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Crimp die questions

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Grommit327, Jun 1, 2011.

  1. Grommit327

    Grommit327 Buckley Active Member

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    I purchased a 550b on here last week and it came setup with a couple dillon die sets. I have redding 3 die sets in .40(sizing/expander/seat-crimp) and .223(neck/full/seat) that I would like to use with it also. The .40 dies have the combo seat/crimp die which I have heard it's better to do separately. Is it worth it to buy a taper crimp die? Or just eliminate one station and use the combo die?

    For the .223 I'm guessing I need to get a roll crimp die since it will be used in an AR. Any suggestions on what I should use? A couple places said the Lee factory crimp dies worked pretty good. I have to place an order through dillon soon so I could get their crimp dies if they are better.
     
  2. Rammit

    Rammit Bothel Member

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    It depends on the bullet, With lead bullets your gonna deform the bullets seating and crimping in one step, with 223 you can probably pull it off its just a huge PITA to get them adjusted pefect. If your goign to leave them on one press or toolhead then spend the extra time as your not goign to have to move it
     
  3. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Simple answer is that it is almost always easier and better to crimp as a separate operation. Far less hassle as you are able to control it separately from the seating action. Easier often leads to better finished product.

    As for the Lee Factory Crimp die, you may be able to buy a more expensive die for this purpose but you won't get a better die. The Lee FCD is as good as they get for the purpose. Easy to use and adjust.

    As for crimping and seating .223 in a single operation, you'll give that thought up after you deform a couple of rounds and they end up not allowing the bolt to go into battery. You'll hear a "Click" and then have to muscle the round out of the chamber of your AR. (Tip: Don't pry on the end of the bolt through the ejection port, just place put a firm pull on the Charging Handle while holding the rifle vertical. Hit the buttstock on a padded surface and between you pull and the inertia of the bolt carrier it will extract the jambed round.)
     
  4. Grommit327

    Grommit327 Buckley Active Member

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    Won't be loading straight lead just plated and jacketed bullets
     
  5. Grommit327

    Grommit327 Buckley Active Member

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    Definitely getting a case gauge along with the crimp die for the 223 so hopefully I don't have that problem. Sounds like the lee dies will work then for what I need. Less money I have to spend with dillon haha
     
  6. Hotwheelz

    Hotwheelz Pierce County Member

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    Yeah a lee fcd is $12-15 from midway and worth every penny I use them on all my pistol rounds and on any semi auto rifle round .223 and .308
     
  7. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Just a quick note on Dillon Dies. I use their 9mm dies for both sizing and seating. The sizing die has a spring loaded de-capping pin that stops the "primer pull back" that can happen with some dies. It's a "b$%^h when the old primer just gets pulled back into the case because it was stuck on the end of the de-capping pin.

    Also, the Dillon seater die has a bigger "funnel" at the bottom and it makes it easier to seat bullets when "going full out" on an XL-650. I actually loaded 1200 rounds in one hour as a "speed test". One sore arm that night.
     
  8. Rammit

    Rammit Bothel Member

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    same story with the plated bullets ive worked with, includign rainer and berrys.