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de-boning in the field

Discussion in 'Northwest Hunting' started by barbd5, Oct 26, 2011.

  1. barbd5

    barbd5 Salem New Member

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    Just had to de-bone in the field for the first time and it got a little messy. Anyone know of a video or resource to improve my skills.
     
  2. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    Last year was my first year of dedicating myself to killin' a deer. I talked to some about where to take it for butchering and got bad reviews on most buthers (putting all the meat together for sausage and giving you the correct weight of yours and others venison)

    Anyway I went to You Tube and found Roe deer butchering.If the guy isn't a tech school teacher,he should be.
    Goes thruogh the whole process over 4 videos.Easy to follow and informative.
    You can watch the first two and then he goes to cutting the meat up.

    And mostly it's follow the bones and the muscle groups

    Maybe try to find someone that butcher's their own deer and watch?

    Hey good luck!
     
  3. cyclesurvival

    cyclesurvival Vancouver Well-Known Member

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    I do all my own, it doesnt take much skill and will save you dollars and meat. In the butcher shop they dont always give you back your meat. If the leave the bone in its just good for dog food. I grind my own hamburger and add beef suiet to it for fat content. Had a butcher do my burger and added pork fat gave that hamburger to the dogs also. Bone it out slice it up package it in the right size for your needs, wrap with ceran wrap and butcher paper make sure to date it! label it! and try to be as clean and neet as you can. Good luck its not rocket sience.
     
  4. rexndodge

    rexndodge Oregon City New Member

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    I think he is looking for advice on de-boning in the field. I had a guy show this to me on a elk hunt years ago and I've done this every since. Most efficient way to pack your meat out. No sense lugging out all the stuff you'll throw away. The comment from another reply is the best advice, "follow the bones and muscle groups". I always tell people to think of rolling the meat off the bone. Just be sure to keep the hair off the meat as you go. The hide makes a perfect clean area to do you work. Don't worry, you'll get more efficient at it. Keep Hunting...
     
  5. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    Oh and take a LITTLE filet knife with you (and on of those filet gloves,you will cut yourself when learning)
    The little ones are easier to handle than a bigger hunting knife
     
  6. rexndodge

    rexndodge Oregon City New Member

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    Good advice. A good 6 inch lock blade or skinning knife (X2) is all I ever carry...and a stone. The hair dulls your knives really fast. The good quality knife will have a thicker blade. You may end up splitting a breast plate (elk) by whacking that sucker with a rock. Don't bother with the heavy hatchet...think "pack light", carry more meat out.
     
  7. Onajoyride

    Onajoyride Tigard Member

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    I just gut mine in the field and debone in the garage or back at camp too messy and I hate getting attacked by the yellow jackets.
     
  8. 2506

    2506 Seattle Well-Known Member

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  9. barbd5

    barbd5 Salem New Member

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    This is the information I am looking for! I have hunted for years and with horses have always been able to bring the animals out whole or close to it. Now without the horses and hunting in the back country it would be nearly impossible to bring the animal out whole. So looking for good information on de-boning in the field. Thanks for the info.
     
  10. Silverback

    Silverback Oregon City New Member

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    We bone out all our Elk and Deer in the field. We lay them on one side. Skin out the side thats up and lay the skin hair side down on the ground. Cut the quarters off as you normally would. Lay the quarters on a clean game bag and cut all the meat from it. Basically followiing the major muscle seams. Then remove the backstrap and all the trim meat from the 1/2 thats up. Then roll it back over the skin to put the other side up and repeat. No need to gut them you can slip in just below the back bone from the side to get the tenderloin. And if you like the liver and heart you can do the same thing make a cut or two to the cavity and reach in and get what you want while leaving the rest in tact for the yotes,bears,birds !!
     
  11. PlayboyPenguin

    PlayboyPenguin Pacific Northwest Well-Known Member 2016 Volunteer

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    I only "debone" at home. Of course I have not been "deboning" as often as I like since the kids came...and especially not since my laptop died last week.
     
  12. samuelm16

    samuelm16 se pdx Well-Known Member

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    rim shot badamp cha
     
  13. Sling Blade

    Sling Blade Yamhill County Well-Known Member

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  14. MinnesotaORnewbie

    MinnesotaORnewbie Oregon Active Member

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    I would think of it in quarters. follow the front shoulders around to the joint, cutting it out, both sides, down to the rear, same thing...before this, you can cut from the knee down off with a hack saw, no meat there anyway. Then you have tenderloin in the inner rib cage, back straps, and the rest is cut off into bag for sausage or burger. the four quarters can be then trimmed at home. saves some of the weight, but not cutting everything up in the field. I am not a professional by any means. You can watch youtube and friends, but just like gutting one out, live and learn, and after a few times it becomes clear. so what if you miss a little meat hear and there. thats how you learn.
     
  15. ZigZagZeke

    ZigZagZeke Eugene Silver Supporter Silver Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    Thanks! My wife and I raise sheep and I've been wanting to learn to do the butchering myself. We can produce lamb for about $4/lb, but then if we have to take it to be processed (slaughter mandatorily included) we have to add another $2/lb to our cost of production. That's half our profit.

    A side benefit would be the ability to do my own game animals. I presently take my stuff to Shy-Ann (Oregon City) or Ebners (Canby), and they do a decent job, but it's still not exactly the way I would do things.