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COUGARs

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by jerman1964, Jan 17, 2015.

  1. jerman1964

    jerman1964 Sherwood, OR Member

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    Just for sake of discussion, what do you think the BEST caliber is for hunting cougar? I just normally buy a tag and will shoot them with whatever I have on hand, but looks like we may be back in business with dogs again, so what would be the Ideal caliber for just shooting cougars?
     
  2. SHPD_Retired

    SHPD_Retired Saint Helens Well-Known Member

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    A hundred dollar bill is best for Cougars. Oh, wait. You mean the four legged kind. Sorry can't help you there as I have never hunted for that type.
     
  3. jerman1964

    jerman1964 Sherwood, OR Member

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    FUNNY MAN
     
  4. aflineman

    aflineman Both South of Eugene and East of Portland. Active Member

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    With dogs, I would say a lever 30-30, or maybe even .357 magnum. Shots on treed cats normally are not far. Might a well carry a light firearm while chasing the dogs.
     
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  5. Twodogs

    Twodogs portland Or Active Member

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    .44 mag carbine, I've got a marlin with a 16.5" barrel that would work well for hunting with dogs or calling.
     
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  6. mikeybuck

    mikeybuck Clark county Active Member

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    Cats with dogs, 22 mag, 22hornet, 357 mag carbine, 44 mag carbine.
     
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  7. Lance Jacobs

    Lance Jacobs South Willamette Valley Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I would not count on hunting with dogs coming back anytime soon. I'm not sure why anyone would feel otherwise. The Democratic Party controls both houses and the governorship, and is pretty tight with the various animal rights and pro predator groups.

    The chairman of the Oregon Senate Committee on Environment and Natural Resources is currently Chris Edwards, a very liberal Senator from Eugene. In the past, Democrats have used their Chairmanship on this committee to block any bills changing the law from even being heard and given a vote. Edwards is not going to be any different.

    So even if a bill is introduced this year, the hard cold truth is that with the way that the legislature is run, it is unlikely that it will even get a chance to be voted on.

    When shooting treed animals at close range, you can use just about anything. A friend of my father used to hunt black bears with dogs back when it was legal, and he killed all of his bears with a Colt 1911 Gold Cup 45 ACP.

    I would argue that a 243 would be about the ideal rifle cartridge for hunting cougars without dogs. I would be leery of using anything less than a 22-250.

    11 year old Shelby White from Twisp, Washington used a Tikka T3 in .243 to make her famous kill of a Cougar stalking her brother:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...aking-THIRD-mountain-cat-killed-one-week.html


    article-2568771-1BDF33C700000578-455_306x423.jpg


    article-2568771-1BDF339E00000578-724_634x597.jpg
    .
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2015
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  8. Lance Jacobs

    Lance Jacobs South Willamette Valley Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I would not shoot a cougar with a handgun myself. Here is a photo of a police officer shooting one twice at point blank range with a 9mm handgun. Another officer has to finish the cougar off with a load of Buckshot from a shotgun.

    Meanwhile, you can listen to the audio and hear the staff inside the Health Center having a fit over the police "murdering" the cougar.

     
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  9. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

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    Yeah, they're criticizing by saying shooting it wasn't necessary... from behind tempered plate glass, 2-3 stories up....

    :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2015
  10. ogre

    ogre Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    I see that you're only interested in the calibre but I'm not sure that is going to help you much. For example, a .38S&W fired from a 3" barreled "suicide special" revolver is no way the same lion medicine as a .357 fired from a 20" barreled carbine although both are considered .38 calibre.
     
  11. jerman1964

    jerman1964 Sherwood, OR Member

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    Not really looking for help, as much as discussion. I think for me, a dedicated mountain lion rifle would be the .243 win. light varmint bullets for treed cats, more solid soft points for called or open chased cats. The .223 is, in my opinion, a bit light. For a revolver, I agree with you , mostly. I like my 4" gp100
     
  12. aflineman

    aflineman Both South of Eugene and East of Portland. Active Member

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    A .243 would make a nice all around Cougar gun. For me though, I would choose a 7mm-08. If I am going to carry a "larger" rifle, I prefer it to be one I would carry on other hunting trips also. Which is why I have a BLR in 7mm-08. Nothing wrong with a .243, I just happen to have a soft spot for the 7mm-08.
     
  13. jerman1964

    jerman1964 Sherwood, OR Member

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    I had a blr in 7-08. one of the guns i regret letting go.
     
  14. Whitey375

    Whitey375 Eugene, Oregon Active Member

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    Treed cats fall easily to the Ruger Deerfield Carbine in 44 mag with lighter fast expanding bullets. Open range, 243, 257, 260, all good choices. Up close, on the ground, calling situation, shotguns, preferably semi.
     
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  15. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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    Yep we used 22.s If treed an easy target and their skull is like tissue paper thin.
     
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  16. ogre

    ogre Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    I reckon that most any calibre used in a Thompson Center Contender would prove adequate.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2015
  17. jluck

    jluck Really,Really, Close to Newport Oregon 97365 Voted #1 Member

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    For dog hunting?.... FN 5.7x28 (pistol)

    Other types of hunting, 22-250 or 7mm-08. No real reason other than I like them.
     
  18. Lance Jacobs

    Lance Jacobs South Willamette Valley Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Using any rimfires, or any centerfire rifle under 22 caliber has always been a game violation in Oregon.

    Cougar is considered to be big game by ODFW, so the minimum allowed caliber is a 22 centerfire.

    Maximum allowed magazine capacity is 5.

    .
     
  19. Lance Jacobs

    Lance Jacobs South Willamette Valley Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Rimfires are illegal for hunting cougars in Washington as well. Both Oregon and Washington have the same minimum rifle caliber requirement of 22 centerfire.

    22 Hornet would be OK to use, but 22 magnum rimfire would not.
    .
     
  20. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Having done skull preps for the vertebrate museum at Southern Oregon State College when it was my work study job while I was a Biology major there in the mid 70's. I would strongly disagree with you on your characterization of a cats skull. I have done 3 bobcats, a Lynx, and 2 cougars for the museum. I have also handled maybe a half dozen more cougar skulls over the years at a friends taxidermy shop and in High School biology. I grant you they won't stop a .22 but they sure aren't paper thin they are easily as thick as a human skull (though some human skulls are a lot thicker then others but we aren't talking politics here)
     
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