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Pahonix

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First time reloader, long time caller.

I'm using a 9mm lee 3 die set and am very inexperienced. I'm getting a little brass strand sheared away from the casing when I seat and crimp the bullet.

Is this normal?

Am I over crimping?

20210407_134404.jpg
 

Pahonix

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I backed off the crimp a little and readjusted the die. It's a little better.

That's possible I might be over doing it on the bell. I'll take a look at it again before proceeding
 

Pahonix

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Okay, backed off the belling to the absolute minimum that bullet will stay in there.

Will report back when I'm done resizing the 250 pieces of brass I though I had ready to seat and crimp.
 
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I backed off the crimp a little and readjusted the die. It's a little better.

That's possible I might be over doing it on the bell. I'll take a look at it again before proceeding
#1 looks like over belling and shaving off by die on outer edge. Is there a sticky spot when running that die maybe even a click sound.
#2 definately die contact/scraping when crimping (green tags) a mild sign to reduce belling. Should just be able to set bullet on top and sometimes shave bullet when seating, it happens.
#3 looks to be a bit of a gap between brass and bullet maybe set die a half turn down.

I'm not an expert but I play one on the internetweb thingy..........

20210407_134404.jpg
 

Pahonix

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Okay....did a single bullet test run without primer and powder. I know these pics are not the best and it's hard to armchair ref and not be here in person so with that said, any thoughts on these as I go through the process? After previous comments I pulled back die 2 so there is less belling.

Once fired round
20210407_151126.jpg
Die 1 Primer removal and resized
20210407_151151.jpg

Die 2 belled
20210407_151230.jpg
Testing bullet in belled housing
20210407_151259.jpg

Die 3 bullet seated and crimped
20210407_151344.jpg

There was still just a small amount of brass shavings after the crimp.
 

Pahonix

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Are you champhering the inside of your cases ?
No, I didn't trim them. My understanding is I didn't need to if I didn't trim. I checked the length on all of these and all are .74" which is good.

Edit: I'm assuming since you said something it's a step I'm missing. At what point in the process should I do that? I have one, haven't used it yet.
 
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One question: when setting up full length sizing die (#1) are you raising the ram all the way up and then screwing the die down to touch the top of the shell holder? Sure seems like they are not getting sized all the way looking at the scoring on that damn ugly dirty brass..... ;) also maybe even less belling and a sight more crimp make sure you are starting with proper setting up of the dies as instructions state and adjust from there. The Lee dies come with instructions on the proper setup along with the load data. I do not trim pistol brass and there shouldn't be a need to chamfer it either.

 
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Capn Jack

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I shoot mainly lead and I use a slight champher on the inside of the case and a slight bell. All of my loaded cartridges are then run thru a LEE Factory Crimp Die and then, "Plunk " tested in a case die. I know, it's a lot of extra trouble, but a stuck case might ruin your day, as well as your life. :s0092:
 
First time reloader, long time caller.

I'm using a 9mm lee 3 die set and am very inexperienced. I'm getting a little brass strand sheared away from the casing when I seat and crimp the bullet.

Is this normal?

Am I over crimping?

View attachment 856747
You will find that shaving lead (or sometimes guilding metal) is usually a problem when seating and crimping at the same time with most bullets. The bullet is still moving as the die starts crimping so shaving is generally going to happen with bullets without a prominent crimping groove. Yes it is an extra step that requires adjustment every time you use the dies, but to seat the bullet and then readjust (or use a taper crimp die) makes a far superior cartridge without the difficulties you are experiencing. I stopped seating and crimping in the same step over 20 years ago because of the problem you are having and use a taper crimp or factory crimp die (or readjust the dies) for the 22 or so calibers I load for.
 
One question: when setting up full length sizing die (#1) are you raising the ram all the way up and then screwing the die down to touch the top of the shell holder? Sure seems like they are not getting sized all the way looking at the scoring on that damn ugly dirty brass..... ;) also maybe even less belling and a sight more crimp make sure you are starting with proper setting up of the dies as instructions state and adjust from there. The Lee dies come with instructions on the proper setup along with the load data. I do not trim pistol brass and there shouldn't be a need to chamfer it either.
So +1 on getting the dies set-up properly, a must to be successful. Agreed, looks like the de-capping/resizing die needs to be set a bit deeper to get a full case resize.

For the belling, it’s critical to follow the setup directions and then test, slowly with a case, you may find backing it out another half turn gives you just enough of a bell to hand seat the projectile. I’ve gotten to the point that the bell or flaring is ever so slight and hand seating the bullet is very tight.

For the seating/crimping die, again follow the setup to the letter, take an empty case and keep backing out the die until the case just touches the taper crimp ridge in the die. Essentially full stroke the press using no pressure, with a case in place, and begin backing out the die until the press achieves full stroke. Push the handle up, lowering the ram and give the die a quarter to a half turn down, this will adjust your taper crimp.

Next backout the bullet seating portion all the way, load a loaded fmj round, upstroke the ram, using no pressure and adjust the bullet seater downward until you feel contact and see the ram move downward. This should get you close to perfectly seated and crimped rounds.

Additional tweaking may be necessary to get the taper crimp perfect as well as the seating depth for the bullet.

Good luck, but once you get the dies set, you’ll be in business.
 
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You will find that shaving lead (or sometimes guilding metal) is usually a problem when seating and crimping at the same time with most bullets. The bullet is still moving as the die starts crimping so shaving is generally going to happen with bullets without a prominent crimping groove. Yes it is an extra step that requires adjustment every time you use the dies, but to seat the bullet and then readjust (or use a taper crimp die) makes a far superior cartridge without the difficulties you are experiencing. I stopped seating and crimping in the same step over 20 years ago because of the problem you are having and use a taper crimp or factory crimp die (or readjust the dies) for the 22 or so calibers I load for.
Re read that.... he is or was getting brass shavings not bullet shavings but yes he needs the factory crimp die but trying to find one right now is like finding a female virgin at the mustang ranch.......aint gonna happen. I think maybe if he is progressive loading he could have another step using a second seating die to seat and back one off to crimp. If he is single staging he can just adjust the same one for each step in a batch.
 

thorborg

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9mm head spaces from the rim of the brass so crimping and chamfering is not desirable in my mind albeit removing the bell produced by the ball expander is a good thing, otherwise she just likes a tight fit.
 
If he is single staging he can just adjust the same one for each step in a batch.
Um, that's exactly what I wrote "but to seat the bullet and then readjust (or use a taper crimp die) makes a far superior cartridge without the difficulties you are experiencing." I got rid of my progressive press a few years back as I'm still trying to shoot up ammunition I loaded when I first bought one in 1999. The average guy really doesn't need a progressive press, and they are a PIA to change calibers, regardless of a separate tool head for each caliber. I had five for my press. There is always something to readjust.
 
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Pahonix

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Sizing die is touching, I believe I did it right.
20210408_143058.jpg

I am not using any lube as I read that I didn't need to because I have carbide dies. These are deprimed and sized and then put in the tumbler as directed by Lee's tumber instructions.

(The pics above are from a dirty casing that I've been using for testing before I use my cleaned brass)

I'll be rereading your posts tonight after work :). Thanks everyone so far for your insight and suggestions.
 

po18guy

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Get (or use) an outside chamfering tool. Those rings of brass are coming from the OD of the case, not the ID. It could be from excess flare, or it could be from too sharp an edge on the OD of the case mouth. It is also handy to buy a stainless 6" machinist's scale and use it as a straight edge to ascertain the degree of crimp. Especially so if you are taper crimping for semi-autos.
 
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