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Communications Network

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by SimonJester308, Jan 25, 2009.

  1. SimonJester308

    SimonJester308 kitsap county Member

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    Any ideas? In case of catastrophe/civil unrest/zombie uprising? I figure if the media was blacked out, how would we stay abreast with whats going on in our local areas?
     
  2. Sun195

    Sun195 Pugetropolis, WA Well-Known Member

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    Ham radio is probably best option assuming no Internet. Lots of repeaters around the Puget Sound area. I like listening to them during minor events like flooding or snow storms.
     
  3. Mark-60

    Mark-60 Someplace near Hillsboro Active Member

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    KD7*** here.


    -Mark.
     
  4. wichaka

    wichaka Wa State Well-Known Member

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    I would recommend getting a multi-band radio for such a case.
     
  5. Sun195

    Sun195 Pugetropolis, WA Well-Known Member

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    KE7*** here.
     
  6. Mutoman

    Mutoman North Bend Active Member

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    KE7*** here, mostly just monitor 2-meter when traveling.
     
  7. Rix

    Rix Tacoma Active Member

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    No ham license yet.
    CB in the truck though.
    Tacoma area: head for the "warehouse store" over by the "other big shopping place"
    (I think talking about taking over buildings someone else owns could be bad?)
    My group will be heading there, after 'stocking up" at a few other places.
     
  8. Doc In UPlace

    Doc In UPlace Tacoma-ish Well-Known Member

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    Is the website truncating your call letters?
     
  9. NWMoss

    NWMoss Lost, permanently... Member

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    Not likely. They just know that if you put your call-sign out there ANYBODY can look you up! I'd tell you how, but then they would lock in on my transponder and dx me to the moon!!!

    KG4*** here.
     
  10. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Moses Lake, WA Active Member

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    I figure that when the comm grid goes down, there will be 50 billion old CB radios dredged out of closets and put on the air.

    I'm set up for SSB on 11 meters, but my license expired years ago, so I'm not active now.

    Pops
     
  11. VWTim

    VWTim Corvallis, OR Member

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    Active ham here as well. Shortwave receivers are another good way to go.
     
  12. wakejoe

    wakejoe Beaverton, OR Well-Known Member

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    I really want to get a HAM radio license, but I'm not good with studying from a book. Learn-by-doing kind of guy
     
  13. VWTim

    VWTim Corvallis, OR Member

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    Then try some of the practice exams on www.qrz.com You can go thru there and see where your knowledge stands. A tech license is real easy, 26 correct out of 35 IIRC and $14 and you're set.
     
  14. Mutoman

    Mutoman North Bend Active Member

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    I got my license after taking a class at the community college, it really helped with the hands-on type learning. You should check around for a class.
     
  15. jrc99

    jrc99 Fairview, OR Member

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    I would suggest CB.
     
  16. SimonJester308

    SimonJester308 kitsap county Member

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    Thanks for the ideas. Looks like getting a tech license would be a good start. Any suggestions on a pretty good starter rig?
     
  17. Mutoman

    Mutoman North Bend Active Member

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    I really like my Icom IC-V8, HT(handheld transceiver), it was under 150$ and is a very rugged 2-meter hand held radio. I hear the newer versions of this radio are even better.
     
  18. Sun195

    Sun195 Pugetropolis, WA Well-Known Member

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    I have a handheld Yaesu FT-60 that's been pretty good. Icom also makes good stuff. I think a handheld radio is a good first step. I found it helpful to download the manuals for the radios I was looking at to see how logical their menu system was and how easy they were to operate. If you want extra range, an external antenna will be useful.

    Not to knock the CB suggestion, but Ham typically has greater range and many Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs) use Ham to communicate with. This fact lets you listen to what's really going on at the EOC - could be useful depending on the situation.

    I also think that FRS/GMRS radios can play a role for your family and friends. However, the range on these radios is often less than you'd like.
     
  19. VWTim

    VWTim Corvallis, OR Member

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    There are SO many good radios out there. You can't really go wrong with any from the "big 3" Yaesu, Icom, kenwood. I have a ICOM 208h as my mobile rig and a Yaesu VX-7R for an HT.

    Just figure out what you want first, base, mobile, handheld. Then figure what bands you want to operate on. 2m only? 2m/440? 6m? Lots of options. But a good dual band (2m/440) HT or mobile is a great place to start.
     
  20. Mark-60

    Mark-60 Someplace near Hillsboro Active Member

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    I'm running a Kenwood TH-F6a handheld and a couple of mobile Kenwood rigs, although I want to get a new mobile rig soon.

    156415994_t6tAD-L.jpg

    156420502_hVPuz-XL-1.jpg
    That's weird. I have no idea how that image got flipped. *shruggs*
    -Mark.