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Colt Revolver - Seeking Input

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by 97321, Dec 4, 2011.

  1. 97321

    97321 Albany Active Member

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    I'm looking for some Colt collectors to give me some thoughts on this. My dad has recently experienced some serious health issues, so I'm helping him sort out a few things. Included in that is the fact that he wants my brother to have an old Colt revolver that's been passed down through the family from long since.

    Unfortunately about 35 years ago my mom had it nickel plated so that it would be a better presentation piece.... She didn't know any better. Please withhold your comments on that.

    When I give it to my brother I'd like to give him some background on it. Dad doesn't have anything on it, except that he received it from the family estate back in the 60's when my great-great aunt was parsing out family history to various members of the clan. No further provenance.

    This looks to me to be a 1862 Colt Police revolver. I don't think it's a conversion from the old percussion revolvers. Rather, I believe this is one of the 'new model' revolvers Colt started to manufacture to accept cartridges instead of percussion.

    I found this link: Colt 1862 Police N.M. Breach Loading Revolver
    The serial number on Dad's revolver is only about 25 off of the one shown on the block. That would put it manufactured in 1871.

    So, what do you think?

    PC030001.jpg

    PC030006.jpg
     
  2. pinecenega

    pinecenega oregon coast New Member

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    nice, keep it in the family. It's lost some value, but still a nice revolver to pass down.
     
  3. 97321

    97321 Albany Active Member

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    Thanks, pinecenega. Yep, it'll be in the family for decades to follow. My brother has a son and a daughter, my other brother has three sons, and I have three sons. There's plenty of lineage for that revolver to stay in.
     
  4. csnidow

    csnidow junction city oregon New Member

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    yes that looks like what you have. unfortunately most manufacturers don't keep very good details from back in the day Winchester in one of the best you can type in model and serial numbers and fins out all sorts of info on you exact gun. It sure would be neat if you could find some better info on when it came into your family and have a nice case or display made up for it. you might be able to get some good info and increase the value some if you take it to a professional restorer of antique firearms. since it has already been altered getting some professional grade work and research done on it wont hurt anything.
     
  5. 97321

    97321 Albany Active Member

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    I've got a nice, black-velvet/glass fronted display case for it. The auction value is irrelevant since it's going to stay in the family as long as the bloodline goes. Insurance value would be good, though. I'll let my brother decide if he wants to have it restored. It's a nice heirloom to have. I'm going to write up some history on it, much as I can gather, to give to him when I present the gun on Dad's behalf.
     
    mjbskwim and (deleted member) like this.
  6. csnidow

    csnidow junction city oregon New Member

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    that sounds extremely nice. hes a lucky guy
     
    mjbskwim and (deleted member) like this.
  7. 97321

    97321 Albany Active Member

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    Thanks. Thanks for your input, too.
     
  8. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Ardenwald, OR Well-Known Member

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    Very nice small frame Colt. The condition is excellent. A treasure for sure.
     
  9. 97321

    97321 Albany Active Member

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    Wow - I've learned a lot since I first posted. It's an 1862 Colt Police revolver. I'm pretty sure that it is a first run cap and ball revolver that was subsequently converted to a breech loading cartridge revolver. The original cap and ball revolvers were manufactured in .36 caliber. The conversions were all made in .38 caliber rimfire. About 60% of the production run (1861 - 1873) were manufactured as original cartridge revolvers, not converted over from percussion. The serial number on this clearly puts it in the latter group. The series was not restarted when the cartridge type manufacture took over.

    There are three types of conversions. Thuer was not a pretty conversion, and was largely limited to the .44 cal 1860 Army revolvers. In this case, the cylinder was not bored all the way through, and the cartridge was loaded from the front of the cylinder. Go figure. The Richards conversion cut off the back of the cylinder and replaced it with a new loading ring that accepted the cartridges from a breach load. The original ball plunger was removed from the frame, and an ejector rod was attached to the barrel. Subsequently the Richard-Mason conversion replaced the barrel entirely and with one on which the ejector rod was already attached.

    There is, of course, a lot more than what I've touched on. Lots of information out there if you look long enough and dig deep enough. Hope y'all enjoyed. Let me know if you'd like to know more. I think my brother will enjoy the piece I wrote for him. Deals with some family history too.