. I don't have the leverage to get it to move.

The XD and 365 are doable, but require me to move the gun in my hand to do so. I find it easier and quicker to overhand it.

FWIW, I also swap the mag release to the right side of the gun (ala lefty) so I can operate it with my trigger finger. I get better leverage and faster actuation than having to shift the gun in my hand if I were to do it with my stubby, useless thumbs.
 
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I have medium palms and short fingers. I've also broken every finger at some point in my life, some of them twice, so my hands may be somewhat of an anomaly.

I can't reliably operate the slide stop to chamber a round in any of them. The 220 is 100% impossible for me. I don't have the leverage to get it to move.

The XD and 365 are doable, but require me to move the gun in my hand to do so. I find it easier and quicker to overhand it.
and that is the reason for professionals teaching only the overhand technique. One technique that works for all guns and situations.
 
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