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No. But you understand that it would not be a single strike, right?
I'm guessing you don't really understand how primers work?
Think back to when you were a kid, with your cap gun. you roll out a cap, and put something heavy on it, does it go off? No. You dent it with your fingernail, does it go off? no.
You have to hit it hard enough to crush the chemicals, and some primers are made with crushed glass to make them crush easier. But a slow squeeze will just flatten them. How many times have you gotten a primer in upside down, or sideways while reloading? And how many of those went off. Its happened to me several times and exactly zero have gone off.
But a sharp whack on the hammer will set them off.
If you don't understand why an AR's firing pin doesn't touch the primer at rest, Then look up what an inertia firing pin is and how it works. [ not exactly an AR setup, but its a good explanation of how it works that a hammer resting on the back of the FP does not have it protruding from the bolt.] Then compare that to the Colts hammer mounted FP. DR
 
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I'm guessing you don't really understand how primers work?
Think back to when you were a kid, with your cap gun. you roll out a cap, and put something heavy on it, does it go off? No. You dent it with your fingernail, does it go off? no.
You have to hit it hard enough to crush the chemicals, and some primers are made with crushed glass to make them crush easier. But a slow squeeze will just flatten them. How many times have you gotten a primer in upside down, or sideways while reloading? And how many of those went off. Its happened to me several times and exactly zero have gone off.
But a sharp whack on the hammer will set them off.
If you don't understand why an AR's firing pin doesn't touch the primer at rest, Then look up what an inertia firing pin is and how it works. [ not exactly an AR setup, but its a good explanation of how it works that a hammer resting on the back of the FP does not have it protruding from the bolt.] Then compare that to the Colts hammer mounted FP. DR
I assure you that I understand the mechanics of all of this - usually a lot better than most people you'll meet. The one and only reason I mentioned AR15s is not because they mechanically resemble SAAs but because they have a tendency to dimple their primers, which can add up after multiple chamberings.

Primers can be set off after multiple light hits. The question is what the lowest impacts are that will eventually do it.

I don't know why you're comparing this to seating a primer with a wide, flat tool. The firing pin in the hammer of an SAA is not wide or flat.
 
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I assure you that I understand the mechanics of all of this - usually a lot better than most people you'll meet. The one and only reason I mentioned AR15s is not because they mechanically resemble SAAs but because they have a tendency to dimple their primers, which can add up after multiple chamberings.

Primers can be set off after multiple light hits. The question is what the lowest impacts are that will eventually do it.

I don't know why you're comparing this to seating a primer with a wide, flat tool. The firing pin in the hammer of an SAA is not wide or flat.
Have you ever pulled a match slowly across the striker? Nothing really happens. DR
 
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I assure you that I understand the mechanics of all of this - usually a lot better than most people you'll meet. The one and only reason I mentioned AR15s is not because they mechanically resemble SAAs but because they have a tendency to dimple their primers, which can add up after multiple chamberings.

Primers can be set off after multiple light hits. The question is what the lowest impacts are that will eventually do it.

I don't know why you're comparing this to seating a primer with a wide, flat tool. The firing pin in the hammer of an SAA is not wide or flat.
How many licks does it take to get to the center of a Tootsie pop?
 
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How is doing something slowly comparable to doing something repeatedly?
I'm still thinking you don't understand primers.
Try this,
Take your loaded SAA revolver, aim it down range at a safe berm. Pull the hammer back just enough to free the trigger, pull the trigger back and carefully set the firing pin on the primer. [ still holding the trigger] .
Now push hard on the back of the hammer spur. You are going to create a dent in the primer. but probably not set it off. the strength of your thumb will determine how deep the dent will be.
now do that same procedure, but instead of pushing with your thumb, tap the hammer spur with a wooden mallet. you will be surprised at how little tap it actually takes.

One slowly breaks up and pushes the priming material out of the way, and the other creates friction within the priming material as its crushed.

Remember to keep the gun pointed safely at the berm while you are doing this. just like the match sliding slowly across the striker strip there is a possibility of fire. Just not likely. DR
 
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It's borderline a question that The Heretic would ask. All kidding aside, do you want to risk an ND when it could be avoided?
No. What ever gave you that idea? I'm wondering if something could happen, not asking for permission.
 
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I'm still thinking you don't understand primers.
Try this,
Take your loaded SAA revolver, aim it down range at a safe berm. Pull the hammer back just enough to free the trigger, pull the trigger back and carefully set the firing pin on the primer. [ still holding the trigger] .
Now push hard on the back of the hammer spur. You are going to create a dent in the primer. but probably not set it off. the strength of your thumb will determine how deep the dent will be.
now do that same procedure, but instead of pushing with your thumb, tap the hammer spur with a wooden mallet. you will be surprised at how little tap it actually takes.

One slowly breaks up and pushes the priming material out of the way, and the other creates friction within the priming material as its crushed.

Remember to keep the gun pointed safely at the berm while you are doing this. just like the match sliding slowly across the striker strip there is a possibility of fire. Just not likely. DR
I dont think you understand the difference between pressure and impact.

Try driving a nail by hitting it hard, hitting it many times softly, and just pushing on the hammer. Got it?
 
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